A L Bañuls

Institute of Research for Development, Marsiglia, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France

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Publications (40)124.57 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: In sub-Saharan Africa, bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a potential hazard for animals and humans health. The goal of this study was to improve our understanding of bTB epidemiology in Burkina Faso and especially Mycobacterium bovis transmission within and between the bovine and human populations.
    PLoS neglected tropical diseases. 10/2014; 8(10):e3142.
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    ABSTRACT: For numerous infectious diseases affecting humans, clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic forms to severe pathologies. The originality of this study was its focus on asymptomatic carriers (ACs) of Leishmania infantum in southern France. The fundamental interest in these ACs is that they can be a reservoir of potentially pathogenic microorganisms. It remains to be established whether the parasitic genomes from ACs differ from those of patients. Multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT) was used to investigate the genetic variation among 36 French strains of L. infantum. Nine Leishmania strains isolated from blood donors (ACs) were compared with 27 strains of L. infantum belonging to zymodemes, MON 1, 33 and 183. These strains were isolated from HIV positive or negative patients with visceral leishmaniasis (VL), cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), from canine leishmaniasis (CanL) or from phlebotomine sandflies. MLMT data generated using 33 loci were analyzed by a Bayesian model-based clustering algorithm and construction of a phylogenetic tree based on genetic distances. Both analyses structured the MON-1 sample into two main clusters. Furthermore, genetic analysis demonstrated that these nine AC strains are divided into two clusters grouped with the MON-1 strains. One cluster with seven strains is related to, but different from, human symptomatic strains from the Alpes-Maritimes region whereas the other cluster has the two remaining strains together with CanL strains as well as one strain from a VL patient. Genetic diversity among AC was very weak since the nine Leishmania strains belong to only two genotypes. Genetic differentiations were evidenced between AC strains and non-AC strains and especially between AC and HIV+ populations, although these findings require confirmation with a larger sample size. We believe that our data explore for the first time, the genetic diversity among L. infantum from asymptomatic human carriers and reveal a weak polymorphism compared with Leishmania parasites isolated from human patients.
    International journal for parasitology 02/2013; · 3.39 Impact Factor
  • Veterinary Parasitology: Concepts, Diseases and Case Studies, Edited by Hany M Elsheikha, 01/2013; Garland Science, Taylor and Francis group.
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents the first evaluation of the molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Peru. We characterised 323 isolates using spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units variable number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. We aimed to determine the levels of genetic diversity and genetic differentiation among and within Peruvian isolates and the epidemiological factors which may be driving patterns of population structure and evolution of M. tuberculosis in Peru. Our results compared to the fourth international spoligotyping database (SpolDB4) and MIRU-VNTRplus, show that the main M. tuberculosis families present are Latin American-Mediterranean, Haarlem, T, and Beijing. Bayesian clustering recovered 15 groups in the Peruvian M. tuberculosis isolates, among which two were composed mainly of orphans, implying the presence of native "Peruvian" strains not previously reported. Variable levels of association with drug resistance were observed, with Beijing genotypes not showing any association with multidrug resistance, while in other groups MIRU-VNTR loci 2, 23, 31, and 40 were found to be associated with the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) phenotype, suggesting that a linkage disequibrium between these MIRU and drug resistance loci may be present. Genetic differentiation was present among drug resistant and sensitive strains. Ethambutol appeared to be the main driver of differentiation, suggesting that strong selection pressure could have been exerted by drug treatment in Peru over recent years.
    Infection, genetics and evolution: journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases 02/2012; 12(3):577-85. · 3.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This review gives an update of current knowledge on the clinical pleiomorphism of Leishmania, with a special emphasis on the case of asymptomatic carriage. The first part describes the numerous unusual expressions of the disease that occur besides the classic (visceral, cutaneous, and mucocutaneous) forms of leishmaniases. The second part deals with progress in the understanding of disease outcome in humans, and the possible future approaches to improve our knowledge in the field. The third part highlights the role of the too often neglected asymptomatic carrier compartment. This group could be key to understanding infraspecific differences in virulence and pathogenicity of the parasite, as well as identifying the genetic determinants involved in the expression of the disease.
    Clinical Microbiology and Infection 10/2011; 17(10):1451-61. · 4.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Whereas Leishmania infantum, the agent of visceral leishmaniasis (VL), is well known in North Africa, very limited data exist on its spread in West Africa, where mainly cutaneous leishmaniasis has been widely reported. Nevertheless, dogs infected with L. infantum were recently found in the Mont Rolland District in Senegal. To provide a better understanding of L. infantum epidemiology in this area, clinical and serological surveys were carried out to determine the seroprevalence of L. infantum-specific antibodies in the human population. In parallel, an analysis of environmental and individual factors associated with Leishmania antigen seropositivity was conducted to identify potential risk factors for exposure. Although no cases of VL were detected within this study, a large part of the population (73/315; 23%) was exposed to infection, with a strong age effect (being >40 years old increased the risk of being seropositive). Moreover, the presence of Nebedaye trees (Moringa oleifera) and infected dogs in the household were factors increasing the risk of exposure in household members. These results may provide important information to identify the still unknown sandfly species involved in transmission.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 06/2011; 105(6):333-40. · 1.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the context of global warming and the risk of spreading arthropod-borne diseases, the emergence and reemergence of leishmaniasis should not be neglected. In Senegal, over the past few years, cases of canine leishmaniasis have been observed. We aim to improve the understanding of the transmission cycle of this zoonosis, to determine the responsible species and to evaluate the risk for human health. An epidemiological and serological study on canine and human populations in the community of Mont Rolland (Thiès area) was conducted. The data showed a high seroprevalence of canine leishmaniasis (>40%) and more than 30% seropositive people. The dogs' seroprevalence was confirmed by PCR data (concordance > 0.85, Kappa > 0.7). The statistical analysis showed strong statistical associations between the health status of dogs and seropositivity, the number of positive PCRs, clinical signs and the number of Leishmania isolates. For the first time, the discriminative PCRs performed on canine Leishmania strains clearly evidenced that the pathogenic agent is Leishmania infantum. The results obtained show that transmission of this species is well established in this area. That the high incidence of seropositivity in humans may be a consequence of infection with this species is discussed.
    Microbes and Infection 12/2010; 12(14-15):1219-25. · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We used 12 microsatellite markers developed for Leishmania braziliensis to genotype 28 strains of the main species of the Leishmania guyanensis complex (i.e. L. guyanensis and L. panamensis) collected in Ecuador and Peru. The important heterozygote deficits observed in these populations are similar with the previous data obtained in L. braziliensis and raise again the debate on the reproductive mode of these protozoan parasites. The data showed genetic polymorphism and geographical differentiation giving information on population structure of the L. guyanensis complex. Regarding the two species, this study enhances again the debate on the taxonomic status of the different isolates belonging to L. guyanensis s.l. since the results showed substantial heterogeneity within this species complex. In conclusion, this study increases the number of available microsatellite loci for L. guyanensis species complex and raises fundamental biological questions. It confirms that microsatellite markers constitute good tools for population genetic studies on parasites of this complex.
    Parasitology 11/2010; 137(13):1879-84. · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A new clonal complex of Mycobacterium bovis present at high frequency in cattle from west central African countries has been described as the African 1 (Af1) clonal complex. Here, the first intrafamilial cluster of human tuberculosis cases due to M. bovis Af1 clonal complex strains is reported. We discuss hypotheses regarding modes of transmission.
    Journal of clinical microbiology 10/2010; 48(12):4680-3. · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium microti is rare, but its prevalence and clinical significance may have been underestimated. To the best of our knowledge, 21 cases have been reported in the literature in the last decade. We report six recent pulmonary cases caused by M. microti over a period of 5 years detected in French clinical mycobacteriology laboratories of the hospital network. Our data confirm the potential of M. microti to cause clinical illness in immunocompetent patients. M. microti grew slowly from specimens, delaying the final microbiological diagnosis. Therefore, patients with tuberculosis caused by M. microti could benefit from the use of rapid diagnostic molecular techniques directly on clinical samples. From a review of the literature and this study, a classical antituberculous therapy seems effective in treating patients with M. microti disease.
    Journal of Medical Microbiology 08/2010; 59(Pt 8):984-9. · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    Microbes and Infection 01/2010; · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Djibouti is an East African country with a high tuberculosis incidence. This study was conducted over a 2-month period in Djibouti, during which 62 consecutive patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) were included. Genetic characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit variable-number tandem-repeat typing and spoligotyping, was performed. The genetic and phylogenetic analysis revealed only three major families (Central Asian, East African Indian and T). The high diversity and linkage disequilibrium within each family suggest a long period of clonal evolution. A Bayesian approach shows that the phylogenetic structure observed in our sample of 62 isolates is very likely to be representative of the phylogenetic structure of the M. tuberculosis population in the total number of TB cases.
    Clinical Microbiology and Infection 09/2009; 16(7):1023-6. · 4.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Twelve microsatellite loci of Leishmania braziliensis were examined, nine of which were developed in this work. Fifty-six Leishmania braziliensis were genotyped with these microsatellite loci. The 12 loci studied were polymorphic with the number of alleles ranging from five to 19, with a mean of 9.7 ± 4.1 and the observed heterozygosity averaging 0.425 ± 0.202. The important heterozygote deficits we observed (F(IS) = 0.41, P value = 0.004) appear incompatible with the heterozygote excess expected in clonal diploids. This last result could revive the clonality/sexuality debate regarding Leishmania. This work validates the potential use of these microsatellites for population genetics analysis.
    Molecular Ecology Resources 03/2008; 8(2):351-3. · 7.43 Impact Factor
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    M Hide, A L Bañuls
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    ABSTRACT: In leishmaniasis, cysteine protease b (cpb) multicopy genes have been extensively studied because of their implication in host-parasite interactions. In the Leishmania donovani complex, responsible for visceral leishmaniasis, a set of interesting polymorphisms has been revealed, such as copy sequence or expression according to the parasite's life stage. The single nucleotide polymorphisms observed among these copies could be related to clinical characteristics such as dermotropic versus viscerotropic status. CPB COOH-terminal extension (CTE) is mainly responsible for genetic variability among the copies and appears highly immunogenic. These results suggest that further study of the role of CPBs, especially CTE in clinical outcome, is warranted.
    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 03/2008; 102(2):105-6. · 1.82 Impact Factor
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    M Hide, R Singh, B Kumar, A L Bañuls, S Sundar
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    ABSTRACT: Current procedures for diagnosing Leishmania parasites from patients involve invasive and dangerous tissue aspiration. We have developed a non-invasive and highly sensitive microculture method that can isolate parasites from the buffy coat of the patient's peripheral blood. The parasites were cultured in 96-well culture plates. Nineteen parasitologically proven visceral leishmaniasis (VL) patients were included in the study. Using this technique, we were able to isolate parasites from 16 (84%) samples. However, all 19 (100%) samples were positive on culture of splenic aspirates. We conclude that this technique is useful for the isolation and cryoconservation of parasites from patients' blood. This simple method could be tried as a first-instance alternative before other more sensitive procedures such as splenic aspirate; however, negative results should be confirmed by tests with higher sensitivity.
    Acta Tropica 07/2007; 102(3):197-200. · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We conducted a molecular epidemiology study on 120 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients presenting pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in Burkina Faso. Classical antibiogram studies and genetic characterization, using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing and spoligotyping, were applied after culture. Molecular analysis of specific signatures showed that all TB cases reported in this study were caused by M. tuberculosis and identified no Mycobacterium bovis or Mycobacterium africanum isolates. This result is unexpected, as M. africanum strains were reportedly the etiologic agent in 20% of TB cases 2 decades ago. The comparison of spoligotypes from Burkina Faso with an international spoligotype database (SpolDB4) showed that the majority of isolates belong to major clades of M. tuberculosis (Haarlem, 9%; Latin American-Mediterranean, 30%; and T, 20%). The predominant group of isolates (30%) corresponds to spoligotype 61, described in Cameroon as the "Cameroon family." In Burkina Faso, as in Cameroon, this family could be associated with recent transmission of TB, suggesting a recent expansion in West Africa. Our data suggest a low level of primary drug resistance that may be a positive result of the Directly Observed Therapy Shortcourse program. Besides, based on spoligotyping plus MIRU-VNTR, data showed a high number of clusters in our sample, suggesting a high level of recent TB transmission in Burkina Faso. Nevertheless, an important genetic polymorphism was observed in this country, reflecting an endemicity situation where the control of TB would have less impact in the main towns.
    Journal of Clinical Microbiology 04/2007; 45(3):921-7. · 4.07 Impact Factor
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    M Hide, R Bras-Gonçalves, A L Bañuls
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    ABSTRACT: Leishmania infantum and Leishmania donovani both pertain to the L. (L.) donovani complex and are responsible for visceral leishmaniasis. To explore the L. donovani complex, we focused our study on cysteine protease B (cpb) and especially on 2 cpb copies: cpbE and cpbF. We selected cpb genes because of their phylogenetic interest and host-parasite interaction involvement. Sequencing these 2 copies revealed (i) that cpbE is specific to L. infantum and cpbF is specific to L. donovani and (ii) that these 2 copies are different in length and sequence. Phylogenetic analysis and protein predictions were carried out in order to compare these copies (i) with other trypanosomatid cpb, especially L. mexicana, and (ii) within the L. donovani complex. Our results revealed patterns specific to the L. donovani complex such as the COOH-terminal extension, potential epitopes and N-glycosylation sites. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis revealed different levels of polymorphism between L. infantum and L. donovani and confirmed the ancestral status of the latter. L. infantum has a shorter sequence and a deleted sequence responsible for modifications in protein conformation and catalytic triad. Considering the clinical aspect, L. infantum dermotropic strains appeared more polymorphic than L. infantum viscerotropic strains.
    Parasitology 04/2007; 134(Pt 3):379-89. · 2.36 Impact Factor
  • Tropical Medicine & International Health 01/2007; · 2.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Multi-locus enzyme electrophoresis is the current gold standard for the genetic characterisation of Leishmania. However, this method is time-consuming and, more importantly, cannot be directly applied to parasites present in host tissue. PCR-based methods represent an ideal alternative but, to date, a multi-locus analysis has not been applied to the same sample. This has now been achieved with a sample of 55 neotropical isolates (Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, L. (V.) peruviana, L. (V.) guyanensis, L. (V.) lainsoni and L. (L.) amazonensis), using five different genes as targets, four of which encoded major Leishmania antigens (gp63, Hsp70, H2B and Cpb). Our multi-locus approach strongly supports the current taxonomy and demonstrates a highly robust method of distinguishing different strains. Within L. (V.) braziliensis, we did not encounter so far specific genetic differences between parasites isolated from cutaneous and mucosal lesions. Interestingly, results provided by each of the different antigen-genes in the species considered, were different, suggesting different selective pressures. Our work emphasises the need for a multi-disciplinary approach to study the clinical pleomorphism of leishmaniasis.
    Infection Genetics and Evolution 04/2005; 5(2):109-16. · 2.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The majority of Toxoplasma gondii strains from a variety of human and animal sources have been grouped into three highly clonal but closely related lineages. The low occurrence of nucleotide differences among the three predominant lineages and their unusual dimorphic allelic composition suggest that they have arisen from a recent common ancestry. Less than 1% of the previously studied strains contain unique genotypes and high divergence of DNA sequence, and therefore are considered 'exotic' or 'atypical' strains. The seemingly low genetic diversity in T. gondii may have been underestimated because most parasite strains in previous studies were collected from human patients and domestic animals in North America and Europe. To investigate the genetic diversity of T. gondii, we analysed parasite strains isolated from remote geographical regions by multilocus microsatellite sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The genetic diversity indices, the molecular analysis of microsatellite genotypes and the constructed phylogram considered together suggest that the global T. gondii population is highly diversified and not characteristic of a clonal organism. The most parsimonious hypothesis is that T. gondii presents a complex population structure with a mix of clonal and sexual propagation as a function of the environmental conditions. The comparison between domestic strains data on one hand and wild strains data on the other hand is in favour of more frequent sexual recombinations in wild environment even though Toxoplasma subpopulation in human and domestic animals is largely clonal.
    International Journal for Parasitology 10/2004; 34(10):1185-96. · 3.64 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
124.57 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2000–2013
    • Institute of Research for Development
      Marsiglia, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
    • University Hospital of Lausanne
      Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland
  • 2009–2011
    • Université de Montpellier 1
      Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
  • 2007
    • Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montpellier
      Montpelhièr, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
  • 1997–2001
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 1999
    • Institute of Tropical Medicine
      • Department of Clinical Sciences
      Antwerpen, VLG, Belgium