S Anttila

Vilnius University, Vilnius, Vilniaus Apskritis, Lithuania

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Publications (138)507.91 Total impact

  • Sisko Anttila, Penny Nymark
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    ABSTRACT: - The first comprehensive textbook of Occupational Cancers - Disease orientation to assist the reader to find quickly the information relevant for a specific patient case - Contains tables and charts to collect essential information in a user-friendly way - Reviews up to date literature about epidemiology, clinical features and pathology, as well as molecular carcinogenic mechanisms and biomarkers providing a multidisciplinary view of occupational factors of cancer for readers with different backgrounds - Emphasizes prevention at an individual level as well as in populations and familiarizes readers with preventive strategies Occupational Cancers is the first fully comprehensive guide to occupational factors of malignant diseases and the diagnosis and treatment of cancer patients and those with high cancer risk due to occupational exposures. In most malignant diseases there is no straightforward causal association between a specific cancer case and exposure, but occupational and environmental factors are among many other risk factors. This book discusses potentially work-related malignancies, in the context of information about exposure assessment, specific clinical and pathological features of occupational cancer and biomarkers of exposure and disease. Epidemiological data about risk ratios of the cancer in question are reviewed for various occupations and with exposure to specific carcinogens, carcinogenic mechanisms, host susceptibility factors (genetic and other) and other environmental and life-style risk factors.
    Occupational Cancers, 1st edited by Sisko L. Anttila, Paolo Boffetta, Kurt Straif, 06/2013: chapter 10: pages 211-230; Springer., ISBN: 978-1-4471-2824-3
  • Penny Nymark, Sisko Anttila
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: - The first comprehensive textbook of Occupational Cancers - Disease orientation to assist the reader to find quickly the information relevant for a specific patient case - Contains tables and charts to collect essential information in a user-friendly way - Reviews up to date literature about epidemiology, clinical features and pathology, as well as molecular carcinogenic mechanisms and biomarkers providing a multidisciplinary view of occupational factors of cancer for readers with different backgrounds - Emphasizes prevention at an individual level as well as in populations and familiarizes readers with preventive strategies Occupational Cancers is the first fully comprehensive guide to occupational factors of malignant diseases and the diagnosis and treatment of cancer patients and those with high cancer risk due to occupational exposures. In most malignant diseases there is no straightforward causal association between a specific cancer case and exposure, but occupational and environmental factors are among many other risk factors. This book discusses potentially work-related malignancies, in the context of information about exposure assessment, specific clinical and pathological features of occupational cancer and biomarkers of exposure and disease. Epidemiological data about risk ratios of the cancer in question are reviewed for various occupations and with exposure to specific carcinogens, carcinogenic mechanisms, host susceptibility factors (genetic and other) and other environmental and life-style risk factors.
    Occupational Cancers, 1st edited by Sisko L. Anttila, Paolo Boffetta, Kurt Straif, 06/2013: chapter 12: pages 243-252; Springer., ISBN: 978-1-4471-2824-3
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    ABSTRACT: We have previously demonstrated an association between genomic alterations in 19p13, 2p16, and 9q33.1 and asbestos exposure in patients' lung tumours. This study detected allelic imbalance (AI) in these regions in asbestos-exposed lung cancer (LC) patients' histologically normal pulmonary epithelium. We extended the analyses of tumour tissue to cover a large LC patient cohort and studied DNA copy number alteration (CNA) and AI in 19p13, 2p16, and 9q33.1 for the first time in combination. We found both CNA and AI in ≥2/3 of the regions to be significantly and dose-dependently (P < 0.001) associated with pulmonary asbestos fibre count. Twenty percent of the exposed patients' LC showed CNA in ≥2/3 of the regions, whereas none of the non-exposed patients' LC showed CNA in more than one region. AI was evident in 89% of the exposed and in only 26% of the non-exposed patients' LC. The genomic alterations in 19p13, 2p16, and 9q33.1 in compilation identified asbestos-exposed patients' lung tumours better than each of the regions alone. These alterations form the basis for the development of a combinatorial molecular assay that could be used to identify asbestos-related LC.
    Molecular oncology 08/2012; · 6.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The prognosis of lung cancer is poor due to late diagnosis, the lack of established screening programs, and the paucity of early biomarkers for high-risk populations. Plasma proteome analysis was used to identify novel biomarkers for diagnosing lung cancer, and to unravel the mechanisms of underlying pathogenesis. Plasma proteins obtained from asbestos-exposed lung cancer cases detected by CT screening, asbestos-exposed subjects, clinical lung cancer patients, and healthy tobacco smokers, 5-6 cases in each group, were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and identified with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Nine proteins were selected for immunological confirmation in a test or validation set of plasma samples from an additional 49 clinical lung cancer cases, 66 asbestos-exposed patients, and 107 healthy tobacco smokers. Twenty-eight unique proteins were differentially expressed between the four study groups (p<0.05). Peroxiredoxin 1 (PRX1) was detected as a novel plasma marker for lung cancer (p=0.001). We also confirmed the previously found association of serum amyloid A with lung cancer (p<0.001). High plasma levels of tropomyosin 4 (TPM4: p<0.001) and peroxiredoxins 1 and 2 (PRX2: p<0.001) correlated with asbestos exposure or a diagnosis of asbestosis. PRX1 and PRX2 exhibited an inverse correlation with tobacco smoking (p<0.001). Plasma peroxiredoxins 1 and 2, and tropomyosin 4 were shown to associate with asbestos-exposure, and peroxiredoxin 1 with lung cancer. High plasma levels of peroxiredoxin 1 may result from genetic damage caused by reactive oxygen species. This study has identified several biomarkers worthy of further investigation in lung cancer and asbestos-related diseases.
    Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands) 04/2012; 77(2):450-9. · 3.14 Impact Factor
  • Sisko Anttila
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    ABSTRACT: Diagnosing epithelioid serosal lesions remains a challenge because numerous different processes-primary or secondary, benign or malignant-occur in body cavities, some of which are very rare. To review the newest literature and to describe the morphologic criteria and immunohistochemical markers that are useful for distinguishing epithelioid serosal lesions. Previously published literature concentrating on the newest research findings. Earlier reviews are principally referred to for established diagnostic criteria. Immunohistochemistry with a panel of antibodies has made the diagnosis of epithelioid serosal lesions very reliable. When deciding on antibodies used in differential diagnosis, it is important to consider tumor location, clinical and radiologic information, and morphologic features. Immunohistochemistry is less useful in the differential diagnosis of benign versus malignant mesothelial lesions. The diagnosis of benign versus malignant mesothelial proliferations still relies on the histologic criteria of invasion.
    Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine 03/2012; 136(3):241-52. · 2.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tobacco smoke causes lung cancer in smokers and in never-smokers exposed to second-hand tobacco smoke (SHS). Nonetheless, molecular mechanisms of lung cancer in SHS-exposed never-smokers are still elusive. We studied lung cancers from current smokers (n = 109), former smokers (n = 56) and never-smokers (n = 47) for promoter hypermethylation of five tumour suppressor genes--p16, RARB, RASSF1, MGMT and DAPK1--using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Lung tumours from ever-smokers suggested an increased risk of p16 hypermethylation as compared to never-smokers (P = 0.073), with former smokers having the highest frequency of p16 hypermethylation (P = 0.044 versus current smokers and P = 0.009 versus never-smokers). In the never-smoking group, p16 hypermethylation was seen in lung tumours from SHS-exposed individuals (4/33; 12%) but in none of the non-exposed individuals (0/9). The overall occurrence of hypermethylation (measured both as methylation index and as number of genes affected) was similar in those ever exposed to tobacco smoke (smokers, SHS-exposed never-smokers) and differed from non-exposed never-smokers. In multivariate analysis, p16 hypermethylation was more prevalent in lung tumours from male than female patients (P = 0.018) and in squamous cell carcinomas than in adenocarcinomas (P = 0.025). Occurrence of TP53 mutation in the tumour was associated with hypermethylation of at least one gene (P = 0.027). In all, our data suggest that promoter hypermethylation pattern in SHS-exposed never-smokers resembles that observed in smokers. Association between TP53 mutation, a hallmark of smokers' lung cancer, and methylation of one or more of the lung cancer-related genes studied, provides further evidence for common tobacco smoke-related origin for both types of molecular alterations.
    Mutagenesis 01/2012; 27(4):423-9. · 3.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lung cancer has the highest mortality rate of all of the cancers in the world and asbestos-related lung cancer is one of the leading occupational cancers. The identification of asbestos-related molecular changes has long been a topic of increasing research interest. The aim of this study was to identify novel asbestos-related molecular correlates by integrating miRNA expression profiling with previously obtained profiling data (aCGH and mRNA expression) from the same patient material. miRNA profiling was performed on 26 tumor and corresponding normal lung tissue samples from highly asbestos-exposed and non-exposed patients, and on eight control lung tissue samples. Data analyses on miRNA expression, and integration of miRNA and previously obtained mRNA data were performed using Chipster. A separate analysis was used to integrate miRNA and previously obtained aCGH data. Both known and new lung cancer-associated miRNAs and target genes with inverse correlation were discovered. Furthermore, DNA copy number alterations (e.g., gain at 12p13.31) were correlated with the deregulated miRNAs. Specifically, thirteen novel asbestos-related miRNAs (over-expressed: miR-148b, miR-374a, miR-24-1*, Let-7d, Let-7e, miR-199b-5p, miR-331-3p, and miR-96 and under-expressed: miR-939, miR-671-5p, miR-605, miR-1224-5p and miR-202) and inversely correlated target genes (e.g., GADD45A, LTBP1, FOSB, NCALD, CACNA2D2, MTSS1, EPB41L3) were identified. In addition, over-expression of the well known squamous cell carcinoma-associated miR-205 was linked to down-regulation of the DOK4 gene. The miRNAs/genes presented here may represent interesting targets for further investigation and could eventually have potential diagnostic implications.
    Genes Chromosomes and Cancer 08/2011; 50(8):585-97. · 3.55 Impact Factor
  • Sisko Anttila, Hannu Raunio, Jukka Hakkola
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    ABSTRACT: Lung cancer is strongly associated with exogenous risk factors, in particular tobacco smoking and asbestos exposure. New research data are accumulating about the regulation of the metabolism of tobacco carcinogens and the metabolic response to oxidative stress. These data provide mechanistic details about why well known risk factors cause lung cancer. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the present knowledge of the role of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the metabolism of tobacco carcinogens and associations with tobacco and asbestos carcinogenesis. Major emphasis is placed on human data and regulatory pathways involved in CYP regulation and lung carcinogenesis. The most exciting new research findings concern cross-talk of the CYP-regulating aryl hydrocarbon receptor with other transcription factors, such as nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2, involved in the regulation of xenobiotic metabolism and antioxidant enzymes. This cross-talk between transcription factors may provide mechanistic evidence for clinically relevant issues, such as differences in lung cancers between men and women and the synergism between tobacco and asbestos as lung carcinogens.
    American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology 11/2010; 44(5):583-90. · 4.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Five to seven percent of lung tumours are estimated to occur because of occupational asbestos exposure. Using cDNA microarrays, we have earlier detected asbestos exposure-related genomic regions in lung cancer. The region at 2p was one of those that differed most between asbestos-exposed and non-exposed patients. Now, we evaluated genomic alterations at 2p22.1-p16.1 as a possible marker for asbestos exposure. Lung tumours from 205 patients with pulmonary asbestos fibre counts from 0 to 570 million fibres per gram of dry lung, were studied by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) for DNA copy number alterations (CNA). The prevalence of loss at 2p16, shown by three different FISH probes, was significantly increased in lung tumours of asbestos-exposed patients compared with non-exposed (P=0.05). In addition, a low copy number loss at 2p16 associated significantly with high-level asbestos exposure (P=0.02). Furthermore, 27 of the tumours were studied for allelic imbalances (AI) at 2p22.1-p16.1 using 14 microsatellite markers and also AI at 2p16 was related to asbestos exposure (P=0.003). Our results suggest that alterations at 2p16 combined with other markers could be useful in diagnosing asbestos-related lung cancer.
    British Journal of Cancer 04/2009; 100(8):1336-42. · 5.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Asbestos causes DNA damage and the fibers, together with tobacco smoke, have a synergistic effect on lung cancer risk. We recently identified 18 chromosomal regions that showed differences in DNA copy number between the lung tumors of asbestos-exposed and nonexposed patients. One of the previously identified asbestos-associated chromosomal regions at 9q was further analyzed for allelic imbalance and DNA copy number alterations (CNA) in the lung tumors of asbestos-exposed and nonexposed patients. In addition, the ploidy level of the tumors was studied. Allelic imbalance was analyzed at 9q31.3-34.3 with 15 microsatellite markers in 52 lung tumor samples from asbestos-exposed and nonexposed patients. CNA at 9q32-34.3 were characterized by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with six bacterial artificial chromosome probes in 95 lung tumors. The ploidy level was analyzed in 100 lung tumors with FISH using three to five centromere probes. Allelic imbalance at 9q31.3-q34.3 was found in all asbestos-exposed patient tumors (100%, 17 of 17) compared with 64% (14 of 22) in the nonexposed cases (P = 0.005). The most significant difference was detected at 9q33.1 (P = 0.002). FISH results showed that also CNA were more frequent at 9q33.1 in the three major histologic types of non-small-cell lung tumors of exposed patients, and the association showed a dose-dependent trend (P = 0.03). Furthermore, we detected more frequent polyploidy among the exposed (48%, 28 of 58) than among the nonexposed (29%, 12 of 42) patient tumors (P < 0.05). These results provide a basis for the development of a method to identify asbestos-related lung cancer on a molecular level.
    Clinical Cancer Research 02/2009; 15(2):468-75. · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Studies on asbestos-induced tumourigenesis have indicated the role of, e.g., reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, mitochondria, as well as NF-kappaB and MAPK signalling pathways. The exact molecular mechanisms contributing to asbestos-mediated carcinogenesis are, however, still to be characterized. In this study, gene expression data analyses together with gene annotation data from the Gene Ontology (GO) database were utilized to identify pathways that are differentially regulated in lung and tumour tissues between asbestos-exposed and non-exposed lung cancer patients. Differentially regulated pathways were identified from gene expression data from 14 asbestos-exposed and 14 non-exposed lung cancer patients using custom-made software and Iterative Group Analysis (iGA). Western blotting was used to further characterize the findings, specifically to determine the protein levels of UBA1 and UBA7. Differences between asbestos-related and non-related lung tumours were detected in pathways associated with, e.g., ion transport, NF-kappaB signalling, DNA repair, as well as spliceosome and nucleosome complexes. A notable fraction of the pathways down-regulated in both normal and tumour tissue of the asbestos-exposed patients were related to protein ubiquitination, a versatile process regulating, for instance, DNA repair, cell cycle, and apoptosis, and thus being also a significant contributor of carcinogenesis. Even though UBA1 or UBA7, the early enzymes involved in protein ubiquitination and ubiquitin-like regulation of target proteins, did not underlie the exposure-related deregulation of ubiquitination, a difference was detected in the UBA1 and UBA7 levels between squamous cell carcinomas and respective normal lung tissue (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01) without regard to exposure status. Our results indicate alterations in protein ubiquitination related both to cancer type and asbestos. We present for the first time pathway analysis results on asbestos-associated lung cancer, providing important insight into the most relevant targets for future research.
    BMC Medical Genomics 12/2008; 1:55. · 3.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gene-environment interactions have been extensively studied in lung cancer. It is likely that several genetic polymorphisms cooperate in increasing the individual risk. Therefore, the study of gene-gene interactions might be important to identify high-susceptibility subgroups. GSEC is an initiative aimed at collecting available data sets on metabolic polymorphisms and the risks of cancer at several sites and performing pooled analyses of the original data. Authors of published papers have provided original data sets. The present paper refers to gene-gene interactions in lung cancer and considers three polymorphisms in three metabolic genes: CYP1A1, GSTM1 and GSTT1. The present analyses compare the gene gene interactions of the CYP1A1*2A, GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms from studies on lung cancer conducted in Europe and the USA between 1991 and 2000. Only Caucasians have been included. The data set includes 1466 cases and 1488 controls. The only clear-cut association was found with CYP1A1*2A. This association remained unchanged after stratification by polymorphisms in other genes (with an odds ratio [OR] of approximately 2.5), except when interaction with GSTM1 was considered. When the OR for CYP1A1*2A was stratified according to the GSTM1 genotype, the OR was increased only among the subjects who had the null (homozygous deletion) GSTM1 genotype (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 0.9-8.4). The odds ratio for the interactive term (CYP1A1*2A by GSTM1) in logistic regression was 2.7 (95% CI = 0.5-15.3). An association between lung cancer and the homozygous CYP1A1*2A genotype is confirmed. An apparent and biologically plausible interaction is suggested between this genotype and GSTM1.
    Biomarkers 10/2008; 9(3):298-305. · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Asbestos-exposure is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, one of the leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Asbestos is known to induce DNA and chromosomal damage as well as aberrations in signalling pathways, such as the MAPK and NF-kappaB cascades, crucial for cellular homeostasis. The alterations result from both indirect effects through e.g. reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and direct mechanical disturbances of cellular constituents. This review describes the current knowledge on genomic and pathway aberrations characterizing asbestos-related lung cancer. Specific asbestos-associated molecular signatures can assist the development of early biomarkers, molecular diagnosis, and molecular targeted treatments for asbestos-exposed lung cancer patients.
    Cancer Letters 07/2008; 265(1):1-15. · 5.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Exposure to asbestos is known to induce lung cancer, and our previous studies have suggested that specific chromosomal regions, such as 19p13, are preferentially aberrant in lung tumours of asbestos-exposed patients. Here, we further examined the association between the 19p region and exposure to asbestos using array comparative genomic hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in lung tumours and FISH characterization of asbestos-induced micronuclei (MN) in human bronchial epithelial BEAS 2B cells in vitro. We detected an increased number of 19p losses in the tumours of asbestos-exposed patients in comparison with tumours from non-exposed subjects with similar distribution of tumour histology in both groups (13/33; 39% versus 3/25; 12%, P = 0.04). In BEAS 2B cells, a 48 h exposure to crocidolite asbestos (2.0 microg/cm(2)) was found to induce centromere-negative MN-harbouring chromosomal fragments. Furthermore, an increased frequency of rare MN containing a 19p fragment was observed after the crocidolite treatment in comparison with untreated controls (6/6000 versus 1/10 000, P = 0.01). The results suggest that 19p has significance in asbestos-associated carcinogenesis and that asbestos may be capable of inducing specific chromosome aberrations.
    Carcinogenesis 06/2008; 29(5):913-7. · 5.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To test the hypothesis of interaction among genetic variants in increasing the individual risk of cancer, we have studied the cumulative effect on lung cancer risk of variants in three metabolic genes, CYP1A1, GSTM1 and GSTT1, which are involved in the metabolism of the tobacco smoke constituents and environmental contaminants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and of other lung carcinogens. We have selected from the Genetic Susceptibility to Environmental Carcinogens pooled analysis all the studies on lung cancer conducted after 1991 in which all variants were available. The data set includes 611 cases and 870 controls. We found a cumulative effect of the combination of the a priori 'at-risk' alleles for these genes (P for trend 0.004). The risk of lung cancer was increased with the combination of CYP1A1*2B or CYP1A1*4 alleles and the double deletion of both GSTM1 and GSTT1 up to an odds ratio (OR) of 8.25 (95% confidence interval 2.29-29.77) for the combination including CYP1A1*4; among never smokers, the latter combination was associated with an OR of 16.19 (1.90-137). Estimates did not change after adjustment by the number of cigarettes smoked and duration of smoking were consistent across ethnicities and were approximately the same for adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. These observations from a large pooled analysis strongly suggest the existence of gene-gene interactions in lung carcinogenesis. People with rare combinations of common gene variants have a high risk of cancer and can be assimilated to subjects with highly penetrant mutations.
    Carcinogenesis 10/2007; 28(9):1902-5. · 5.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Asbestos is a pulmonary carcinogen known to give rise to DNA and chromosomal damage, but the exact carcinogenic mechanisms are still largely unknown. In this study, gene expression arrays were performed on lung tumor samples from 14 heavily asbestos-exposed and 14 non-exposed patients matched for other characteristics. Using a two-step statistical analysis, 47 genes were revealed that could differentiate the tumors of asbestos-exposed from those of non-exposed patients. To identify asbestos-associated regions with DNA copy number and expressional changes, the gene expression data were combined with comparative genomic hybridization microarray data. As a result, a combinatory profile of DNA copy number aberrations and expressional changes significantly associated with asbestos exposure was obtained. Asbestos-related areas were detected in 2p21-p16.3, 3p21.31, 5q35.2-q35.3, 16p13.3, 19p13.3-p13.1 and 22q12.3-q13.1. The most prominent of these, 19p13, was further characterized by microsatellite analysis in 62 patients for the differences in allelic imbalance (AI) between the two groups of lung tumors. 79% of the exposed and 45% of the non-exposed patients (P=0.008) were found to be carriers of AI in their lung tumors. In the exposed group, AI in 19p was prevalent regardless of the histological tumor type. In adenocarcinomas, AI in 19p appeared to occur independently of the asbestos exposure.
    Oncogene 08/2007; 26(32):4730-7. · 8.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Asbestos has been shown to cause chromosomal damage and DNA aberrations. Exposure to asbestos causes many lung diseases e.g. asbestosis, malignant mesothelioma, and lung cancer, but the disease-related processes are still largely unknown. We exposed the human cell lines A549, Beas-2B and Met5A to crocidolite asbestos and determined time-dependent gene expression profiles by using Affymetrix arrays. The hybridization data was analyzed by using an algorithm specifically designed for clustering of short time series expression data. A canonical correlation analysis was applied to identify correlations between the cell lines, and a Gene Ontology analysis method for the identification of enriched, differentially expressed biological processes. We recognized a large number of previously known as well as new potential asbestos-associated genes and biological processes, and identified chromosomal regions enriched with genes potentially contributing to common responses to asbestos in these cell lines. These include genes such as the thioredoxin domain containing gene (TXNDC) and the potential tumor suppressor, BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19kD-interacting protein gene (BNIP3L), GO-terms such as "positive regulation of I-kappaB kinase/NF-kappaB cascade" and "positive regulation of transcription, DNA-dependent", and chromosomal regions such as 2p22, 9p13, and 14q21. We present the complete data sets as Additional files. This study identifies several interesting targets for further investigation in relation to asbestos-associated diseases.
    BMC Genomics 02/2007; 8:62. · 4.40 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Thoracic Oncology - J THORAC ONCOL. 01/2007; 2.
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    ABSTRACT: Conventional cytogenetic analyses and comparative genomic hybridization have revealed a complex and even chaotic nature of chromosomal aberrations in pleural malignant mesothelioma (MM). We set out to describe the complex gene copy number changes and screen for novel genetic aberrations using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray platform for comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) of a series of 26 well-characterized MM tumor samples. The number of copy number changes varied from zero to 40 per sample. Gene copy number losses predominated over gains, and the most frequent region of loss was 9p21.3 (17/26 cases), the locus of CDKN2A and CDKN2B, both known to be commonly lost in MM. The most recurrent minimal regions of losses were 1p31.1--> p13.2, 3p22.1-->p14.2, 6q22.1, 9p21.3, 13cen-->q14.12, 14q22.1-->qter, and 22qcen-->q12.3. Previously unreported gains included 9p13.3, 7p22.3-->p22.2, 12q13.3, and 17q21.32-->qter. The results suggest that gene copy number losses are a major mechanism of MM carcinogenesis and reveal a recurrent pattern of copy number changes in MM.
    Cytogenetic and Genome Research 01/2007; 119(1-2):46-52. · 1.84 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Thoracic Oncology - J THORAC ONCOL. 01/2007; 2.

Publication Stats

4k Citations
507.91 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • Vilnius University
      • Gamtos mokslų fakultetas
      Vilnius, Vilniaus Apskritis, Lithuania
  • 2005–2012
    • Helsinki University Central Hospital
      • Department of Pathology
      Helsinki, Province of Southern Finland, Finland
  • 1989–2009
    • Finnish Institute of Occupational Health
      • Centre of Expertise for Health and Work Ability
      Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
  • 2008
    • Imperial College London
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2007
    • Università degli Studi di Torino
      Torino, Piedmont, Italy
  • 1997–2006
    • University of Helsinki
      • • Department of Pathology
      • • Department of Medical Genetics
      Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
  • 2000
    • University of Tampere
      • Department of Surgery
      Tampere, Western Finland, Finland
    • University of California, Los Angeles
      Los Angeles, California, United States
  • 1984–1998
    • University of Oulu
      • • Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology
      • • Department of Pathology
      Oulu, Oulu, Finland
  • 1992–1995
    • International Agency for Research on Cancer
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • 1988
    • Oulu University Hospital
      Uleoborg, Oulu, Finland