Junqi He

Capital Medical University, Peping, Beijing, China

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Publications (29)103.25 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Our current knowledge of tooth development derives mainly from studies in mice, which have only one set of non-replaced teeth, compared with the diphyodont dentition in humans. The miniature pig is also diphyodont, making it a valuable alternative model for understanding human tooth development and replacement. However, little is known about gene expression and function during swine odontogenesis. The goal of this study is to undertake the survey of differential gene expression profiling and functional network analysis during morphogenesis of diphyodont dentition in miniature pigs. The identification of genes related to diphyodont development should lead to a better understanding of morphogenetic patterns and the mechanisms of diphyodont replacement in large animal models and humans. The temporal gene expression profiles during early diphyodont development in miniature pigs were detected with the Affymetrix Porcine GeneChip. The gene expression data were further evaluated by ANOVA as well as pathway and STC analyses. A total of 2,053 genes were detected with differential expression. Several signal pathways and 151 genes were then identified through the construction of pathway and signal networks. The gene expression profiles indicated that spatio-temporal down-regulation patterns of gene expression were predominant; while, both dynamic activation and inhibition of pathways occurred during the morphogenesis of diphyodont dentition. Our study offers a mechanistic framework for understanding dynamic gene regulation of early diphyodont development and provides a molecular basis for studying teeth development, replacement, and regeneration in miniature pigs.
    BMC Genomics 02/2014; 15(1):103. · 4.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) is a scaffold protein known to interact with a number of cancer-related proteins. nherf1 mutations (K172N and D301V) were recently identified in breast cancer cells. To investigate the functional properties of NHERF1, wild-type and cancer-derived nherf1 mutations were stably expressed in SKMES-1 cells respectively. NHERF1-wt overexpression suppressed the cellular malignant phenotypes, including proliferation, migration, and invasion. nherf1 mutations (K172N and D301V) caused complete or partial loss of NHERF1 functions by affecting the PTEN/NHERF1/PDGFRβ complex formation, inactivating NHERF1 inhibition of PDGF-induced AKT and ERK activation, and attenuating the tumor-suppressor effects of NHERF1-wt. These results further demonstrated the functional consequences of breast cancer-derived nherf1 mutations (K172N and D301V), and suggested the causal role of NHERF1 in tumor development and progression.
    FEBS letters 09/2013; · 3.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The actin cytoskeleton plays an important role in cell shape determination, adhesion and cell cycle progression. Ezrinradixin-moesin (ERM)-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50), also known as Na(+)-H(+) exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1), associates with actin cytoskeleton and is related to cell cycle progression. Its Ser279 and Ser301 residues are phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdc2)/cyclin B during the mitosis phase. However, the biological significance of EBP50 phosphorylation mediated by cdc2/cyclin B is not clear. In the present study, MDA-MB-231 cells with low levels of endogenous EBP50 protein were stably transfected with constructs of EBP50 wild type (WT), phosphodeficient (serine 279 and serine 301 mutated to alanine-S279A/S301A) or phospho-mimetic (serine 279 and serine 301 mutated to aspartic acid-S279D/S301D) mutants. Subsequently, multiple phenotypes of these cells were characterized. Failure of cdc2/cyclin B-mediated EBP50 phosphorylation in cells expressing S279A/S301A (AA cells) significantly increased F-actin content, enhanced the adherence of cells to the extracellular matrix, altered cell morphology and caused defects in cytokinesis, as reflected in the formation of giant cells with heteroploid DNA and multinucleation or giant nuclei. Furthermore, knockdown of EBP50 expression in AA cells rescued cell defects such as the cytokinesis failure and abnormal cell morphology. EBP50 S279A/ S301A had a weaker binding affinity with actin than EBP50 S279D/S301D, which might explain the increase of F-actin content in the AA cells. The present results suggest that cdc2/cyclin B-mediated EBP50 phosphorylation may play a role in the regulation of various cell functions by affecting actin cytoskeleton reorganization.
    Molecules and Cells 06/2013; · 2.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The functions and signaling mechanisms of the angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) receptor Mas have been studied extensively. However, less attention has been paid to the intracellular regulation of Mas protein. In the present study, PSD95, a novel binding protein of Mas receptor was identified, and their association was further characterized. Mas specifically interacts with the PDZ1-2 but not the PDZ3 domain of PSD95 via Mas carboxyl terminus (Mas-CT), and the last four amino acids (ETVV) of Mas-CT were determined to be essential for this interaction, as shown by the results of GST pull-down, Co-IP and confocal colocalization experiments. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies indicated that PSD95 enhanced Mas protein expression by increasing the stabilization of the receptor. Mas degradation was robustly inhibited by the proteasome inhibitor MG132 in time and dose-dependent manners, and the expression of PSD95 impaired Mas ubiquitination, indicating that the PSD95/Mas association inhibits Mas receptor degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. These findings reveal a novel mechanism of Mas receptor regulation by which its expression is modulated at the post-translational level by ubiquitination, and clarify the role of PSD95, which directly binds to Mas, blocking the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of the receptor via the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway.
    Biochemical Journal 05/2013; · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Up to 25% of the circulating nitrate in blood is actively taken up, concentrated, and secreted into saliva by the salivary glands. Salivary nitrate can be reduced to nitrite by the commensal bacteria in the oral cavity or stomach, and then further converted to nitric oxide (NO) in vivo that may play a role in gastric protection. However, whether salivary nitrate is actively secreted has not yet been determined in human beings. This study was designed to determine whether salivary nitrate is actively secreted in human beings under acute stress response and what role salivary nitrate plays in stress-induced gastric injury. To observe salivary nitrate functions in stress condition, alteration of salivary nitrate and nitrite was analyzed among 22 healthy volunteers before and after a strong stress activity, jumping down from a platform with the height of 68m. A series of stress indexes were analyzed to monitor the stress situation. We found that both the concentration and total amount of nitrate in mixed saliva were significantly increased in the human volunteers immediately following the jump, with additional increase one hour later (p<0.01). Saliva nitrite reached a maximum immediately after the jump and was maintained one hour later. To study biological functions of salivary nitrate and nitrite in the stress protection, we further carried out a water-immersion-restraint stress (WIRS) assay in male adult rats with bilateral parotid and submandibular duct ligature (BPSDL). Intragastric nitrate, nitrite, nitric oxide (NO), gastric mucosal blood flow, and gastric ulcer index (UI) were monitored and nitrate administrated in drinking water to compensate nitrate secretion in BPSDL animals. Significantly decreased levels of intragastric nitrate, nitrite, NO, and gastric mucosal blood flow were measured in BPSDL rats during the WIRS assay compared to sham control rats (p<0.05). Recovery was observed in the BPSDL rats upon nitrate administration. The WIRS-induced UI was significantly higher in the BPSDL animals than in controls, and nitrate administration rescued the WIRS-induced gastric injury in BPSDL rats. In conclusion, the present study suggests that stress promotes salivary nitrate secretion and nitrite formation, which may play important roles in gastric protection against stress-induced injury via the nitrate-dependent NO pathway.
    Free radical biology & medicine 12/2012; · 5.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In vivo recycling of nitrate (NO(3)(-)) and nitrite (NO(2)(-)) is an important alternative pathway for the generation of nitric oxide (NO) and maintenance of systemic nitrate-nitrite-NO balance. More than 25% of the circulating NO(3)(-) is actively removed and secreted by salivary glands. Oral commensal bacteria convert salivary NO(3)(-) to NO(2)(-), which enters circulation and leads to NO generation. The transporters for NO(3)(-) in salivary glands have not yet been identified. Here we report that sialin (SLC17A5), mutations in which cause Salla disease and infantile sialic acid storage disorder (ISSD), functions as an electrogenic 2NO(3)(-)/H(+) cotransporter in the plasma membrane of salivary gland acinar cells. We have identified an extracellular pH-dependent anion current that is carried by NO(3)(-) or sialic acid (SA), but not by Br(-), and is accompanied by intracellular acidification. Both responses were reduced by knockdown of sialin expression and increased by the plasma membrane-targeted sialin mutant (L22A-L23A). Fibroblasts from patients with ISSD displayed reduced SA- and NO(3)(-)-induced currents compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, expression of disease-associated sialin mutants in fibroblasts and salivary gland cells suppressed the H(+)-dependent NO(3)(-) conductance. Importantly, adenovirus-dependent expression of the sialinH183R mutant in vivo in pig salivary glands decreased NO(3)(-) secretion in saliva after intake of a NO(3)(-)-rich diet. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sialin mediates nitrate influx into salivary gland and other cell types. We suggest that the 2NO(3)(-)/H(+) transport function of sialin in salivary glands can contribute significantly to clearance of serum nitrate, as well as nitrate recycling and physiological nitrite-NO homeostasis.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 07/2012; 109(33):13434-9. · 9.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding phosphoprotein-50 (EBP50) suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation, potentially through its regulatory effect on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, although the mechanism by which this occurs remains unknown. Thus in our studies, we aimed to determine the effect of EBP50 expression on EGF-induced cell proliferation and activation of EGFR signaling in the breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. In MDA-MB-231 cells, which express low levels of EBP50, EBP50 overexpression inhibited EGF-induced cell proliferation, ERK1/2 and AKT phosphorylation. In MCF-7 cells, which express high levels of EBP50, EBP50 knockdown promoted EGF-induced cell proliferation, ERK1/2 and AKT phosphorylation. Knockdown of EBP50 in EBP50-overexpressed MDA-MB-231 cells abrogated the inhibitory effect of EBP50 on EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation and restoration of EBP50 expression in EBP50-knockdown MCF-7 cells rescued the inhibition of EBP50 on EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, further confirming that the activation of EGF-induced downstream molecules could be specifically inhibited by EBP50 expression. Since EGFR signaling was triggered by EGF ligands via EGFR phosphorylation, we further detected the phosphorylation status of EGFR in the presence or absence of EBP50 expression. Overexpression of EBP50 in MDA-MB-231 cells inhibited EGF-stimulated EGFR phosphorylation, whereas knockdown of EBP50 in MCF-7 cells enhanced EGF-stimulated EGFR phosphorylation. Meanwhile, total expression levels of EGFR were unaffected during EGF stimulation. Taken together, our data shows that EBP50 can suppress EGF-induced proliferation of breast cancer cells by inhibiting EGFR phosphorylation and blocking EGFR downstream signaling in breast cancer cells. These results provide further insight into the molecular mechanism by which EBP50 regulates the development and progression of breast cancer.
    Amino Acids 04/2012; 43(5):2027-35. · 3.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the regulation of rodent tooth development, but little is known about their role in tooth development in large mammals. We identified 637 unique miRNA sequences in a large-scale screen for miRNA expression profiles in the developing lower deciduous molars of miniature pigs (Sus scrofa) using Illumina Solexa deep sequencing. These candidate miRNAs and another 105 known Sus scrofa miRNAs were included in the custom-designed microarray and used to analyze the miRNA expression profile in the bud, cap, early bell, and late bell stages of tooth development. Microarray analysis revealed 166 transcripts that were differentially expressed in the four stages. Bioinformatic analysis identified 18 key miRNAs, including let-7f, miR-128, miR-200b, and miR-200c, that might play key roles in tooth development. Taken together, our results not only identified the specific microRNAome and expression profile in developing lower deciduous molars of the miniature pig, but they also provided useful information for investigating the molecular mechanism of tooth development in the miniature pig.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(12):e52256. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Expression of phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) can be induced by estrogens at the posttranscriptional level. However, the molecular mechanism of the process is unclear. In this study, we found that the C terminus (CT) of PTEN is indispensable for 17-β-estradiol (E2)-increased PTEN expression. Therefore, we screened for PTEN-CT-associated proteins using a glutathione-S-transferase pull-down approach in combination with mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses. Our experiments led to the identification of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) as a major PTEN-CT binding partner. The first postsynaptic density protein-95/Discslarge/zonula occludens-1 homology domain of NHERF1 and the last four amino acids of PTEN were found to be key determinants of this interaction. By associating with PTEN, NHERF1 could enhance PTEN protein expression by retention of PTEN turnover, as demonstrated by NHERF1 overexpression and small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown experiments, respectively. Furthermore, NHERF1 inhibited ubiquitination of the PTEN protein upon competition with binding of PTEN to neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated 4, an ubiquitin E3 ligase. E2 strongly induced the expression of NHERF1 and PTEN only in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive cells but not in ER-negative cells. ICI182780, an ER-specific inhibitor, decreased the expression of both NHERF1 and PTEN, and ICI182780 pretreatment also retarded E2-increased PTEN expression in ER-MDA-MB-231 cells. In both ER-MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells, E2 failed to increase PTEN expression when NHERF1 was knocked down. Taken together, these are the first results that present a possible mechanism for E2-increased PTEN expression. In this process, E2 first induces NHERF1 expression by activating the ER. Upon competition with neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated 4, NHERF1 then interacts with PTEN to inhibit PTEN degradation, through an ubiquitination-dependent pathway. This in turn leads to the increase of PTEN expression at the protein level.
    Endocrinology 12/2011; 152(12):4537-49. · 4.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The beta-2 adrenergic receptor (beta2AR) has a carboxyl terminus motif that can interact with PSD-95/discs-large/ZO1 homology (PDZ) domain-containing proteins. In this paper, we identified membrane-associated guanylate kinase inverted-3 (MAGI-3) as a novel binding partner of beta2AR. The carboxyl terminus of beta2AR binds with high affinity to the fifth PDZ domain of MAGI-3, with the last four amino acids (D-S-L-L) of the receptor being the key determinants of the interaction. In cells, the association of full-length beta2AR with MAGI-3 occurs constitutively and is enhanced by agonist stimulation of the receptor. Our data also demonstrated that beta2AR-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2) activation was substantially retarded by MAGI-3 expression. These data suggest that MAGI-3 regulates beta2AR-mediated ERK activation through the physical interaction between beta2AR and MAGI-3.
    FEBS letters 03/2010; 584(11):2207-12. · 3.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The expression of Ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding phosphoprotein-50 (EBP50) and the intragenic mutation of the ebp50 gene have been reported to correlate with human breast cancer development, but the exact impacts on breast cancer development and its molecular mechanism are not fully understood. In this study, we investigate the potential function of EBP50 through over-expression in the breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, which has low EBP50 protein expression levels. The effects of EBP50 over-expression on cellular proliferation, anchorage-independent growth and apoptosis were examined. In addition, the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was also determined. Our results show that a decrease of cellular proliferation and attenuation of colony-forming ability were evident in MDA-MB-231 cells stably transfected with an EBP50 expressing plasmid (EBP-231) when compared with control cells. There was also a statistically significant increase in spontaneous apoptosis in EBP-231 cells accompanied by an attenuation in ERK activity. Altogether, our results suggest that restoring EBP50 expression could suppress breast cancer cell proliferation by promoting cell apoptosis and inhibiting ERK activity, and that EBP50 may be a target for development of diagnostics and therapeutics in breast cancer.
    Amino Acids 12/2009; 38(4):1261-8. · 3.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we investigated the association of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype-5a (mGluR5a) with cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-associated ligand (CAL). Using glutathione-S-transferase pull-down techniques, we found that mGluR5a directly interacted with CAL, with the C-terminus of the receptor binding to the PSD95/Discslarge/ZO-1 homology domain of CAL. The last four amino acids (S-S-S-L) of the C-terminus of the receptor were essential determinants for the interaction. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and immunofluorescence assays revealed that full-length mGluR5a also associated with intact CAL in vivo, an observation consistent with the results from studies on fragment interactions in vitro. Functionally, upon co-expression with mGluR5a, CAL profoundly inhibited the ubiquitination of mGluR5a and enhanced receptor expression at the protein level but not at the mRNA level. These findings reveal that mGluR5a protein expression is physiologically regulated via its interaction with CAL. These results also suggest a molecular mechanism by which mGluR5a protein expression may be regulated at the post-translational level by the CAL protein, possibly by blocking ubiquitination-dependent receptor degradation.
    Journal of Neurochemistry 10/2009; 112(3):588-98. · 3.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: ObjectiveTo explore the influence of EBP50 (ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding phospho-protein-50) on microfilament cytoskeleton content and distribution in cultured Hela cells, and to investigate the relationship between the changes in microfilament cytoskeleton localization and EBP50 after PDGF (platelet-derived growth factor) stimulation, and to further clarify the molecular mechanism by which EBP50 suppresses tumor cell proliferation and migration. MethodspBK-CMV-HAEBP50 wild type recombinant plasmid and pBK-CMV-HA empty vector were transfected into Hela cells. G418 at 350 mg/L was used to screen for cell clones stably expressing EBP50. Western blot was carried out to detect EBP50 expression. Similarities and differences in microfilament cytoskeleton content and distribution in Hela cells transfected with pBK-CMV-HA-EBP50 wild type recombinant plasmid and pBK-CMV-HA empty vector were also treated with PDGF (10 ng/mL and 20 ng/mL, 37 °C, 15 min) and stained by rhodamine-labeled phalloidin to observe the distribution of microfilament cytoskeleton in the two groups. EBP50 protein distribution in PDGF-stimulated Hela cells was detected by immunofluorescence. ResultsWestern blot results confirmed that the EBP50 cDNA fragment could express EBP50 in cultured Hela cell lines and that cell lines stably expressing EBP50 were successfully obtained. Western blot and fluorescence results showed that in the cell line transfected with empty vector, the microfilament cytoskeleton was thick, loose, multidirectional and displayed crossing arrangements. The content of microfilament cytoskeleton in the cell line transfected with pBK-CMV-HA-EBP50 was different from that found in the cell line transfected with empty vector. EBP50 expression enhanced microfilament cytoskeleton polymerization into compact thin filaments. Under the stimulation of PDGF, EBP50 migrated to the cell membrane from the cytosol together with microfilament cytoskeleton and co-localized there. ConclusionEBP50 can change the distribution of microfilament cytoskeleton in cultured Hela cells and can also bind the microfilament cytoskeleton to the cell membrane under the stimulation of PDGF. EBP50 may play a role in the proliferation and migration of tumor cells by influencing the distribution and localization of microfilament cytoskeleton.
    The Chinese-German Journal of Clinical Oncology 01/2009; 8(5):282-285.
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    ABSTRACT: beta-Adrenergic receptors can activate extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) via different mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of beta1-adrenergic receptor (beta1AR)-mediated ERK activation in African green monkey kidney COS-7 cells. Treatment of cells with isoproterenol (ISO), a beta1AR selective agonist, induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in a dose-dependent manner. ISO-stimulated ERK phosphorylation was not influenced by the Gbetagamma inhibitor, betaAR kinase carboxyl terminal (betaARKct) or by the Gi inhibitor, pertussis toxin (PTX), but it was clearly abolished via inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) with H89, or of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1) with PD98059, revealing that the Galphas subunit is involved in ERK regulation through the PKA/MEK1 pathway. We also tested the effect of the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin on ERK activation, and the result was identical to that of ISO stimulation. Moreover, pretreatment with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478 or with the Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2 did not affect ERK activation. These observations suggest a mechanism of beta1AR-mediated ERK activity that involves the Galphas subunit, but not EGFR or Src tyrosine kinase.
    Amino Acids 12/2008; 38(1):75-84. · 3.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1a (mGluR1a) associates with the proteins mediating its receptor activity, suggesting a complex-controlled function of mGluR1a. Here, using glutathione-S-transferase pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assays in vitro and in vivo, we have found CFTR-associated ligand (CAL) to be a novel binding partner of mGluR1a, through its PSD95/discslarge/ZO1homology domain. Deletion of mGluR1a-carboxyl terminus (CT) or mutation of Leu to Ala in the CT of mGluR1a reduces the association, indicating the essential binding region of mGluR1a for CAL. Functionally, the interaction of mGluR1a with CAL was shown to inhibit mGluR1a-mediated ERK1/2 activation, without an apparent effect, via the C-terminal-truncated receptor. These findings might provide a novel mechanism for the regulation of mGluR1a-mediated signaling through the interaction with CAL.
    FEBS letters 12/2008; 582(30):4117-24. · 3.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A rapid and sensitive method for the quantitative determination of picroside II in rat plasma was developed and validated using liquid chromatographic separation with tandem mass spectrometric detection. The analytes of interest were extracted from rat plasma samples by ethyl acetate after acidification with 1.0% acetic acid solution. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Hypersil GOLD column (50×2.1mm I.D., 5μm) using a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile–0.1% formic acid solution (30:70, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.2mLmin−1. Detection was performed on a triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode via electrospray ionization (ESI). The calibration curve was linear in the concentration range of 1.00–400ngmL−1 in rat plasma, with a 1.00ngmL−1 lower limit of quantification (LLOQ). Satisfactory results were achieved for intraday repeatability [relative standard deviation (RSD)=6.4–12.4%] and inter-day precision (RSD=6.8–14.7%). The accuracy in terms of relative error ranged from −2.1 to 10.0%. The extraction recoveries of picroside II and icariin (internal standard) were 80.0 and 89.3%, respectively. The developed method was successfully employed to determine picroside II plasma concentrations after oral administration to Wistar rats.
    Chromatographia 11/2008; 68(11):1027-1032. · 1.44 Impact Factor
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    Shan Cheng, Jia Huang, Junqi He
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    ABSTRACT: A simple, sensitive and accurate high performance liquid chromatographic method (HPLC) with UV detection was developed and validated to determine picroside II in a new tablet formulation with paeoniflorin as internal standard. Chromatographic separation was achieved on an Agilent XDB C18 column (250 x 4.6 mm I.D., 5 microm) using a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile-water-acetic acid (18:82:0.4, v/v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min. The UV detection wavelength was set at 265 nm. Linear calibration curves were obtained in the concentration range of 0.10-100 microg/ml with the limit of quantification (LOQ) of 0.10 microg/ml. The within- and between-run precisions in terms of % relative standard deviation (RSD) were lower than 5.7% and 6.3%, respectively. The accuracy in terms of % relative error (RE) ranged from -2.3% to 5.0%. This validated method was successfully applied to the determination of the content of picroside II in a new tablet formulation.
    Pharmazie 09/2007; 62(8):577-9. · 0.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A simple and rapid high-performance liquid chromatographic method with UV detection is developed and validated to determine the concentration of voriconazole in rat and beagle dog plasma. After protein precipitation using acetonitrile, the supernatant solution is chromatographed on a Diamonsil C(18) column (250 x 4.6-mm i.d., 5 microm). The mobile phase used is a combination of acetonitrile-water-acetic acid (55:45:0.25, v/v/v) with a pH of 4.0. Detection is achieved by a UV detector monitored at a wavelength of 256 nm. The matrix calibration curves are obtained both in the concentration range of 0.10-50.0 microg/mL in rat and beagle dog plasma, with the lower limit of quantitation of 0.10 microg/mL. The intra- and inter-assay precisions in terms of % relative standard deviation are lower than 8.6% and 6.0% in rat and beagle dog plasma, respectively. The accuracy in terms of % relative error ranged from -0.5% to 8.0% and -0.5% to 6.0% in rat and beagle dog plasma, respectively. This validated method is successfully applied to determine the concentration of voriconazole in plasma after intravenous administration of 36 mg/kg voriconazole to rats and 10 mg/kg voriconazole to beagle dogs, respectively.
    Journal of chromatographic science 09/2007; 45(7):409-14. · 0.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: As a prerequisite to the determination of pharmacokinetic parameters of icariin in rats, an HPLC method using UV detection was developed and validated. Icariin and the internal standard, quercetin, were extracted from plasma samples using ethyl acetate after acidification with 0.05 mol/L NaH2PO4 solution (pH 5.0). Chromatographic separation was achieved on an Agilent XDB Cls column (250 x 4.6 mm id, 5 microm) equipped with a Shim-pack GVP-ODS C18 guard column (10 x 4.6 mm id, 5 microm) using a mobile phase of ACN/water/acetic acid (31:69:0.4 v/v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/ min. Detection was at 277 nm. The calibration curve was linear from 0.05 to 100.0 microg/mL with 0.05 microg/mL as the lower LOQ (LLOQ) in plasma. The intra- and interday precisions in terms of RSD were lower than 5.7 and 7.8% in rat plasma, respectively. The accuracy in terms of relative error (RE) ranged from -1.6 to 3.2%. The extraction recoveries of icariin and quercetin were 87.6 and 80.1%, respectively. The main pharmacokinetic parameters for rats were determined after a single intravenous administration of 10 mg/kg icariin: t1/2, 0.562 +/- 0.200 h; AUC0-infinity, 8.73 +/- 2.23 microg x h/mL; CLToT, 20.10 +/- 5.80 L/kg x h; Vz, 1.037 +/- 0.631 L/kg; MRT0-infinity, 0.134 +/- 0.040 h; and Vss, 0.170 +/- 0.097 L/kg.
    Journal of Separation Science 07/2007; 30(9):1307-12. · 2.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: RP-HPLC with UV photodiode array detection (UV-DAD) was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of vitexin-2"-O-glucoside, vitexin-2"-O-rhamnoside, rutin, and hyperoside in the extract of hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida Bge.) leaves. The analytes of interest were separated on a Diamonsil C18 column (250 x 4.6 mm id, 5 microm) with the mobile phase consisting of THF/ACN/methanol/ 0.05% phosphoric acid solution (pH 5.0) (18:1:1:80 v/vl/v). The flow rate was set at 1.0 mL/min and the eluent was detected at 340 nm for the four flavonoids. The method was linear over the studied range of 1.00-100 microg/mL for the four analytes of interest with the correlation coefficient for each analyte greater than 0.999. The LOD and LOQwere 0.03 and 0.10 microg/mL, 0.03 and 0.10 microg/mL, 0.05 and 0.15 pg/mL, 0.10 and 0.30 microg/mL for vitexin-2"-O-glucoside, vitexin-2"-0-rhamnoside, rutin, and hyperoside, respectively. The optimized method was successfully applied to the analysis of four important flavonoids in the extract of hawthorn leaves. The total amounts of the four flavonoids were 22.2, 62.3, 4.27, and 8.24 mg/g dry weight for vitexin-2"-O-glucoside, vitexin-2"-O-rhamnoside, rutin, and hyperoside in the extract of hawthorn leaves, respectively.
    Journal of Separation Science 04/2007; 30(5):717-21. · 2.59 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

304 Citations
119 Downloads
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103.25 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006–2013
    • Capital Medical University
      • • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
      • • School of Basic Medical Sciences
      Peping, Beijing, China
  • 2002–2004
    • Emory University
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      • • Department of Pharmacology
      Atlanta, GA, United States