Junqi He

Capital Medical University, Peping, Beijing, China

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Publications (41)172.33 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: PEGylated hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSN-PEG) were successfully fabricated by only one simple step through hydrothermal treatment in Na2CO3 solution. HMSN-PEG nanoparticles were transformed from conventional PEG-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN-PEG). The as-synthesized HMSN-PEG nanoparticles exhibited higher loading capacity of anticancer drug (Doxorubicin) and better sustained release property than MSN and MSN-PEG particles. In vitro cell viability of HMSN-PEG nanoparticles to Hep-G2 cells was evaluated. HMSN-PEG nanoparticles have little In vitro cytotoxicity up to a concentration of 500 μg/ml. Furthermore, the DOX-loaded HMSN-PEG nanoparticles exhibited higher cytotoxicity than the DOX-loaded MSN and MSN-PEG nanoparticles against Hep-G2 cells. Therefore, the HMSN-PEG nanoparticle that generated in this PEG protecting etching strategy is a promising nanocarrier toward its potential application for cancer therapy.
    Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology 05/2015; 15(5). DOI:10.1166/jnn.2015.9270 · 1.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The beta-2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), a member of GPCR, can activate multiple signaling pathways and is an important treatment target for cardiac failure. However, the molecular mechanism about β2AR signaling regulation is not fully understood. In this study, we found that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-associated ligand (CAL) overexpression reduced β2AR-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2) activation. Further study identified CAL as a novel binding partner of β2AR. CAL is associated with β2AR mainly via the third intracellular loop (ICL3) of receptor and the coiled-coil domains of CAL, which is distinct from CAL/β1AR interaction mediated by the carboxyl terminal (CT) of β1AR and PDZ domain of CAL. CAL overexpression retarded β2AR expression in Golgi apparatus and reduced the receptor expression in plasma membrane.
    Amino Acids 04/2015; 47(7). DOI:10.1007/s00726-015-1965-6 · 3.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ang-(1-7) is an active peptide component of renin-angiotensin system and endogenous ligand for Mas receptor. In the current study, we showed that Ang-(1-7) enhanced migratory and invasive abilities of renal cell carcinoma cells 786-O and Caki-1 by wound-healing, transwell migration and transwell invasion assays. Mas antagonist A779 pretreatment or shRNA-mediated Mas knockdown abolished the stimulatory effect of Ang-(1-7). Furthermore, Ang-(1-7)-stimulated AKT activation was inhibited by either A779 pretreatment or Mas knockdown. Blockage of AKT signaling by AKT inhibitor VIII inhibited Ang-(1-7)-induced migration and invasion in 786-O cells. Taken together, our results provided the first evidence for the pro-metastatic role of Ang-(1-7) in RCC, which may help to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying the progression of this tumor. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 03/2015; 460(2). DOI:10.1016/j.bbrc.2015.03.035 · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) plays a pivotal role in the Ca2+ release process in a variety of cell types. Additionally, IP3R is distributed in ventricular intercalated discs, but its function(s) in this particular site remains unknown. Connexin (Cx43), the predominant gap junction (GJ) protein in ventricular myocardium, is linked to several signaling pathways that regulate Cx43 properties by (de)phosphorylation on multiple residues. Here, we investigated the regulatory role of IP3R in cell-cell communication and the mechanism(s) underlying this effect.ResultsIn neonatal rat and adult mouse ventricular myocytes IP3R co-localized and co-immunoprecipitated with Cx43 in GJ plaques detected by immunostaining and western blot assays. Blocking IP3R with antagonists or silencing pan-IP3R expression with shRNA hindered the 6-carboxyfluorescein (6-CFDA) diffusion through GJs and desynchronized Ca2+ transients among confluent neonatal myocytes in culture, whereas stimulation of IP3R with IP3 ester or ATP exerted the opposite effect. Likewise, 6-CFDA propagation through GJs was modulated by IP3R activation or inhibition in cell pairs of isolated adult cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, IP3R activation or IP3R suppression promoted or suppressed, respectively, Cx43 phosphorylation on S279/282. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that expression of a mutant Cx43-S282A (alanine) inhibited S279/282 phosphorylation and GJ permeability, while the S279A mutant showed the opposite effect in ventricular myocytes. Expression of these mutants in HEK293 cells revealed that cells with a dual S279/282 mutation failed to express exogenous Cx43, whereas cells with a single S279 or S282 mutation displayed Cx43 overexpression with increased phosphorylation of S279/282 and promotion of intercellular communication.Conclusions These results demonstrated, for the first time, that IP3R physically interacts with Cx43 and participates in the regulation of Cx43 phosphorylation on S279/282, thereby affecting GJ intercellular communication in ventricular myocytes.
    Cell Communication and Signaling 09/2014; 12(1):58. DOI:10.1186/PREACCEPT-9317128261148505 · 4.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The miniature pig provides an excellent experimental model for tooth morphogenesis because its diphyodont and heterodont dentition resembles that of humans. However, little information is available on the process of tooth development or the exact molecular mechanisms controlling tooth development in miniature pigs or humans. Thus, the analysis of gene expression related to each stage of tooth development is very important RESULTS: In our study, after serial sections were made, the development of the crown of the miniature pigs' mandibular deciduous molar could be divided into five main phases: dental lamina stage (E33-E35), bud stage (E35-E40), cap stage (E40-E50), early bell stage (E50-E60), and late bell stage (E60-E65). Total RNA was isolated from the tooth germ of miniature pig embryos at E35, E45, E50, and E60, and a cDNA library was constructed. Then, we identified cDNA sequences on a large scale screen for cDNA profiles in the developing mandibular deciduous molars (E35, E45, E50, and E60) of miniature pigs using Illumina Solexa deep sequencing. Microarray assay was used to detect the expression of genes. Lastly, through Unigene sequence analysis and cDNA expression pattern analysis at E45 and E60, we found that 12 up-regulated and 15 down-regulated genes during the four periods are highly conserved genes homologous with known Homo sapiens genes. Furthermore, there were 6 down-regulated and 2 up-regulated genes in the miniature pig that were highly homologous to Homo sapiens genes compared with those in the mouse. Our results not only identify the specific transcriptome and cDNA profile in developing mandibular deciduous molars of the miniature pig, but also provide useful information for investigating the molecular mechanism of tooth development in the miniature pig.
    BMC Developmental Biology 04/2014; 14(1):16. DOI:10.1186/1471-213X-14-16 · 2.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our current knowledge of tooth development derives mainly from studies in mice, which have only one set of non-replaced teeth, compared with the diphyodont dentition in humans. The miniature pig is also diphyodont, making it a valuable alternative model for understanding human tooth development and replacement. However, little is known about gene expression and function during swine odontogenesis. The goal of this study is to undertake the survey of differential gene expression profiling and functional network analysis during morphogenesis of diphyodont dentition in miniature pigs. The identification of genes related to diphyodont development should lead to a better understanding of morphogenetic patterns and the mechanisms of diphyodont replacement in large animal models and humans. The temporal gene expression profiles during early diphyodont development in miniature pigs were detected with the Affymetrix Porcine GeneChip. The gene expression data were further evaluated by ANOVA as well as pathway and STC analyses. A total of 2,053 genes were detected with differential expression. Several signal pathways and 151 genes were then identified through the construction of pathway and signal networks. The gene expression profiles indicated that spatio-temporal down-regulation patterns of gene expression were predominant; while, both dynamic activation and inhibition of pathways occurred during the morphogenesis of diphyodont dentition. Our study offers a mechanistic framework for understanding dynamic gene regulation of early diphyodont development and provides a molecular basis for studying teeth development, replacement, and regeneration in miniature pigs.
    BMC Genomics 02/2014; 15(1):103. DOI:10.1186/1471-2164-15-103 · 4.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) is a scaffold protein known to interact with a number of cancer-related proteins. nherf1 mutations (K172N and D301V) were recently identified in breast cancer cells. To investigate the functional properties of NHERF1, wild-type and cancer-derived nherf1 mutations were stably expressed in SKMES-1 cells respectively. NHERF1-wt overexpression suppressed the cellular malignant phenotypes, including proliferation, migration, and invasion. nherf1 mutations (K172N and D301V) caused complete or partial loss of NHERF1 functions by affecting the PTEN/NHERF1/PDGFRβ complex formation, inactivating NHERF1 inhibition of PDGF-induced AKT and ERK activation, and attenuating the tumor-suppressor effects of NHERF1-wt. These results further demonstrated the functional consequences of breast cancer-derived nherf1 mutations (K172N and D301V), and suggested the causal role of NHERF1 in tumor development and progression.
    FEBS letters 09/2013; 587(20). DOI:10.1016/j.febslet.2013.08.026 · 3.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The actin cytoskeleton plays an important role in cell shape determination, adhesion and cell cycle progression. Ezrinradixin-moesin (ERM)-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50), also known as Na(+)-H(+) exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1), associates with actin cytoskeleton and is related to cell cycle progression. Its Ser279 and Ser301 residues are phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdc2)/cyclin B during the mitosis phase. However, the biological significance of EBP50 phosphorylation mediated by cdc2/cyclin B is not clear. In the present study, MDA-MB-231 cells with low levels of endogenous EBP50 protein were stably transfected with constructs of EBP50 wild type (WT), phosphodeficient (serine 279 and serine 301 mutated to alanine-S279A/S301A) or phospho-mimetic (serine 279 and serine 301 mutated to aspartic acid-S279D/S301D) mutants. Subsequently, multiple phenotypes of these cells were characterized. Failure of cdc2/cyclin B-mediated EBP50 phosphorylation in cells expressing S279A/S301A (AA cells) significantly increased F-actin content, enhanced the adherence of cells to the extracellular matrix, altered cell morphology and caused defects in cytokinesis, as reflected in the formation of giant cells with heteroploid DNA and multinucleation or giant nuclei. Furthermore, knockdown of EBP50 expression in AA cells rescued cell defects such as the cytokinesis failure and abnormal cell morphology. EBP50 S279A/ S301A had a weaker binding affinity with actin than EBP50 S279D/S301D, which might explain the increase of F-actin content in the AA cells. The present results suggest that cdc2/cyclin B-mediated EBP50 phosphorylation may play a role in the regulation of various cell functions by affecting actin cytoskeleton reorganization.
    Moleculer Cells 06/2013; 36(1). DOI:10.1007/s10059-013-0014-0 · 2.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The functions and signaling mechanisms of the angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) receptor Mas have been studied extensively. However, less attention has been paid to the intracellular regulation of Mas protein. In the present study, PSD95, a novel binding protein of Mas receptor was identified, and their association was further characterized. Mas specifically interacts with the PDZ1-2 but not the PDZ3 domain of PSD95 via Mas carboxyl terminus (Mas-CT), and the last four amino acids (ETVV) of Mas-CT were determined to be essential for this interaction, as shown by the results of GST pull-down, Co-IP and confocal colocalization experiments. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies indicated that PSD95 enhanced Mas protein expression by increasing the stabilization of the receptor. Mas degradation was robustly inhibited by the proteasome inhibitor MG132 in time and dose-dependent manners, and the expression of PSD95 impaired Mas ubiquitination, indicating that the PSD95/Mas association inhibits Mas receptor degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. These findings reveal a novel mechanism of Mas receptor regulation by which its expression is modulated at the post-translational level by ubiquitination, and clarify the role of PSD95, which directly binds to Mas, blocking the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of the receptor via the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway.
    Biochemical Journal 05/2013; 453(3). DOI:10.1042/BJ20121885 · 4.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Up to 25% of the circulating nitrate in blood is actively taken up, concentrated, and secreted into saliva by the salivary glands. Salivary nitrate can be reduced to nitrite by the commensal bacteria in the oral cavity or stomach, and then further converted to nitric oxide (NO) in vivo that may play a role in gastric protection. However, whether salivary nitrate is actively secreted has not yet been determined in human beings. This study was designed to determine whether salivary nitrate is actively secreted in human beings under acute stress response and what role salivary nitrate plays in stress-induced gastric injury. To observe salivary nitrate functions in stress condition, alteration of salivary nitrate and nitrite was analyzed among 22 healthy volunteers before and after a strong stress activity, jumping down from a platform with the height of 68m. A series of stress indexes were analyzed to monitor the stress situation. We found that both the concentration and total amount of nitrate in mixed saliva were significantly increased in the human volunteers immediately following the jump, with additional increase one hour later (p<0.01). Saliva nitrite reached a maximum immediately after the jump and was maintained one hour later. To study biological functions of salivary nitrate and nitrite in the stress protection, we further carried out a water-immersion-restraint stress (WIRS) assay in male adult rats with bilateral parotid and submandibular duct ligature (BPSDL). Intragastric nitrate, nitrite, nitric oxide (NO), gastric mucosal blood flow, and gastric ulcer index (UI) were monitored and nitrate administrated in drinking water to compensate nitrate secretion in BPSDL animals. Significantly decreased levels of intragastric nitrate, nitrite, NO, and gastric mucosal blood flow were measured in BPSDL rats during the WIRS assay compared to sham control rats (p<0.05). Recovery was observed in the BPSDL rats upon nitrate administration. The WIRS-induced UI was significantly higher in the BPSDL animals than in controls, and nitrate administration rescued the WIRS-induced gastric injury in BPSDL rats. In conclusion, the present study suggests that stress promotes salivary nitrate secretion and nitrite formation, which may play important roles in gastric protection against stress-induced injury via the nitrate-dependent NO pathway.
    Free Radical Biology and Medicine 12/2012; 57. DOI:10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2012.12.015 · 5.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the regulation of rodent tooth development, but little is known about their role in tooth development in large mammals. We identified 637 unique miRNA sequences in a large-scale screen for miRNA expression profiles in the developing lower deciduous molars of miniature pigs (Sus scrofa) using Illumina Solexa deep sequencing. These candidate miRNAs and another 105 known Sus scrofa miRNAs were included in the custom-designed microarray and used to analyze the miRNA expression profile in the bud, cap, early bell, and late bell stages of tooth development. Microarray analysis revealed 166 transcripts that were differentially expressed in the four stages. Bioinformatic analysis identified 18 key miRNAs, including let-7f, miR-128, miR-200b, and miR-200c, that might play key roles in tooth development. Taken together, our results not only identified the specific microRNAome and expression profile in developing lower deciduous molars of the miniature pig, but they also provided useful information for investigating the molecular mechanism of tooth development in the miniature pig.
    PLoS ONE 12/2012; 7(12):e52256. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0052256 · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In vivo recycling of nitrate (NO(3)(-)) and nitrite (NO(2)(-)) is an important alternative pathway for the generation of nitric oxide (NO) and maintenance of systemic nitrate-nitrite-NO balance. More than 25% of the circulating NO(3)(-) is actively removed and secreted by salivary glands. Oral commensal bacteria convert salivary NO(3)(-) to NO(2)(-), which enters circulation and leads to NO generation. The transporters for NO(3)(-) in salivary glands have not yet been identified. Here we report that sialin (SLC17A5), mutations in which cause Salla disease and infantile sialic acid storage disorder (ISSD), functions as an electrogenic 2NO(3)(-)/H(+) cotransporter in the plasma membrane of salivary gland acinar cells. We have identified an extracellular pH-dependent anion current that is carried by NO(3)(-) or sialic acid (SA), but not by Br(-), and is accompanied by intracellular acidification. Both responses were reduced by knockdown of sialin expression and increased by the plasma membrane-targeted sialin mutant (L22A-L23A). Fibroblasts from patients with ISSD displayed reduced SA- and NO(3)(-)-induced currents compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, expression of disease-associated sialin mutants in fibroblasts and salivary gland cells suppressed the H(+)-dependent NO(3)(-) conductance. Importantly, adenovirus-dependent expression of the sialinH183R mutant in vivo in pig salivary glands decreased NO(3)(-) secretion in saliva after intake of a NO(3)(-)-rich diet. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sialin mediates nitrate influx into salivary gland and other cell types. We suggest that the 2NO(3)(-)/H(+) transport function of sialin in salivary glands can contribute significantly to clearance of serum nitrate, as well as nitrate recycling and physiological nitrite-NO homeostasis.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 07/2012; 109(33):13434-9. DOI:10.1073/pnas.1116633109 · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding phosphoprotein-50 (EBP50) suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation, potentially through its regulatory effect on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, although the mechanism by which this occurs remains unknown. Thus in our studies, we aimed to determine the effect of EBP50 expression on EGF-induced cell proliferation and activation of EGFR signaling in the breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. In MDA-MB-231 cells, which express low levels of EBP50, EBP50 overexpression inhibited EGF-induced cell proliferation, ERK1/2 and AKT phosphorylation. In MCF-7 cells, which express high levels of EBP50, EBP50 knockdown promoted EGF-induced cell proliferation, ERK1/2 and AKT phosphorylation. Knockdown of EBP50 in EBP50-overexpressed MDA-MB-231 cells abrogated the inhibitory effect of EBP50 on EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation and restoration of EBP50 expression in EBP50-knockdown MCF-7 cells rescued the inhibition of EBP50 on EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, further confirming that the activation of EGF-induced downstream molecules could be specifically inhibited by EBP50 expression. Since EGFR signaling was triggered by EGF ligands via EGFR phosphorylation, we further detected the phosphorylation status of EGFR in the presence or absence of EBP50 expression. Overexpression of EBP50 in MDA-MB-231 cells inhibited EGF-stimulated EGFR phosphorylation, whereas knockdown of EBP50 in MCF-7 cells enhanced EGF-stimulated EGFR phosphorylation. Meanwhile, total expression levels of EGFR were unaffected during EGF stimulation. Taken together, our data shows that EBP50 can suppress EGF-induced proliferation of breast cancer cells by inhibiting EGFR phosphorylation and blocking EGFR downstream signaling in breast cancer cells. These results provide further insight into the molecular mechanism by which EBP50 regulates the development and progression of breast cancer.
    Amino Acids 04/2012; 43(5):2027-35. DOI:10.1007/s00726-012-1277-z · 3.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Expression of phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) can be induced by estrogens at the posttranscriptional level. However, the molecular mechanism of the process is unclear. In this study, we found that the C terminus (CT) of PTEN is indispensable for 17-β-estradiol (E2)-increased PTEN expression. Therefore, we screened for PTEN-CT-associated proteins using a glutathione-S-transferase pull-down approach in combination with mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses. Our experiments led to the identification of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) as a major PTEN-CT binding partner. The first postsynaptic density protein-95/Discslarge/zonula occludens-1 homology domain of NHERF1 and the last four amino acids of PTEN were found to be key determinants of this interaction. By associating with PTEN, NHERF1 could enhance PTEN protein expression by retention of PTEN turnover, as demonstrated by NHERF1 overexpression and small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown experiments, respectively. Furthermore, NHERF1 inhibited ubiquitination of the PTEN protein upon competition with binding of PTEN to neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated 4, an ubiquitin E3 ligase. E2 strongly induced the expression of NHERF1 and PTEN only in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive cells but not in ER-negative cells. ICI182780, an ER-specific inhibitor, decreased the expression of both NHERF1 and PTEN, and ICI182780 pretreatment also retarded E2-increased PTEN expression in ER-MDA-MB-231 cells. In both ER-MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells, E2 failed to increase PTEN expression when NHERF1 was knocked down. Taken together, these are the first results that present a possible mechanism for E2-increased PTEN expression. In this process, E2 first induces NHERF1 expression by activating the ER. Upon competition with neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated 4, NHERF1 then interacts with PTEN to inhibit PTEN degradation, through an ubiquitination-dependent pathway. This in turn leads to the increase of PTEN expression at the protein level.
    Endocrinology 12/2011; 152(12):4537-49. DOI:10.1210/en.2011-1207 · 4.64 Impact Factor
  • Cancer Research 07/2011; 71(8 Supplement):1138-1138. DOI:10.1158/1538-7445.AM2011-1138 · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mesoporous hollow silica nanoparticles (MHSNs) are emerging as one of the new and promising nanomaterials for biomedical applications, but the biocompatibility of MHSNs in vivo has received little attention. In the present study, the systematic single and repeated dose toxicity, biodistribution and clearance of MHSNs in vivo were demonstrated after intravenous injection in mice. For single dose toxicity, lethal dose 50 (LD(50)) of 110 nm MHSNs was higher than 1000 mg/kg. Further repeated dose toxicity studies indicated no death was observed when mice were exposed to MHSNs at 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg by continuous intravenous administration for 14 days. These results suggest low toxicity of MHSNs when intravenous injection at single dose or repeated administrations. ICP-OES and TEM results show that the MHSNs mainly accumulate in mononuclear phagocytic cells in liver and spleen. In addition, these particles could be excreted from the body and the entire clearance time of the particles should be over 4 weeks. These findings would be useful for future development of nanotechnology-based drug delivery system and other biomedical applications.
    Biomaterials 02/2011; 32(6):1657-68. DOI:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2010.10.035 · 8.31 Impact Factor
  • Cancer Research 01/2011; 70(8 Supplement):290-290. DOI:10.1158/1538-7445.AM10-290 · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mesoporous silica nanomaterial is one of the most promising candidates as drug carrier for cancer therapy. Herein, in vitro and in vivo study of silica nanorattle (SN) with mesoporous and rattle-type structure as a drug delivery system was first reported. Hydrophobic antitumor drug docetaxel (Dtxl) was loaded into the PEGylated silica nanorattle (SN-PEG) with a diameter of 125 nm via electrostatic absorption. In human liver cancer cell Hep-G2, the half-maximum inhibiting concentration (IC(50)) of silica nanorattle encapsulated docetaxel (SN-PEG-Dtxl) was only 7% of that of free Dtxl at 72 h. In vivo toxicity assessment showed that both nanocarrier of silica nanorattle (40 mg/kg, single dose) and SN-PEG-Dtxl (20 mg/kg of Dtxl, three doses) had low systematic toxicity in healthy ICR mice. The SN-PEG-Dtxl (20 mg/kg, intravenously) showed greater antitumor activity with about 15% enhanced tumor inhibition rate compared with Taxotere on the marine hepatocarcinoma 22 subcutaneous model. The results prove that the SN-PEG-Dtxl has low toxicity and high therapy efficacy, which provides convincing evidence for the silica nanorattle as a promising candidate for a drug delivery system.
    ACS Nano 10/2010; 4(11):6874-82. DOI:10.1021/nn100918a · 12.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The beta-2 adrenergic receptor (beta2AR) has a carboxyl terminus motif that can interact with PSD-95/discs-large/ZO1 homology (PDZ) domain-containing proteins. In this paper, we identified membrane-associated guanylate kinase inverted-3 (MAGI-3) as a novel binding partner of beta2AR. The carboxyl terminus of beta2AR binds with high affinity to the fifth PDZ domain of MAGI-3, with the last four amino acids (D-S-L-L) of the receptor being the key determinants of the interaction. In cells, the association of full-length beta2AR with MAGI-3 occurs constitutively and is enhanced by agonist stimulation of the receptor. Our data also demonstrated that beta2AR-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2) activation was substantially retarded by MAGI-3 expression. These data suggest that MAGI-3 regulates beta2AR-mediated ERK activation through the physical interaction between beta2AR and MAGI-3.
    FEBS letters 03/2010; 584(11):2207-12. DOI:10.1016/j.febslet.2010.03.039 · 3.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The expression of Ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding phosphoprotein-50 (EBP50) and the intragenic mutation of the ebp50 gene have been reported to correlate with human breast cancer development, but the exact impacts on breast cancer development and its molecular mechanism are not fully understood. In this study, we investigate the potential function of EBP50 through over-expression in the breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, which has low EBP50 protein expression levels. The effects of EBP50 over-expression on cellular proliferation, anchorage-independent growth and apoptosis were examined. In addition, the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was also determined. Our results show that a decrease of cellular proliferation and attenuation of colony-forming ability were evident in MDA-MB-231 cells stably transfected with an EBP50 expressing plasmid (EBP-231) when compared with control cells. There was also a statistically significant increase in spontaneous apoptosis in EBP-231 cells accompanied by an attenuation in ERK activity. Altogether, our results suggest that restoring EBP50 expression could suppress breast cancer cell proliferation by promoting cell apoptosis and inhibiting ERK activity, and that EBP50 may be a target for development of diagnostics and therapeutics in breast cancer.
    Amino Acids 12/2009; 38(4):1261-8. DOI:10.1007/s00726-009-0437-2 · 3.65 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

983 Citations
172.33 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006–2015
    • Capital Medical University
      • • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
      • • Department of Pharmacology
      • • School of Basic Medical Sciences
      Peping, Beijing, China
  • 2001–2003
    • Emory University
      • • Department of Pharmacology
      • • Department of Biochemistry
      Atlanta, Georgia, United States
    • Fox Chase Cancer Center
      • Department of Medical Oncology
      Filadelfia, Pennsylvania, United States