N E Carter

Northern Institute For Cancer Research, Newcastle-on-Tyne, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (9)6.71 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This paper identifies the main factors which have influenced the nature of the undergraduate orthodontic curriculum presently taught at Newcastle University. It also outlines the philosophy that underpins the teaching, states the professional aims of the tutors and spells out the clinical objectives set for the students.
    British dental journal 10/2004; 197(5):269-71. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper will illustrate how the general dental practitioner can provide care for patients with hypodontia. It will demonstrate how an interdisciplinary team works for hypodontia patients and, in particular, for those with severe hypodontia.
    British dental journal 06/2003; 194(9):479-82. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the role of oral surgery in the management of children and adolescents with hypodontia. Surgical intervention can be used as an aid to orthodontic and prosthodontic treatment. In some cases surgery can supersede orthodontics as transplantation makes it possible to move teeth between the jaws.
    British dental journal 05/2003; 194(8):423-7. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Orthodontic treatment can greatly facilitate any restorative treatment or sometimes even eliminate the need for it. There are several issues that commonly arise in the orthodontic management of patients with hypodontia. These include: space management; uprighting and aligning teeth; and management of deep overbite and retention and stability. The following paper discusses these aspects of orthodontic management.
    British dental journal 05/2003; 194(7):361-6. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper considers the role of restorative dentistry in the management of hypodontia. The paper describes the general restorative considerations common to patients with hypodontia and illustrates the variety of restorative techniques available in the restorative management of hypodontia and oligodontia.
    British dental journal 04/2003; 194(6):299-304. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper is the first of a series on the comprehensive management of young people with hypodontia. The paper looks at the background to the condition, the possible aetiological factors, the prevalence of hypodontia and other related conditions. Lastly there is consideration of the role of the paediatric dentist in interdisciplinary management of the affected child and adolescent patient.
    British dental journal 04/2003; 194(5):245-51. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this investigation was to examine the dentofacial features of a group of patients with hypodontia, in particular assessing whether cephalometric analysis confirmed the clinical assumption of a reduced lower face height, and to determine the relationship of these facial features with different numbers of missing teeth. It took the form of a cephalometric study, undertaken in a dedicated Dental Hospital clinic for patients with hypodontia. The study group comprised 59 patients seen on the Hypodontia Clinic: 32 females, 27 males, mean age 13.1+/-3.1 years (range 6-23 years). The average number of missing teeth was 7 (SD 5), ranging from 1 to 21. The mean SNA, SNB, and MMA angles were within normal limits, but there was a statistically significant reduction in the MMA when more than one tooth type was missing (P = 0.007) and the ANB angle decreased as the number of missing tooth types increased (P = 0.034). The mean values for the whole sample were within the normal range and did not demonstrate any feature specific to the group, but patients with more severe hypodontia showed tendencies to a Class III skeletal relationship and a reduced maxillary-mandibular planes angle.
    Journal of orthodontics 01/2001; 27(4):315-8.
  • C R Mattick, N E Carter, P H Gordon
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine whether significant dental abnormalities are likely to be overlooked in the anterior region of the maxilla if, in the absence of any clinical indication for further views, the only radiograph used during an initial orthodontic assessment is a good-quality orthopantomogram (OPT). Two orthodontists examined, retrospectively, the written and radiographic dental hospital records of 1169 consecutive, new, young patients who on their first visit to a dental teaching hospital underwent radiographic examination comprising an OPT and one or more supplementary radiographs of the anterior maxilla. In five cases (0.43%) significant findings would have been overlooked if the intra-oral views had not been taken. These included periapical lesions and supernumerary teeth, but in three of the cases the image quality of the OPT was poor. If the OPT is not routinely supplemented by intra-oral views, the chances of completely missing significant findings in the anterior maxilla are small, provided a thorough history and clinical examination have been completed and the image quality of the OPT is good.
    International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry 10/1999; 9(3):161-8. · 0.92 Impact Factor
  • C.R. Mattick, N.E. Carter, P.H. Gordon
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives. The purpose of this study was to determine whether significant dental abnormalities are likely to be overlooked in the anterior region of the maxilla if, in the absence of any clinical indication for further views, the only radiograph used during an initial orthodontic assessment is a good-quality orthopantomogram (OPT).Sample and methods. Two orthodontists examined, retrospectively, the written and radiographic dental hospital records of 1169 consecutive, new, young patients who on their first visit to a dental teaching hospital underwent radiographic examination comprising an OPT and one or more supplementary radiographs of the anterior maxilla.Results. In five cases (0·43%) significant findings would have been overlooked if the intra-oral views had not been taken. These included periapical lesions and supernumerary teeth, but in three of the cases the image quality of the OPT was poor.Conclusions. If the OPT is not routinely supplemented by intra-oral views, the chances of completely missing significant findings in the anterior maxilla are small, provided a thorough history and clinical examination have been completed and the image quality of the OPT is good.
    International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry 08/1999; 9(3):161 - 168. · 0.92 Impact Factor