J A Blessing

Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, United States

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Publications (319)1395.76 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To estimate the antitumor activity of pemetrexed and cisplatin with objective tumor response (partial and complete) in patients with advanced, persistent, or recurrent carcinoma of the cervix and to determine the nature and degree of toxicity of this regimen. Secondarily, this study will determine the effects of this regimen on progression-free survival and overall survival.
    Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. 09/2014; 32(25):2744.
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    ABSTRACT: The combination of gemcitabine and docetaxel is standard first-line therapy for recurrent or metastatic uterine leiomyosarcoma. There is no standard second-line therapy. Ixabepilone is a semi-synthetic analog of epothilone B that binds to the same site on beta tubulin as paclitaxel and may be a more potent polymerizer of tubulin. We sought to determine activity of ixabepilone as a single agent as second-line treatment for patients with metastatic uterine leiomyosarcoma who had received taxane based therapy.
    Gynecologic oncology. 08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) is a multi-institution cooperative group funded by the National Cancer Institute to conduct clinical trials encompassing clinical and basic scientific research in gynecologic malignancies. These results are disseminated via publication in peer-reviewed journals. This process requires collaboration of numerous investigators located in diverse cancer research centers. Coordination of manuscript development is positioned within the Statistical and Data Center (SDC), thus allowing the SDC personnel to manage the process and refine strategies to promote earlier dissemination of results. A major initiative to improve timeliness utilizing the assignment, monitoring, and enforcement of deadlines for each phase of manuscript development is the focus of this investigation. Document improvement in timeliness via comparison of deadline compliance and time to journal submission due to expanded administrative and technologic initiatives implemented in 2006. Major steps in the publication process include generation of first draft by the First Author and submission to SDC, Co-author review, editorial review by Publications Subcommittee, response to journal critique, and revision. Associated with each step are responsibilities of First Author to write or revise, collaborating Biostatistician to perform analysis and interpretation, and assigned SDC Clinical Trials Editorial Associate to format/revise according to journal requirements. Upon the initiation of each step, a deadline for completion is assigned. In order to improve efficiency, a publications database was developed to track potential steps in manuscript development that enables the SDC Director of Administration and the Publications Subcommittee Chair to assign, monitor, and enforce deadlines. They, in turn, report progress to Group Leadership through the Operations Committee. The success of the strategies utilized to improve the GOG publication process was assessed by comparing the timeliness of each potential step in the development of primary Phase II manuscripts during 2003-2006 versus 2007-2010. Improvement was noted in 10 of 11 identified steps resulting in a cumulative average improvement of 240 days from notification of data maturity to First Author through first submission to a journal. Moreover, the average time to journal acceptance has improved by an average of 346 days. The investigation is based on only Phase II trials to ensure comparability of manuscript complexity. Nonetheless, the procedures employed are applicable to the development of any clinical trials manuscript. The assignment, monitoring, and enforcement of deadlines for all stages of manuscript development have resulted in increased efficiency and timeliness. The positioning and support of manuscript development within the SDC provide a valuable resource to authors in meeting assigned deadlines, accomplishing peer review, and complying with journal requirements.
    Clinical Trials 06/2013; · 2.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Metastatic and recurrent, platinum resistant cervix cancer has an extremely poor prognosis. The Gynecologic Oncology Group has studied >20 cytotoxic drugs or drug combinations in the second-line, phase II setting of advanced, drug resistant cervix cancer. METHODS: Nanoparticle, albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) was administered at 125mg/m(2) IV over 30minutes on days 1, 8 and 15 of each 28daycycle to 37 women with metastatic or recurrent cervix cancer that had progressed or relapsed following first-line cytotoxic drug treatment. A flexible, 2-stage accrual design that allowed stopping early for lack of treatment activity was utilized. Because of slow patient accrual, the second stage was not completed. RESULTS: Of 37 patients enrolled, 2 were ineligible due to no prior cytotoxic chemotherapy, which left 35 eligible patients evaluable for response and tolerability. All of the eligible patients had 1 prior chemotherapy regimen and 27 of them had prior radiation therapy with concomitant cisplatin. The median number of nab-paclitaxel cycles were 4 (range 1-15). Ten (28.6%; CI 14.6%-46.3%) of the 35 patients had a partial response and another 15 patients (42.9%) had stable disease. The median progression-free and overall survival were 5.0 and 9.4months, respectively. The only NCI CTCAE grade 4 event was neutropenia in 2 patients (5.7%) which resolved following dose reduction. Grade 3 neurotoxicity was reported in 1 (2.9%) patient and resolved to grade 2 following dose discontinuation. CONCLUSIONS: Nab-paclitaxel has considerable activity and moderate toxicity in the treatment of drug resistant, metastatic and recurrent cervix cancer.
    Gynecologic Oncology 09/2012; · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with recurrent ovarian cancer have limited options, especially in the context of relapse less than six months from primary platinum-based therapy. This Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) study was conducted to evaluate the impact of the histone deacetylase inhibitor, belinostat, in combination with carboplatin in women with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. Eligible patients had measurable, recurrent disease within six months of their last dose of a platinum-based combination. Belinostat was dosed at 1000 mg/m(2) daily for five days with carboplatin AUC 5 on day three of 21-day cycles. The primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR), using a two-stage design. Twenty-nine women enrolled on study and 27 were evaluable. The median number of cycles given was two (range 1-10). One patient had a complete response and one had a partial response, for an ORR of 7.4% (95% CI, .9%-24.3%). Twelve patients had stable disease while eight had increasing disease. Response could not be assessed in five (18.5%). Grade 3 and 4 events occurring in more than 10% of treated patients were uncommon and limited to neutropenia (22.2%), thrombocytopenia (14.8%), and vomiting (11.1%). The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 3.3 months and overall survival was 13.7 months. PFS of at least six months was noted in 29.6% of patients. Due to the lack of drug activity, the study was closed after the first-stage. The addition of belinostat to carboplatin had little activity in a population with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer.
    Gynecologic Oncology 02/2012; 125(2):367-71. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To estimate activity and safety of trabectedin 1.5 mg/m2 IV over 24 hours every 3 weeks (1 cycle) in uterine leiomyosarcoma. Patients with chemotherapy naive, advanced, persistent or recurrent uterine leiomyosarcoma, acceptable organ function and PS≤2 were eligible. A two-stage design was utilized. Three responses were required in the first stage to initiate the second stage; the target sample size was 40 for the combined stages. If the true response rate was 10%, the study design provided a 95% chance of correctly classifying the treatment as "inactive." Conversely, if the true response rate was 30%, then the average probability of correctly classifying the treatment as active would be 90%. Twenty patients were eligible and evaluable. The median number of cycles was 10 (123 total cycles, range 2-29). The number of patients with partial responses was 2 (10%; 95% confidence interval of 1.2%-31.7%). Response durations were 3.3 and 5.7 months. Ten patients had stable disease (50%). The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were 5.8 months and greater than 26.1 months (median not reached), respectively. Observed grade 3/4 toxicity included: neutropenia 16/20 (1 infection); thrombocytopenia 3/20; metabolic 3/20; anemia, gastrointestinal and vascular 1/20 each. There were no treatment related deaths nor cases of liver failure. Although a second stage of accrual was not indicated based on the overall response rate, the drug was well tolerated.
    Gynecologic Oncology 01/2012; 124(1):48-52. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The study aims to evaluate the anti-tumor activity and toxicity of gemcitabine in patients with persistent or recurrent endometrial carcinoma. Patients with advanced or recurrent carcinoma of the endometrium previously treated with one chemotherapy regimen were treated on a phase II trial conducted by the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG). Gemcitabine was administered as an intravenous infusion at a dose of 800 mg/m² over 30 min on days 1 and 8 every 21 days. Twenty-four patients were entered by 11 GOG member institutions. One patient was ineligible due to wrong primary tumor. A total of ninety 21-day cycles of therapy were administered with 35% of patients receiving four or more cycles. All patients had been previously treated with a platinum-based regimen. One patient had a partial response (4%), nine had stable disease (39%), and twelve had increasing disease (52%). The median progression-free survival was 1.7 months. Treatment was generally well tolerated with only 22% of patients experiencing grade 3 or grade 4 hematologic toxicity. There was one treated-related death due to pulmonary toxicity. Gemcitabine has minimal activity in the treatment of recurrent or persistent endometrial carcinoma at the dose and schedule tested.
    Gynecologic Oncology 04/2011; 121(1):118-21. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This multicenter phase 2 trial was conducted by the Gynecologic Oncology Group to evaluate the activity and the safety of irofulven in patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Eligible patients had documented recurrent ovarian cancer 6 to 12 months after receiving a front-line platinum-based regimen and no other chemotherapy. Patients were required to have measurable disease, performance status of 0 to 2, and adequate bone marrow, hepatic, and renal functions before study entry. The dose of irofulven was 0.45 mg/kg intravenously on days 1 and 8 every 21 days. Responses were defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Fifty-five of 61 enrolled patients were evaluable for response and toxicity. There were 7 partial responses (12.7%), and 30 patients (54.6%) had stable disease. Median progression-free and overall survival were 6.4 months (1.3-37.5 months) and 22.1 months or more (2.8-57.8+ months), respectively. Patients received a median of 3 cycles (range, 1-21) of protocol therapy. Grade 4 hematologic toxicity was limited to reversible neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Grade 4 nonhematologic toxicity was limited to one patient with anorexia and another with hypomagnesemia. Irofulven administered at this dose and schedule was well tolerated but had modest activity as a single agent.
    International Journal of Gynecological Cancer 10/2010; 20(7):1137-41. · 1.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) is a multi-institution, multi-discipline Cooperative Group funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to conduct clinical trials which investigate the treatment, prevention, control, quality of survivorship, and translational science of gynecologic malignancies. In 1982, the NCI initiated a program of on-site quality assurance audits of participating institutions. Each is required to be audited at least once every 3 years. In GOG, the audit mandate is the responsibility of the GOG Quality Assurance Audit Committee and it is centralized in the Statistical and Data Center (SDC). Each component (Regulatory, Investigational Drug Pharmacy, Patient Case Review) is classified as Acceptable, Acceptable, follow-up required, or Unacceptable. To determine frequently occurring deviations and develop focused innovative solutions to address them. A database was created to examine the deviations noted at the most recent audit conducted at 57 GOG parent institutions during 2004-2007. Cumulatively, this involved 687 patients and 306 protocols. The results documented commendable performance: Regulatory (39 Acceptable, 17 Acceptable, follow-up, 1 Unacceptable); Pharmacy (41 Acceptable, 3 Acceptable, follow-up, 1 Unacceptable, 12 N/A): Patient Case Review (31 Acceptable, 22 Acceptable, follow-up, 4 Unacceptable). The nature of major and lesser deviations was analyzed to create and enhance initiatives for improvement of the quality of clinical research. As a result, Group-wide proactive initiatives were undertaken, audit training sessions have emphasized recurring issues, and GOG Data Management Subcommittee agendas have provided targeted instruction and training. The analysis was based upon parent institutions only; affiliate institutions and Community Clinical Oncology Program participants were not included, although it is assumed their areas of difficulty are similar. The coordination of the GOG Quality Assurance Audit program in the SDC has improved data quality by enhancing our ability to identify frequently occurring deviations and develop innovative solutions to avoid or minimize their occurrence in the future.
    Clinical Trials 08/2010; 7(4):390-9. · 2.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to estimate antitumor activity and toxicity of weekly docetaxel and gemcitabine as second-line chemotherapy for patients with recurrent uterine carcinosarcoma. Patients with recurrent carcinosarcoma of the uterus who had failed one regimen of chemotherapy, had a Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) performance status of 0-2 and had measurable disease were included. Treatment consisted of gemcitabine 600 mg/m(2) and docetaxel 35 mg/m(2) intravenously on days 1, 8 and 15 of a 28-day cycle until disease progression or intolerable adverse effects. This study employed an optimal but flexible two-stage design with an early stopping rule. If more than 3 out of 22-24 or more than 4 out of 25-29 patients responded, accrual to the second stage was to be initiated. Twenty-eight patients were enlisted. Three patients were not eligible after pathology review. One patient was never treated. Twenty-four patients were evaluable. Nine patients had previous radiation therapy. There were no complete responses. Partial responses were seen in two patients (8.3%), stable disease in eight (33.3%) and progressive disease in 12 patients (50%). Two patients were not evaluable (8.3%). The median progression-free survival was 1.8 months. The median survival was 4.9 months. The treatment caused myelosuppression, mainly neutropenia, but also thrombocytopenia and anemia. Dose modifications became necessary in the majority of patients. In five patients, treatment was discontinued due to toxicity. This regimen of docetaxel and gemcitabine is not active in patients with recurrent carcinosarcoma of the uterus as second-line chemotherapy.
    Gynecologic Oncology 05/2010; 118(2):139-44. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE Ixabepilone (BMS-247550) is a microtubule-stabilizing epothilone B analog with activity in taxane-resistant metastatic breast cancer. The Gynecologic Oncology Group conducted a phase II evaluation of the efficacy and safety of ixabepilone in patients with recurrent or persistent platinum- and taxane-resistant primary ovarian or peritoneal carcinoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients with measurable platinum- and taxane-resistant ovarian or peritoneal carcinoma, defined as progression during or within 6 months of one prior course of treatment with each agent, received intravenous ixabepilone 20 mg/m(2) administered over 1 hour on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle. Results Of 51 patients entered, 49 were eligible. The objective response rate was 14.3% (95% CI, 5.9% to 27.2%), with three complete and four partial responses. Twenty patients (40.8%) had stable disease, whereas sixteen (32.7%) had increasing disease. The median time to progression was 4.4 months (95% CI, 0.8 to 32.6+ months); median survival was 14.8 months (95% CI, 0.8 to 50.0) months. Patients received a median of two treatment cycles (range, 1 to 29 cycles), and 18.4% of patients received > or = six cycles. Adverse effects included peripheral grade 2 (28.5%) and grade 3 (6.1%) neuropathy, grades 3 to 4 neutropenia (20.4%), grade 3 fatigue (14.3%), grade 3 nausea/emesis (22%), grade 3 diarrhea (10%), and grade 3 mucositis (4%). CONCLUSION Ixabepilone 20 mg/m(2) over 1 hour on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle demonstrates antitumor activity and acceptable safety in patients with platinum- and taxane-resistant recurrent or persistent ovarian or primary peritoneal carcinoma.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 11/2009; 28(1):149-53. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To estimate the anti-tumor activity of pemetrexed in patients with advanced or recurrent carcinoma of the endometrium and to determine the nature and degree of toxicity. A multicenter phase II trial was conducted by the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG). Patients must have had advanced or recurrent measurable carcinoma of the endometrium and failed one prior chemotherapy regimen. Pemetrexed at a dose of 900 mg/m(2) was administered as an IV infusion over 10 min every 21 days. From May 1, 2006 to July 31, 2007, 27 patients were entered by 10 member institutions of the GOG with two patients being deemed ineligible. A total of 101 cycles were administered with 28% of patients receiving five or more cycles. Overall, the treatment was well tolerated. More serious toxicities (grade 3 and 4) included anemia in 20%, leukopenia in 40%, neutropenia in 48%, and constitutional in 16%. No treatment-related deaths were reported. One patient (4%) had a partial response. Eleven patients (44%) had stable disease and eleven (44%) patients had increasing disease. Response could not be assessed in two patients (7%). Median progression-free survival was 2.7 months and overall survival was 9.4 months. Pemetrexed has minimal activity in the treatment of recurrent or persistent endometrial carcinoma at the dose and schedule tested.
    Gynecologic Oncology 10/2009; 115(3):443-6. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the activity and pharmacodynamics (PD) of bortezomib in platinum-sensitive epithelial ovarian or primary peritoneal cancer (EOC/PPC). Eligible women with recurrent EOC/PPC progressing between 6 and 12 months after initial chemotherapy were treated with bortezomib on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 [1.5 (cohort I) and 1.3 (cohort II) mg/m(2)/dose]. Patients must have had initial chemotherapy only. Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) was assessed by computed tomography (CT) scan every 2 cycles. 20S proteasome activity was quantified in three pre-treatment and a 1-hour post-treatment (cycle one, day 1) whole blood lysates. Initially, 26 evaluable patients were treated at the 1.5 mg/m(2)/dose level. Objective response rate was 3.8% (1/26), a partial response. An additional 10 patients (38.5%) had stable disease. Given concerns that treatment discontinuations due to toxicity limited drug exposure/activity a second cohort of 29 evaluable patients was accrued at 1.3 mg/m(2)/dose. The 1.3 mg/m(2)/dose regimen is currently approved as an indication for multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. Treatment was more tolerable, although objective responses remained low at 6.9% (2/29, partial responses). Second stage accrual was not warranted at either dose. Bortezomib effectively inhibited 20S proteasome activity in whole blood lysates between 37 and 92% in 24/25 (96%) patients in cohort I, and 14-84% in 27/28 (96%) patients in cohort II who provided satisfactory pre- and post-treatment specimens for testing. Bortezomib has minimal activity as a single-agent in the treatment of recurrent platinum-sensitive EOC/PPC. Treatment with bortezomib at 1.5 mg/m(2)/dose was not feasible in this patient population due to excess toxicity. Bortezomib was well tolerated at 1.3 mg/m(2)/dose.
    Gynecologic Oncology 09/2009; 115(2):215-20. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To estimate antitumor activity and toxicity of weekly topotecan hydrochloride in patients with persistent or recurrent cervical carcinoma who failed prior treatment. Women entered on study had or failed one prior chemotherapy regimen in addition to radiosensitizing chemotherapy, performance status less than 3, and adequate hematologic, renal, hepatic, and neurological function. Topotecan was infused at 3.0 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days. Twenty-seven patients were enrolled onto this study with 25 evaluable. Twenty-two patients had received radiation and chemotherapy prior to study. A median of two and mean of three courses of chemotherapy was given (range, one to eight courses). The most frequently severe adverse events were grade 3 anemia (28%) and grade 4 (4%) along with grade 3 neutropenia (8%) and grade 4 (8%). Two patients had grade 4 thrombocytopenia. There were no complete or partial responders. Ten patients (40%) had stable disease, twelve (48%) had increasing disease, and response could not be assessed in three (12%). The median progression-free survival was 2.4 months for the patients with increasing disease and 6.2 months (3.5-8.8 months) for those with stable disease. Disease location was equally divided within and outside the irradiated field. The 12 patients with increasing disease were more likely to have disease outside the pelvic radiation field. There were no complete or partial responders to weekly topotecan among the 25 patients in this study.
    Gynecologic Oncology 09/2009; 115(2):285-9. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE A phase II study was conducted to determine the response rate of ixabepilone (BMS-247550, National Cancer Institute (NCI)-supplied agent investigational new drug No. 59,699) in patients with persistent or recurrent endometrial cancer who have progressed despite standard therapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS Eligible patients had recurrent or persistent endometrial cancer and measurable disease. One prior chemotherapeutic regimen, which could have included either paclitaxel or docetaxel, was allowed. Patients received ixabepilone 40 mg/m(2) as a 3-hour infusion on day 1 of a 21-day cycle. Treatment was continued until disease progression or until unacceptable toxicity occurred. Results Fifty-two patients were entered on the study, and 50 of these were eligible. The median age was 64 years (range, 40 to 83 years). Prior treatment included radiation in 21 patients (42%) and hormonal therapy in eight patients (16%). All patients had prior chemotherapy, and 47 (94%) received prior paclitaxel therapy. The overall response rate was 12%; one patient achieved a complete remission (2%), and five achieved partial remission (10%). Stable disease for at least 8 weeks was noted in 30 patients (60%). The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 2.9 months, and the 6-month PFS was 20%. Major grade 3 toxicities were neutropenia (52%), leukopenia (48%), gastrointestinal (24%), neurologic (18%), constitutional (20%), infection (16%), and anemia (14%). CONCLUSION In a cohort of women with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer who were previously treated with paclitaxel, ixabepilone showed modest activity of limited duration as a second-line agent.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 06/2009; 27(19):3104-8. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To estimate the antitumor activity of pemetrexed in patients with persistent or recurrent platinum-resistant epithelial ovarian or primary peritoneal cancer and to determine the nature and degree of toxicities. A phase II trial was conducted by the Gynecologic Oncology Group. Patients must have had cancer that had progressed on platinum-based primary chemotherapy or recurred within 6 months. Pemetrexed at a dose of 900 mg/m(2) was to be administered as an intravenous infusion over 10 minutes every 21 days. Dose delay and adjustment was permitted for toxicity. Treatment was continued until disease progression or unacceptable adverse effects. From July 6, 2004, to August 23, 2006, 51 patients were entered. A total of 259 cycles (median, four; range one to 19 cycles) of pemetrexed were administered, with 40% of patients receiving six or more cycles. Overall, the treatment was well tolerated. More serious toxicities (grade 3 and 4) included neutropenia in 42%, leukopenia in 25%, anemia in 15%, and constitutional in 15% of patients. No treatment-related deaths were reported. One patient (2%) had a complete and nine patients (19%) had partial responses, with a median duration response of 8.4 months. Seventeen patients (35%) had stable disease for a median of 4.1 months. Eighteen patients (38%) had increasing disease. Three patients (6%) were not assessable. Median progression-free survival was 2.9 months, and overall survival was 11.4 months. Pemetrexed has sufficient activity in the treatment of recurrent platinum-resistant ovarian cancer at the dose and schedule tested to warrant further investigation.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 04/2009; 27(16):2686-91. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To estimate the anti-tumor activity of pemetrexed in patients with advanced or recurrent carcinoma of the cervix that failed on higher priority treatment protocols and to determine the nature and degree of toxicity. A multicenter Phase II trial was conducted by the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG). Patients must have had advanced or recurrent measurable carcinoma of the cervix, and failed one prior chemotherapy regimen. Pemetrexed at a dose of 900 mg/m(2) was to be administered as an IV infusion over 10 min every 21 days. From July 6, 2004 to April 3, 2006, twenty-nine patients were entered by ten member institutions of the GOG. Two patients did not receive treatment and thus were inevaluable. A total of 128 cycles were administered with 37% of patients receiving six or more cycles. The treatment was well tolerated overall. More serious toxicities (grade 3 and 4) included anemia in 41%, leukopenia in 30%, neutropenia in 26%, and infection in 26%. No treatment related deaths were reported. Four patients (15%) had partial responses with a median response duration of 4.4 months. The response rate for non-radiated or radiated disease sites was 25% and 7% respectively. Sixteen patients (59%) had stable disease and seven (26%) patients had increasing disease. Median progression free survival (PFS) was 3.1 months and overall survival (OS) was 7.4 months. Pemetrexed at this dose and schedule showed moderate activity against advanced or recurrent cervical cancer that has failed prior chemotherapy. Data from other tumor sites has suggested synergy between pemetrexed and cisplatin and should be considered for further study.
    Gynecologic Oncology 08/2008; 110(1):65-70. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A phase II study was conducted to evaluate the anti-tumor activity and adverse effects of weekly docetaxel in patients with previously treated endometrial cancer. Eligible patients were to have measurable disease with no more than one prior chemotherapy regimen. Docetaxel 36 mg/m(2) was administered intravenously over 1 h on days 1, 8 and 15. Cycles were repeated every 28 days until progression of disease or adverse effects prohibited further therapy. Twenty-seven patients were entered onto this study, of whom 26 were eligible and evaluable. All patients had received prior platinum with twenty (76.9%) having received prior treatment with paclitaxel. There were two (7.7%) partial responses, eight patients (30.8%) with stable disease, and fourteen patients (53.8%) with increasing disease. The most frequently reported adverse events were leucopenia, neutropenia, gastrointestinal, constitutional and peripheral neuropathy. Grade 3 and 4 adverse events were uncommon. Docetaxel, at the dose and schedule tested, has modest activity in this patient population.
    Gynecologic Oncology 08/2008; 111(1):22-6. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Doxorubicin-based treatment is standard therapy for metastatic uterine leiomyosarcoma. There is no standard second-line therapy. We determined activity of fixed-dose rate gemcitabine plus docetaxel as second-line treatment for metastatic uterine leiomyosarcoma. Eligible women with unresectable uterine leiomyosarcoma progressing after prior cytotoxic therapy were treated with gemcitabine 900 mg/m(2) days one and eight over 90 min, plus docetaxel 100 mg/m(2) on day 8 of a 21-day cycle with granulocyte growth factor. Patients with prior pelvic radiation received lower doses. Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) response was assessed by computed tomography (CT). Forty-eight of 51 women were evaluable for response (one wrong histology, two never treated). Prior therapy was doxorubicin-based in 90%, and ifosfamide-based in 6%. The overall objective response rate is 27%, with complete response in 6.3% (3/48), and partial response in 20.8% (10/48). An additional 50% (24/48) had stable disease (median duration 5.4 months). The median number of cycles per patient was 5.5 (range 1-22); 73% of patients remained progression-free at 12 weeks and 52% at 24 weeks. The predominant toxicity was uncomplicated myelosuppression: thrombocytopenia grade 3 (29%), grade 4 (10.4%); neutropenia grade 3 (12.5%), grade 4 (8.3%) anemia grade 3 (20.8%), grade 4 (4.2%). While pulmonary toxicity was reported, no patient had drug-related pneumonitis/hypoxia-type toxicity. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 5.6+ months (range 0.7-27+ months). The median duration of objective response was 9+ months (range 3.9-24.5+ months). Fixed-dose rate gemcitabine plus docetaxel is active second-line therapy for uterine leiomyosarcoma.
    Gynecologic Oncology 07/2008; 109(3):323-8. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fixed-dose rate gemcitabine plus docetaxel is active as second-line therapy for metastatic uterine leiomyosarcoma. We sought to determine the activity of this regimen as first-line treatment. Eligible women with advanced uterine leiomyosarcoma were treated with gemcitabine 900 mg/m(2) over 90 min, on days one and eight, plus docetaxel 100 mg/m(2) on day eight, with granulocyte growth factor support on day nine of a 21-day cycle. Patients with prior pelvic radiation received lower doses. Patients were treated until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Response was assessed every other cycle by RECIST. Forty-two women enrolled, with 39 evaluable for response. Objective responses were observed in 15 of 42 patients (35.8% overall; complete response 4.8%, partial response 31%, 90% confidence interval 23.5 to 49.6%), with an additional 11 (26.2%) having stable disease. Nineteen of 38 (50%) received six or more cycles of study treatment. Myelosuppression was the major toxicity: neutropenia grade 3 in 5%, grade 4 in 12%; anemia grade 3 in 24%; thrombocytopenia grade 3 in 9.5%, grade 4 in 5%. One patient had a grade 3 allergic reaction, 17% had grade 3 fatigue. One possibly-related grade 4 pulmonary toxicity was observed. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 4.4 months (range 0.4 to 37.2+ months). Among 15 women with objective response, median response duration was 6 months (range 2.1 to 33.4+ months). Median overall survival was 16+ months (range:.4-41.3 months). Fixed-dose rate gemcitabine plus docetaxel achieves high objective response rates as first-line therapy in metastatic uterine leiomyosarcoma.
    Gynecologic Oncology 07/2008; 109(3):329-34. · 3.93 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

7k Citations
1,395.76 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1980–2012
    • Roswell Park Cancer Institute
      Buffalo, New York, United States
  • 2008
    • University of Southern California
      Los Angeles, California, United States
    • Duke University Medical Center
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • 1992–2008
    • Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
      • Department of Medicine
      New York City, New York, United States
    • University of Alabama at Birmingham
      • Department of Medicine
      Birmingham, AL, United States
  • 1978–2008
    • Gynecologic Oncology Group
      Buffalo, New York, United States
  • 2006
    • University of Mississippi Medical Center
      Jackson, Mississippi, United States
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • Division of Oncology
      Seattle, WA, United States
  • 2004–2006
    • University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
      • Department of Gynecologic Oncology
      Houston, Texas, United States
    • Fox Chase Cancer Center
      • Department of Medical Oncology
      Philadelphia, PA, United States
  • 1991–2004
    • Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
      • • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      • • Department of Medicine
      Indianapolis, IN, United States
  • 2003
    • Washington University in St. Louis
      San Luis, Missouri, United States
  • 1999
    • University of California, Los Angeles
      Los Angeles, California, United States
  • 1998–1999
    • Case Western Reserve University
      • Department of Reproductive Biology (University Hospitals Case Medical Center)
      Cleveland, OH, United States
  • 1991–1996
    • Albany Medical College
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Albany, NY, United States
  • 1994
    • University of Rochester
      • Division of Hematology/Oncology
      Rochester, NY, United States
    • University of Miami
      • Department of Medicine
      Coral Gables, FL, United States
  • 1993
    • University of Missouri - St. Louis
      Saint Louis, Michigan, United States
  • 1990–1992
    • Wake Forest University
      • School of Medicine
      Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States
  • 1989
    • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Chapel Hill, NC, United States
    • Tufts University
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Medford, MA, United States
  • 1988
    • Rush University Medical Center
      • Section of Medical Oncology
      Chicago, IL, United States
    • Concordia University–Ann Arbor
      Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
    • Wake Forest School of Medicine
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Winston-Salem, NC, United States
    • St. Luke's Hospital
      Cedar Rapids, Iowa, United States
  • 1986
    • University of Mississippi
      Mississippi, United States
    • University of California, Irvine
      • Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology
      Irvine, CA, United States
  • 1984
    • University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
      • Department of Gynecology-Obstetrics
      Buffalo, New York, United States