Julia S Wong

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (27)291.61 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Whether wide excision with margins ≥1 cm is sufficient treatment for small low- or intermediate-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is unclear. This is an updated analysis of a phase II, single-arm, prospective trial testing this hypothesis. A total of 158 patients with low- or intermediate-grade DCIS who underwent wide excision alone (without radiation or tamoxifen) were entered onto the trial from 1995 to 2002. Entry criteria included mammographic extent ≤2.5 cm, predominantly low or intermediate nuclear grade, and excision with final microscopic margins ≥1 cm. Eight-year minimum potential follow-up was required for inclusion in the analysis; the final population comprised 143 patients. Cumulative incidence curves were generated to assess rates of local recurrence (LR) or other events. Median follow-up time was 11 years. Nineteen patients (13 %) had LR as a first event within 8 years. Thirteen LR (68 %) were DCIS only and six (32 %) were invasive. Fourteen (74 %) occurred in the original quadrant. The 10-year estimated cumulative incidence of LR was 15.6 %. The estimated annual percentage rate of LR was 1.9 % per patient-year. With longer follow-up, there remains a substantial and ongoing risk of LR in patients with favorable DCIS treated with wide excision margins without radiation. This information should be useful as patients and clinicians weigh the options of wide excision with and without radiation.
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 12/2013; · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We sought to assess whether a close surgical margin (>0 and <2 mm) after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) confers an increased risk of local recurrence (LR) compared with a widely negative margin (≥2 mm). We studied 906 women with early-stage invasive breast cancer treated with BCT between January 1998 and October 2006; 91 % received adjuvant systemic therapy. Margins were coded as: (1) widely negative (n = 729), (2) close (n = 85), or (3) close (n = 84)/positive (n = 8) but having no additional tissue to remove according to the surgeon. Cumulative incidence of LR and distant failure (DF) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Gray's competing-risk regression assessed the effect of margin status on LR and Cox proportional hazards regression assessed the effect on DF, controlling for biologic subtype, age, and number of positive lymph nodes (LNs). Three hundred seventy-seven patients (41.6 %) underwent surgical re-excision, of which 63.5 % had no residual disease. With a median follow-up of 87.5 months, the 5-year cumulative incidence of LR was 2.5 %. The 5-year cumulative incidence of LR by margin status was 2.3 % (95 % CI 1.4-3.8 %) for widely negative, 0 % for close, and 6.4 % (95 % CI 2.7-14.6 %) for no additional tissue, p = 0.3. On multivariate analysis, margin status was not associated with LR; however, triple-negative subtype (AHR 3.7; 95 % CI 1.6-8.8; p = 0.003) and increasing number of positive LNs (AHR 1.6; 95 % CI 1.1-2.3; p = 0.025) were associated. In an era of routine adjuvant systemic therapy, close surgical margins and maximally resected close/positive margins were not associated with an increased risk of LR compared to widely negative margins. Additional studies are needed to confirm this finding.
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 07/2013; · 4.47 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Clinical Oncology 10/2012; · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To examine the rate of local recurrence according to the margin status for patients with pure ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated by mastectomy. METHODS AND MATERIALS: One hundred forty-five consecutive women who underwent mastectomy with or without radiation therapy for DCIS from 1998 to 2005 were included in this retrospective analysis. Only patients with pure DCIS were eligible; patients with microinvasion were excluded. The primary endpoint was local recurrence, defined as recurrence on the chest wall; regional and distant recurrences were secondary endpoints. Outcomes were analyzed according to margin status (positive, close (≤2 mm), or negative), location of the closest margin (superficial, deep, or both), nuclear grade, necrosis, receptor status, type of mastectomy, and receipt of hormonal therapy. RESULTS: The primary cohort consisted of 142 patients who did not receive postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). For those patients, the median follow-up time was 7.6 years (range, 0.6-13.0 years). Twenty-one patients (15%) had a positive margin, and 23 patients (16%) had a close (≤2 mm) margin. The deep margin was close in 14 patients and positive in 6 patients. The superficial margin was close in 13 patients and positive in 19 patients. One patient experienced an isolated invasive chest wall recurrence, and 1 patient had simultaneous chest wall, regional nodal, and distant metastases. The crude rates of chest wall recurrence were 2/142 (1.4%) for all patients, 1/21 (4.8%) for those with positive margins, 1/23 (4.3%) for those with close margins, and 0/98 for patients with negative margins. PMRT was given as part of the initial treatment to 3 patients, 1 of whom had an isolated chest wall recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: Mastectomy for pure DCIS resulted in a low rate of local or distant recurrences. Even with positive or close mastectomy margins, the rates of chest wall recurrences were so low that PMRT is likely not warranted.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 09/2012; · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Although positive surgical margins are generally associated with a higher risk of local-regional recurrence (LRR) for most solid tumors, their significance after mastectomy remains unclear. We sought to clarify the influence of the mastectomy margin on the risk of LRR. METHODS AND MATERIALS: The retrospective cohort consisted of 397 women who underwent mastectomy and no radiation for newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer from 1998-2005. Time to isolated LRR and time to distant metastasis (DM) were evaluated by use of cumulative-incidence analysis and competing-risks regression analysis. DM was considered a competing event for analysis of isolated LRR. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 6.7 years (range, 0.5-12.8 years). The superficial margin was positive in 41 patients (10%) and close (≤2 mm) in 56 (14%). The deep margin was positive in 23 patients (6%) and close in 34 (9%). The 5-year LRR and DM rates for all patients were 2.4% (95% confidence interval, 0.9-4.0) and 3.5% (95% confidence interval, 1.6-5.3) respectively. Fourteen patients had an LRR. Margin status was significantly associated with time to isolated LRR (P=.04); patients with positive margins had a 5-year LRR of 6.2%, whereas patients with close margins and negative margins had 5-year LRRs of 1.5% and 1.9%, respectively. On univariate analysis, positive margins, positive nodes, lymphovascular invasion, grade 3 histology, and triple-negative subtype were associated with significantly higher rates of LRR. When these factors were included in a multivariate analysis, only positive margins and triple-negative subtype were associated with the risk of LRR. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with positive mastectomy margins had a significantly higher rate of LRR than those with a close or negative margin. However, the absolute risk of LRR in patients with a positive surgical margin in this series was low, and therefore the benefit of postmastectomy radiation in this population with otherwise favorable features is likely to be small.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 04/2012; · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) was evaluated as an alternative to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for patient setup. DTS is preferable when there are constraints with setup time, gantry-couch clearance, and imaging dose using CBCT. This study characterizes DTS data acquisition and registration parameters for the setup of breast cancer patients using nonclinical Varian DTS software. DTS images were reconstructed from CBCT projections acquired on phantoms and patients with surgical clips in the target volume. A shift-and-add algorithm was used for DTS volume reconstructions, while automated cross-correlation matches were performed within Varian DTS software. Triangulation on two short DTS arcs separated by various angular spread was done to improve 3D registration accuracy. Software performance was evaluated on two phantoms and ten breast cancer patients using the registration result as an accuracy measure; investigated parameters included arc lengths, arc orientations, angular separation between two arcs, reconstruction slice spacing, and number of arcs. The shifts determined from DTS-to-CT registration were compared to the shifts based on CBCT-to-CT registration. The difference between these shifts was used to evaluate the software accuracy. After findings were quantified, optimal parameters for the clinical use of DTS technique were determined. It was determined that at least two arcs were necessary for accurate 3D registration for patient setup. Registration accuracy of 2 mm was achieved when the reconstruction arc length was > 5° for clips with HU ≥ 1000; larger arc length (≥ 8°) was required for very low HU clips. An optimal arc separation was found to be ≥ 20° and optimal arc length was 10°. Registration accuracy did not depend on DTS slice spacing. DTS image reconstruction took 10-30 seconds and registration took less than 20 seconds. The performance of Varian DTS software was found suitable for the accurate setup of breast cancer patients. Optimal data acquisition and registration parameters were determined.
    Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics 01/2012; 13(3):3752. · 0.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients treated for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiation therapy (RT) at our center from 1976 to 1990 had a 15% actuarial 10-year local recurrence (LR) rate. Since then, improved mammographic and pathologic evaluation and greater attention to achieving negative margins may have resulted in a lower risk of LR. In addition, clinical implications of hormone receptor and HER-2 status in DCIS remain unclear. We sought to determine the following: LR rates with this more modern approach; the relation between LR and HER-2 status; and clinical and pathologic factors associated with HER-2(+) DCIS. We studied 246 consecutive patients who underwent BCS and RT for DCIS from 2001 to 2007. Of the patients, 96 (39%) were Grade III and the median number of involved tissue blocks was 3. Half underwent re-excision and 222 (90%) had negative margins (>2 mm). All received whole-breast RT (40-52 Gy) and 99% (244) received a tumor bed boost (8-18 Gy). Routine estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER-2 immunohistochemistry was instituted in 2003. With median follow-up of 58 months, there were no LRs. Seven patients (3%) developed contralateral breast cancer (4 invasive and 3 in situ). Among 163 patients with immunohistochemistry, 124 were ER/PR(+)HER-2(-), 27 were ER/PR(+)HER-2(+), 6 were ER(-)/PR(-)HER-2(+), and 6 were ER(-)/PR(-)HER-2(-). On univariable analysis, HER-2(+)was significantly associated with Grade III, ER(-)/PR(-), central necrosis, comedo subtype, more extensive DCIS, and postmenopausal status. On multivariable analysis, Grade III and postmenopausal status remained significantly associated with HER-2(+). In an era of mammographically identified DCIS, larger excisions, widely negative margins and the use of a tumor bed boost, we observed no LR regardless of ER/PR/HER-2 status. Factors associated with HER-2(+)DCIS included more extensive DCIS, Grade III, ER(-)/PR(-), central necrosis, comedo subtype, and postmenopausal status. Further follow-up and additional studies are required to confirm these results.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 12/2011; 82(4):e581-6. · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study is to develop an automatic clip localization procedure for breast cancer patient setup based on Digital Tomosynthesis (DTS) and to characterize its performance with respect to the overall registration accuracy and robustness. The study was performed under an IRB-approved protocol for 12 breast cancer patients with surgical clips implanted around the tumor cavity. The registration of DTS images to planning CTs was performed using an automatic algorithm developed to overcome specific challenges of localization and registration of clips in the breast setup images. The automatic method consisted of auto-segmentation (intensity-based thresholding with a priori knowledge about clip size and location to distinguish clips from bony features) and auto-registration of the segmented clip clusters. To determine the inherent accuracy and robustness of the registration algorithm, additional simulated DTS data was analyzed. The developed algorithm is efficient in removing false positives and negatives and provides an accuracy of better than 2.3mm for 60° and 3.3mm for 40° DTS. When incorporated in clinical software, this algorithm helps to facilitate fast and accurate setup evaluation with minimal dose delivered to patients.
    Physica Medica 12/2011; · 1.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prior results of breast-conserving therapy (BCT) have shown substantial rates of local recurrence (LR) in young patients with breast cancer (BC). We studied 1,434 consecutive patients with invasive BC who received BCT from December 1997 to July 2006. Ninety-one percent received adjuvant systemic therapy; no patients received trastuzumab. Five BC subtypes were approximated: estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) positive, HER2 negative, and grades 1 to 2 (ie, luminal A); ER positive or PR positive, HER2 negative, and grade 3 (ie, luminal B); ER or PR positive, and HER2 positive (ie, luminal HER2); ER negative, PR negative, and HER2 positive (ie, HER2); and ER negative, PR negative, and HER2 negative (ie, triple negative). Actuarial rates of LR were calculated by using the Kaplan-Meier method. Median follow-up was 85 months. Overall 5-year cumulative incidence of LR was 2.1% (95% CI, 1.4% to 3.0%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of LR was 5.0% (95% CI, 3.0% to 8.3%) for age quartile 23 to 46 years; 2.2% (95% CI, 1.0% to 4.6%) for ages 47 to 54 years; 0.9% (95% CI, 0.3% to 2.6%) for ages 55 to 63 years; and 0.6% (95% CI, 0.1% to 2.2%) for ages 64 to 88 years. The 5-year cumulative incidence of LR was 0.8% (95% CI, 0.4% to 1.8%) for luminal A; 2.3% (95% CI, 0.8% to 5.9%) for luminal B; 1.1% (95% CI, 0.2% 7.4%) for luminal HER2; 10.8% (95% CI, 4.6% to 24.4%) for HER2; and 6.7% (95% CI, 3.6% to 12.2%) for triple negative. On multivariable analysis, increasing age was associated with decreased risk of LR (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.94 to 0.99; P = .009). In the era of systemic therapy and BC subtyping, age remains an independent prognostic factor after BCT. However, the risk of LR for young women appears acceptably low.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 09/2011; 29(29):3885-91. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether breast cancer subtype is associated with patterns of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), either true recurrence (TR) or elsewhere local recurrence (ELR), among women with pT1-T2 invasive breast cancer (IBC) who receive breast-conserving therapy (BCT). From Jan 1998 to Dec 2003, 1,223 women with pT1-T2N0-3 IBC were treated with BCT (lumpectomy plus whole-breast radiation). Ninety percent of patients received adjuvant systemic therapy, but none received trastuzumab. Biologic cancer subtypes were approximated by determining estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), progesterone receptor-positive (PR+), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive (HER-2+) expression, classified as luminal A (ER+ or PR+ and HER-2 negative [HER-2-]), luminal B (ER+ or PR+ and HER-2+), HER-2 (ER- and PR- and HER-2+), and basal (ER- and PR- and HER-2- ) subtypes. Imaging, pathology, and operative reports were reviewed by two physicians independently, including an attending breast radiologist. Readers were blinded to subtype and outcome. TR was defined as IBTR within the same quadrant and within 3 cm of the primary tumor. All others were defined as ELR. At a median follow-up of 70 months, 24 patients developed IBTR (5-year cumulative incidence of 1.6%), including 15 TR and 9 ELR patients. At 5 years, basal (4.4%) and HER-2 (9%) subtypes had a significantly higher incidence of TR than luminal B (1.2%) and luminal A (0.2%) subtypes (p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, basal subtype (hazard ratio [HR], 4.8, p = 0.01), younger age at diagnosis (HR, 0.97; p = 0.05), and increasing tumor size (HR, 2.1; p = 0.04) were independent predictors of TR. Only younger age (HR, 0.95; p = 0.01) significantly predicted for ELR. Basal and HER-2 subtypes are significantly associated with higher rates of TR among women with pT1-T2 IBC after BCT. Younger age predicts for both TR and ELR. Strategies to reduce TR in basal breast cancers, such as increased boost doses, concomitant radiation and chemotherapy, or targeted therapy agents, should be explored.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 05/2011; 82(3):1185-91. · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the risk of isolated regional nodal failure (RNF) among women with invasive breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiation therapy (RT) and to determine factors, including biological subtype, associated with RNF. We retrospectively studied 1,000 consecutive women with invasive breast cancer who received breast-conserving surgery and RT from 1997 through 2002. Ninety percent of patients received adjuvant systemic therapy; none received trastuzumab. Sentinel lymph node biopsy was done in 617 patients (62%). Of patients with one to three positive nodes, 34% received regional nodal irradiation (RNI). Biological subtype classification into luminal A, luminal B, HER-2, and basal subtypes was based on estrogen receptor status-, progesterone receptor status-, and HER-2-status of the primary tumor. Median follow-up was 77 months. Isolated RNF occurred in 6 patients (0.6%). On univariate analysis, biological subtype (p = 0.0002), lymph node involvement (p = 0.008), lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.02), and Grade 3 histology (p = 0.01) were associated with significantly higher RNF rates. Compared with luminal A, the HER-2 (p = 0.01) and basal (p = 0.08) subtypes were associated with higher RNF rates. The 5-year RNF rate among patients with one to three positive nodes treated with tangents alone was 2.4%; we could not identify a subset of these patients with a substantial risk of RNF. Isolated RNF is a rare occurrence after breast-conserving therapy. Patients with the HER-2 (not treated with trastuzumab) and basal subtypes appear to be at higher risk of developing RNF although this risk is not high enough to justify the addition of RNI. Low rates of RNF in patients with one to three positive nodes suggest that tangential RT without RNI is reasonable in most patients.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 02/2010; 77(1):188-96. · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mucinous breast cancer is typically associated with a favorable prognosis. This study aimed to assess recent trends and prognostic features in the treatment of mucinous breast carcinoma. A retrospective review of our database of patients who presented with mucinous breast cancer was performed. We evaluated patient and tumor characteristics and examined the relationships between these factors and risk for locoregional recurrence. One hundred eleven patients with mucinous breast cancer were identified. Seventy-one (64%) underwent lumpectomy with radiotherapy. Fourteen (13%) had lymph node metastasis, and node positivity was associated with larger tumor size; node-positive patients had a mean tumor size of 2.7 cm compared with 1.5 cm for node-negative patients (P = .0003). No patients with tumor size <1 cm had lymph node metastasis. Five patients (5%) had local and/or distant recurrence. Mucinous breast cancer is associated with a low recurrence rate as well as a low incidence of lymph node metastasis. In patients with small (<1 cm) tumors, consideration for deferring nodal evaluation may be made.
    American journal of surgery 11/2008; 196(4):549-51. · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The standard of care for patients with a positive (+) sentinel lymph node (SLN) is axillary dissection; however, for various reasons, some SLN+ patients do not undergo dissection. The purpose of this study was to define possible predictors of having four or more involved nodes to provide information for clinicians and patients making decisions about adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. We reviewed the records of 402 patients with invasive breast cancer and one to three involved SLNs who underwent completion axillary dissection at two academic cancer centers. None of these patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Factors associated with having four or more involved axillary nodes (SLNs and non-SLNs) were evaluated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Eighty-seven patients had four or more positive nodes. On multivariate analysis, having four or more SLNs was associated with tumor histology, primary tumor size, lymphovascular space invasion, extranodal extension, the number of involved SLNs, the number of uninvolved SLNs, and the size of the largest SLN metastasis. A nomogram to predict the probability of having four or more nodes based on patients' pathologic data was developed from the multivariate logistic regression model. A separate previously published data set of 206 SLN+ patients treated at a community hospital in another city was used to validate this model. Patients with a low probability of having four or more nodes can be identified from known pathologic features. The nomogram developed will be helpful to clinicians making adjuvant treatment recommendations.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 06/2008; 26(13):2093-8. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether breast cancer subtype is associated with outcome after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) consisting of lumpectomy and radiation therapy. We studied 793 consecutive patients with invasive breast cancer who received BCT from July 1998 to December 2001. Among them, 97% had pathologically negative margins of resection, and 90% received adjuvant systemic therapy. No patient received adjuvant trastuzumab. Receptor status was used to approximate subtype: estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative = luminal A; ER+ or PR+ and HER-2+ = luminal B; ER-and PR -and HER-2+ = HER-2; and ER-and PR -and HER-2-= basal. Competing risks methodology was used to analyze time to local recurrence and distant metastases. Median follow-up was 70 months. The overall 5-year cumulative incidence of local recurrence was 1.8% (95% CI, 1.0 to 3.1); 0.8% (0.3, 2.2) for luminal A, 1.5% (0.2, 10) for luminal B, 8.4% (2.2, 30) for HER-2, and 7.1% (3.0, 16) for basal. On multivariable analysis (MVA) with luminal A as baseline, HER-2 (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 9.2; 95% CI, 1.6 to 51; P = .012) and basal (AHR = 7.1; 95% CI, 1.6 to 31; P = .009) subtypes were associated with increased local recurrence. On MVA, luminal B (AHR = 2.9; 95% CI, 1.3 to 6.5; P = .007) and basal (AHR = 2.3; 95% CI, 1.1 to 5.2; P = .035) were associated with increased distant metastases. Overall, the 5-year local recurrence rate after BCT was low, but varied by subtype as approximated using ER, PR, and HER-2 status. Local recurrence was particularly low for the luminal A subtype, but was less than 10% at 5 years for all subtypes. Although further follow-up is needed, these results may be useful in counseling patients about their anticipated outcome after BCT.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 06/2008; 26(14):2373-8. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the risk of regional-nodal recurrence in patients with early-stage, invasive breast cancer, with clinically negative axillary nodes, who were treated with breast-conserving surgery, "high tangential" breast radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy, without axillary surgery or the use of a separate nodal radiation field. Between September 1998 and November 2003, 74 patients who were >/=55 years of age with Stage I-II clinically node-negative, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer underwent tumor excision to negative margins without axillary surgery as a part of a multi-institutional prospective study. Postoperatively, all underwent high-tangential, whole-breast radiotherapy with a boost to the tumor bed, followed by 5 years of hormonal therapy. For the 74 patients enrolled, the median age was 74.5 years, and the median pathologic tumor size was 1.2 cm. Lymphatic vessel invasion was present in 5 patients (7%). At a median follow-up of 52 months, no regional-nodal failures or ipsilateral breast recurrences had been identified (95% confidence interval, 0-4%). Eight patients died, one of metastatic disease and seven of other causes. In this select group of mainly older patients with early-stage hormone-responsive breast cancer and clinically negative axillary nodes, treatment with high-tangential breast radiotherapy and hormonal therapy, without axillary surgery, yielded a low regional recurrence rate. Such patients might be spared more extensive axillary treatment (axillary surgery, including sentinel node biopsy, or a separate nodal radiation field), with its associated time, expense, and morbidity.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 04/2008; 72(3):866-70. · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the likelihood of requiring major corrective surgery (MCS) after modified radical mastectomy (MRM), immediate reconstruction and radiation therapy (RT) to the reconstructed breast. The study population consisted of 62 patients who underwent MRM and immediate breast reconstruction between 1990 and 1999, had postoperative radiation and at least one follow-up visit or procedure > or = 2 months after radiation. Reconstruction consisted of a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap in 42 patients, latissimus dorsi flap in five, latissimus dorsi plus implant in six, and implant alone in nine. Median follow-up time after reconstruction was 13 months (range: 2-58) for non-implant patients and 10 months (range: 4-57) for implant patients. The primary endpoint was the incidence of major complications requiring MCS. Ten patients (16%) underwent MCS between 1 and 28 months after radiation (median in these patients of 8 months). 4/47 non-implant patients (9%) underwent MCS, compared to 6/15 implant patients (40%). Of patients followed > or = 6 months after RT, 0/38 non-implant patients underwent MCS within 6 months compared to 3/13 (23%) implant patients (p = 0.01); of patients followed for > or = 12 months after RT, the rates of MCS within 12 months were 1/24 (4%) and 2/7 (29%), respectively (p = 0.12). Patients who undergo immediate reconstruction after mastectomy using an implant followed by radiation have a high rate of subsequent MCS. The difference in the rate of MCS between the implant and non-implant groups is significant in early follow-up. Patients considering an implant followed by RT should be apprised of this increased risk. Prospective studies of these risks and the cosmetic outcomes are warranted.
    The Breast Journal 01/2008; 14(1):49-54. · 1.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) is an effective treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma. We compared the outcomes after moderate-dose hemithoracic radiotherapy (MDRT) and high-dose hemithoracic RT (HDRT) after EPP for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Between July 1994 and April 2004, 39 patients underwent EPP and adjuvant RT at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital. Between 1994 and 2002, MDRT, including 30 Gy to the hemithorax, 40 Gy to the mediastinum, and boosts to positive margins or nodes to 54 Gy, was given, generally with concurrent chemotherapy. In 2003, HDRT to 54 Gy with a matched photon/electron technique was given, with sequential chemotherapy. A total of 39 patients underwent RT after EPP. The median age was 59 years (range, 44-77). The histologic type was epithelial in 25 patients (64%) and mixed or sarcomatoid in 14 patients (36%). Of the 39 patients, 24 underwent MDRT and 15 (39%) HDRT. The median follow-up was 23 months (range, 6-71). The median overall survival was 19 months (95% confidence interval, 14-24). The median time to distant failure (DF) and local failure (LF) was 20 months (95% confidence interval, 14-26) and 26 months (95% confidence interval, 16-36), respectively. On univariate and multivariate analyses, only a mixed histologic type was predictive of inferior DF (p <0.006) and overall survival (p <0.004). The RT technique was not predictive of LF, DF, or overall survival. The LF rate was 50% (12 of 24) after MDRT and 27% (4 of 15) after HDRT (p = NS). Four patients who had undergone HDRT were alive and without evidence of disease at the last follow-up. High-dose hemithoracic RT appears to limit in-field LF compared with MDRT. However, DF remains a significant challenge, with one-half of our patients experiencing DF.
    International Journal of Radiation OncologyBiologyPhysics 08/2007; 68(5):1366-74. · 4.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Partial breast irradiation (PBI) is becoming more widely used. Accurate determination of the surgical lumpectomy cavity volume is more critical with PBI than with whole breast radiation therapy. We examined the interobserver variability in delineation of the lumpectomy cavity among four academic radiation oncologists who specialize in the treatment of breast cancer. Thirty-four lumpectomy cavities in 33 consecutive patients were evaluated. Each physician contoured the cavity and a 1.5-cm margin was added to define the planning target volume (PTV). A cavity visualization score (CVS) was assigned (1-5). To eliminate bias, the physician of record was eliminated from the analysis in all cases. Three measures of variability of the PTV were developed: average shift of the center of mass (COM), average percent overlap between the PTV of two physicians (PVO), and standard deviation of the PTV. Of variables examined, pathologic resection volume was significantly correlated with CVS, with larger volumes more easily visualized. Shift of the COM decreased and PVO increased significantly as CVS increased. For CVS 4 and 5 cases, the average COM shift was 3 mm and 2 mm, respectively, and PVO was 77% and 87%, respectively. In multiple linear regression, pathologic diameter >4 cm and CVS > or =3 were significantly associated with smaller COM shift. When CVS was omitted from analysis, PVO was significantly larger with pathologic diameter > or =5 cm, days to planning <36, and older age. Even among radiation oncologists who specialize in breast radiotherapy, there can be substantial differences in delineation of the postsurgical radiotherapy target volume. Large treatment margins may be prudent if the cavity is not clearly defined.
    International Journal of Radiation OncologyBiologyPhysics 04/2007; 67(5):1299-308. · 4.52 Impact Factor
  • Julia S Wong
    The Lancet Oncology 09/2006; 7(8):615-7. · 25.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Germline mutations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 increase the risk for breast cancer. Mutation carriers selecting breast-conservation therapy (BCT) for treatment of operable breast cancer experience a higher rate of new primary breast cancers. We sought to determine the frequency of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in women who underwent BCT. Genetic testing results were compared with the prior probability of mutations in either gene. Eighty-nine patients age 39 or younger entered the study. Genetic testing was performed for BRCA1 and BRCA2 and the BRCAPRO model determined the probability of carrying a mutation. Eight mutations were discovered (prevalence, 9.0%). Twenty (22%) uncharacterized sequence variants were found. The prior probability of carrying a mutation was 14%. Mutation carriers had a higher prior probability (.49) compared with women with uncharacterized variants (.09) or with normal genes (.11). BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are common (9%) among unselected young breast cancer patients undergoing BCT.
    The American Journal of Surgery 08/2006; 192(1):58-62. · 2.52 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

964 Citations
291.61 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2002–2013
    • Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
      • Department of Radiation Oncology
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    • Harvard Medical School
      • Department of Radiation Oncology
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2006–2010
    • Brigham and Women's Hospital
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, MA, United States