M E Itoiz

University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires F.D., Argentina

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Publications (105)151.93 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background. We previously demonstrated the therapeutic success of sequential boron neutron capture therapy (Seq-BNCT) in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. It consists of BPA-BNCT followed by GB-10-BNCT 24 or 48 hours later. Additionally, we proved that tumor blood vessel normalization with thalidomide prior to BPA-BNCT improves tumor control. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and explore potential boron microdistribution changes in Seq-BNCT preceded by tumor blood vessel normalization. Material and Methods. Tumor bearing animals were treated with thalidomide for tumor blood vessel normalization, followed by Seq-BNCT (Th+ Seq-BNCT) or Seq-Beam Only (Th+ Seq-BO) in the window of normalization. Boron microdistribution was assessed by neutron autoradiography. Results. Th+ Seq-BNCT induced overall tumor response of 100%, with 87 (4)% complete tumor response. No cases of severe mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue were observed. Differences in boron homogeneity between tumors pre-treated and not pre-treated with thalidomide were observed. Conclusion. Th+ Seq-BNCT achieved, for the first time, response in all treated tumors. Increased homogeneity in tumor boron microdistribution is associated to an improvement in tumor control.
    Acta oncologica (Stockholm, Sweden) 06/2014; · 2.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BNCT was proposed for the treatment of diffuse, non-resectable tumors in the lung. We performed boron biodistribution studies with 5 administration protocols employing the boron carriers BPA and/or GB-10 in an experimental model of disseminated lung metastases in rats. All 5 protocols were non-toxic and showed preferential tumor boron uptake versus lung. Absolute tumor boron concentration values were therapeutically useful (25-76ppm) for 3 protocols. Dosimetric calculations indicate that BNCT at RA-3 would be potentially therapeutic without exceeding radiotolerance in the lung.
    Applied radiation and isotopes: including data, instrumentation and methods for use in agriculture, industry and medicine 12/2013; · 1.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was proposed for untreatable colorectal liver metastases. Employing an experimental model of liver metastases in rats, we recently demonstrated that BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA-BNCT) at 13 Gy prescribed to tumor is therapeutically useful at 3-week follow-up. The aim of the present study was to evaluate dose-response at 5-week follow-up, based on retrospective dose assessment in individual rats. BDIX rats were inoculated with syngeneic colon cancer cells DHD/K12/TRb. Tumor-bearing animals were divided into three groups: BPA-BNCT (n = 19), Beam only (n = 8) and Sham (n = 7) (matched manipulation, no treatment). For each rat, neutron flux was measured in situ and boron content was measured in a pre-irradiation blood sample for retrospective individual dose assessment. For statistical analysis (ANOVA), individual data for the BPA-BNCT group were pooled according to absorbed tumor dose, BPA-BNCT I: 4.5-8.9 Gy and BPA-BNCT II: 9.2-16 Gy. At 5 weeks post-irradiation, the tumor surface area post-treatment/pre-treatment ratio was 12.2 ± 6.6 for Sham, 7.8 ± 4.1 for Beam only, 4.4 ± 5.6 for BPA-BNCT I and 0.45 ± 0.20 for BPA-BNCT II; tumor nodule weight was 750 ± 480 mg for Sham, 960 ± 620 mg for Beam only, 380 ± 720 mg for BPA-BNCT I and 7.3 ± 5.9 mg for BPA-BNCT II. The BPA-BNCT II group exhibited statistically significant tumor control with no contributory liver toxicity. Potential threshold doses for tumor response and significant tumor control were established at 6.1 and 9.2 Gy, respectively.
    Biophysik 09/2013; · 1.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on selective accumulation of (10)B carriers in tumor followed by neutron irradiation. We previously proved the therapeutic success of BNCT mediated by the boron compounds boronophenylalanine and sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Based on the clinical relevance of the boron carrier sodium borocaptate (BSH) and the knowledge that the most effective way to optimize BNCT is to improve tumor boron targeting, the specific aim of this study was to perform biodistribution studies of BSH in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model and evaluate the feasibility of BNCT mediated by BSH at nuclear reactor RA-3. The general aim of these studies is to contribute to the knowledge of BNCT radiobiology and optimize BNCT for head and neck cancer. Sodium borocaptate (50 mg (10)B/kg) was administered to tumor-bearing hamsters. Groups of 3-5 animals were killed humanely at nine time-points, 3-12 h post-administration. Samples of blood, tumor, precancerous pouch tissue, normal pouch tissue and other clinically relevant normal tissues were processed for boron measurement by optic emission spectroscopy. Tumor boron concentration peaked to therapeutically useful boron concentration values of 24-35 ppm. The boron concentration ratio tumor/normal pouch tissue ranged from 1.1 to 1.8. Pharmacokinetic curves showed that the optimum interval between BSH administration and neutron irradiation was 7-11 h. It is concluded that BNCT mediated by BSH at nuclear reactor RA-3 would be feasible.
    Biophysik 04/2013; · 1.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Normalization of tumor blood vessels improves drug and oxygen delivery to cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop a technique to normalize blood vessels in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Tumor-bearing hamsters were treated with thalidomide and were compared with controls. Twenty eight hours after treatment with thalidomide, the blood vessels of premalignant tissue observable in vivo became narrower and less tortuous than those of controls; Evans Blue Dye extravasation in tumor was significantly reduced (indicating a reduction in aberrant tumor vascular hyperpermeability that compromises blood flow), and tumor blood vessel morphology in histological sections, labeled for Factor VIII, revealed a significant reduction in compressive forces. These findings indicated blood vessel normalization with a window of 48 h. The technique developed herein has rendered the hamster oral cancer model amenable to research, with the potential benefit of vascular normalization in head and neck cancer therapy.
    Anticancer research 07/2012; 32(7):2703-9. · 1.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was proposed for untreatable colorectal liver metastases. The present study evaluates tumor control and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in an experimental model of liver metastasis. BDIX rats were inoculated with syngeneic colon cancer cells DHD/K12/TRb. Tumor-bearing animals were divided into three groups: BPA-BNCT, boronophenylalanine (BPA) + neutron irradiation; Beam only, neutron irradiation; Sham, matched manipulation. The total absorbed dose administered with BPA-BNCT was 13 ± 3 Gy in tumor and 9 ± 2 Gy in healthy liver. Three weeks post-treatment, the tumor surface area post-treatment/pre-treatment ratio was 0.46 ± 0.20 for BPA-BNCT, 2.7 ± 1.8 for Beam only and 4.5 ± 3.1 for Sham. The pre-treatment tumor nodule mass of 48 ± 19 mg fell significantly to 19 ± 16 mg for BPA-BNCT, but rose significantly to 140 ± 106 mg for Beam only and to 346 ± 302 mg for Sham. For both end points, the differences between the BPA-BNCT group and each of the other groups were statistically significant (ANOVA). No clinical, macroscopic or histological normal liver radiotoxicity was observed. It is concluded that BPA-BNCT induced a significant remission of experimental colorectal tumor nodules in liver with no contributory liver toxicity.
    Biophysik 04/2012; 51(3):331-9. · 1.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Blood vessel normalization was induced by two doses of thalidomide in tumor-bearing hamsters on 2 consecutive days. All studies in thalidomide-treated animals were performed 48 h after the first dose of thalidomide, previously established as the window of normalization. Biodistribution studies were performed with BPA at a dose of 15.5 mg (10)B/kg in thalidomide-treated (Th+) and untreated (Th-) tumor-bearing hamsters. The effect of blood vessel normalization prior to BPA administration on the efficacy of BNCT was assessed in in vivo BNCT studies at the RA-3 Nuclear Reactor in tumor-bearing hamsters. Group I was treated with BPA-BNCT after treatment with thalidomide (Th+ BPA-BNCT). Group II was treated with BPA-BNCT alone (Th- BPA-BNCT). Group III was treated with the beam only after treatment with thalidomide (Th+ BO), and Group IV was treated with the beam only (Th- BO). Groups I and II were given the same dose of BPA (15.5 mg (10)B/kg), and all groups (I-IV) were exposed to the same neutron fluence. Two additional groups were treated with the beam only at a higher dose to exacerbate mucositis in precancerous tissue and to explore the potential direct protective effect of thalidomide on radiation-induced mucositis in a scenario of more severe toxicity, i.e. Group V (Th+ hdBO) and Group VI (Th- hdBO). The animals were followed for 28 days. Biodistribution studies revealed no statistically significant differences in gross boron content between Th+ and Th- animals. Overall tumor control (complete response + partial response) at 28 days post-treatment was significantly higher for Group I (Th+ BPA-BNCT) than for Group II (Th- BPA-BNCT): 84 ± 3% compared to 67 ± 5%. Pretreatment with thalidomide did not induce statistically significant changes in overall tumor control induced by the beam only, i.e. 15 ± 5% in Group III (Th+ BO) and 18 ± 5% in Group IV (Th- BO), or in overall tumor control induced by the high-dose beam only, i.e. 60 ± 7% in Group V (Th+ hdBO) and 47 ± 10% in Group VI (Th- hdBO). BPA-BNCT alone (Group II) induced mucositis in precancerous tissue that reached Grades 3-4 in 80% of the animals, whereas pretreatment with thalidomide (Group I) prevented mucositis Grades 3 and 4 completely. Beam-only Group III (Th+ BO) exhibited only Grade 1 mucositis in precancerous tissue, whereas 17% of the animals in beam-only Group IV (Th- BO) reached Grade 2 mucositis. High-dose beam-only group V (Th+ hdBO) exhibited only Grade 2 mucositis, whereas high-dose beam-only group VI (Th- hdBO) reached Grade 3 mucositis in 83% of the animals. In all cases mucositis in precancerous tissue was reversible. No normal tissue radiotoxicity was observed with any of the protocols. Pretreatment with thalidomide enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of BNCT and reduced precancerous tissue toxicity.
    Radiation Research 01/2012; 177(1):59-68. · 2.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Given the clinical relevance of locoregional recurrences in head and neck cancer, we developed a novel experimental model of premalignant tissue in the hamster cheek pouch for long-term studies and demonstrated the partial inhibitory effect of a single application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) on tumor development from premalignant tissue. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a double application of BNCT with a 6 week interval in terms of inhibitory effect on tumor development, toxicity and DNA synthesis. We performed a double application, 6 weeks apart, of (1) BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA-BNCT); (2) BNCT mediated by the combined application of decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) and BPA [(GB-10+BPA)-BNCT] or (3) beam-only, at RA-3 nuclear reactor and followed the animals for 8 months. The control group was cancerized and sham-irradiated. BPA-BNCT, (GB-10+BPA)-BNCT and beam-only induced a reduction in tumor development from premalignant tissue that persisted until 8, 3, and 2 months respectively. An early maximum inhibition of 100% was observed for all 3 protocols. No normal tissue radiotoxicity was detected. Reversible mucositis was observed in premalignant tissue, peaking at 1 week and resolving by the third week after each irradiation. Mucositis after the second application was not exacerbated by the first application. DNA synthesis was significantly reduced in premalignant tissue 8 months post-BNCT. A double application of BPA-BNCT and (GB-10+BPA)-BNCT, 6 weeks apart, could be used therapeutically at no additional cost in terms of radiotoxicity in normal and dose-limiting tissues.
    Oral Oncology 08/2011; 47(11):1017-22. · 2.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to provide evidence that the magnitude of angiogenesis induced by oral mucosa epithelium with potentially malignant lesions is related to the degree of epithelial aggressiveness. We evaluated 96 biopsies that included: (1) leukoplakia with and without dysplasia, (2) nontumoral borders adjacent to squamous cell carcinomas with and without dysplasia, and (3) normal oral mucosa. Number, size, and localization of vessels labeled immunohistochemically for the antigen CD34 were assessed by image analysis using a software developed "ad hoc." All vascular sections and those localized immediately below the epithelium (sub-basal vessels) were separately evaluated in areas 30-μm deep. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression was labeled immunohistochemically and evaluated semiquantitatively against a standard. Leukoplakia and nontumoral borders adjacent to carcinomas exhibited an increase in VEGF expression and in subepithelial vascularization. This increase was significantly greater in leukoplakia with dysplastic changes than in leukoplakia without dysplasia. Conversely, no differences were observed between epithelia with and without dysplasia adjacent to carcinomas. Demonstration of expression of epithelial VEGF and sub-basal vascularization could be an additional aid for evaluation of the severity of potentially malignant lesions in oral mucosa routine biopsies.
    Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology 04/2011; 111(4):486-93. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We previously demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of different boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) protocols in an experimental model of oral cancer. BNCT is based on the selective accumulation of (10)B carriers in a tumor followed by neutron irradiation. Within the context of exploring the potential therapeutic efficacy of BNCT for the treatment of liver metastases, the aim of the present study was to perform boron biodistribution studies in an experimental model of liver metastases in rats. Different boron compounds and administration conditions were assayed to determine which administration protocols would potentially be therapeutically useful in in vivo BNCT studies at the RA-3 nuclear reactor. A total of 70 BDIX rats were inoculated in the liver with syngeneic colon cancer cells DHD/K12/TRb to induce the development of subcapsular tumor nodules. Fourteen days post-inoculation, the animals were used for biodistribution studies. We evaluated a total of 11 administration protocols for the boron compounds boronophenylalanine (BPA) and GB-10 (Na(2)(10)B(10)H(10)), alone or combined at different dose levels and employing different administration routes. Tumor, normal tissue, and blood samples were processed for boron measurement by atomic emission spectroscopy. Six protocols proved potentially useful for BNCT studies in terms of absolute boron concentration in tumor and preferential uptake of boron by tumor tissue. Boron concentration values in tumor and normal tissues in the liver metastases model show it would be feasible to reach therapeutic BNCT doses in tumor without exceeding radiotolerance in normal tissue at the thermal neutron facility at RA-3.
    Biophysik 03/2011; 50(1):199-207. · 1.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the present study the therapeutic effect and potential toxicity of the novel "Sequential" boron neutron capture therapy (Seq-BNCT) for the treatment of oral cancer was evaluated in the hamster cheek pouch model at the RA-3 Nuclear Reactor. Two groups of animals were treated with "Sequential" BNCT, i.e., BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) followed by BNCT mediated by sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) either 24 h (Seq-24h-BNCT) or 48 h (Seq-48h-BNCT) later. In an additional group of animals, BPA and GB-10 were administered concomitantly [(BPA + GB-10)-BNCT]. The single-application BNCT was to the same total physical tumor dose as the "Sequential" BNCT treatments. At 28 days post-treatment, Seq-24h-BNCT and Seq-48h-BNCT induced, respectively, overall tumor responses of 95 ± 2% and 91 ± 3%, with no statistically significant differences between protocols. Overall response for the single treatment with (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT was 75 ± 5%, significantly lower than for Seq-BNCT. Both Seq-BNCT protocols and (BPA + GB-10)-BNCT induced reversible mucositis in the dose-limiting precancerous tissue around treated tumors, reaching Grade 3/4 mucositis in 47 ± 12% and 60 ± 22% of the animals, respectively. No normal tissue toxicity was associated with tumor response for any of the protocols. "Sequential" BNCT enhanced tumor response without an increase in mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue.
    Radiation Research 02/2011; 175(4):463-72. · 2.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mast cell (MC) activation in the hamster cheek pouch cancerization model is associated with the increase in tumor cell proliferation, mediated in turn by tryptase, a protease released from mast cell granules after activation. Tryptase induces tumor cell proliferation through the activation of PAR-2 (protease activated receptor-2) on the plasma membrane of carcinoma cells. The therapeutic success of boron neutron capture therapy mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA-BNCT) in tumor control in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model has been previously reported by our laboratory. Early effects of BPA-BNCT on tumors of the hamster cheek pouch include a reduction in DNA-synthesis with the concomitant decrease in the proliferation of malignant cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the early histological changes in mast cells after BPA-BNCT in tumors and premalignant tissue of the hamster cheek pouch. Tumor-bearing pouches were treated with BPA-BNCT or beam only (neutron irradiation without prior administration of the boron compound) and sacrificed 1day after treatment. The samples were fixed in Carnoy fixative and stained with alcian blue-safranin to identify all the populations of mast cells. Total, active and inactive mast cells (MC) were counted in the connective tissue and the adventitious tissue underlying the pouch wall and at the base of the tumors in pouches treated with BPA-BNCT, in keeping with a previously described technique. BPA-BNCT induced a marked reduction in the total number of mast cells in the pouch (p<0.05). This reduction in the total number of mast cells was due to a reduction in mast cells at the base of the tumor (p<0.005) and it occurred at the expense of the active mast cells (p<0.05). A slight reduction that did not reach statistical significance also occurred in the amount of mast cells in the pouch wall (that corresponds to the premalignant tissue in tumor-bearing pouches), and in the adventitious tissue. In this case the reduction was seen in the inactive population. Both BPA-BNCT and beam only elicited a qualitative change in the secretion modality of the granule content. Although further studies are needed to evaluate the subcellular effect of BNCT on mast cell granule secretion, the reduction in cell proliferation induced by BPA-BNCT would be partially due to the decrease in total mast cells in the hamster check pouch.
    Oral Oncology 03/2010; 46(5):355-9. · 2.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Most research conducted by the dental scientific community is presented at the Annual Meetings of the different Divisions and Sections of IADR. This research acquires real value when the results are published in peer-reviewed journals. A useful indicator of the publication efficiency of research work is the rate of publication (PR), i.e., the ratio between the quantity of presentations and subsequent publications in peer-reviewed journals. The aim of this study was to analyze the PR of the presentations at the Sections and Divisions of the Latin American Region of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR). We considered the presentations at the Annual Meetings of Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Peru held in 2002 and 2003 and their corresponding publications indexed in PubMed from 2002 to 2009. For Venezuela, we analyzed the meetings held in 2002 and 2005, because they did not hold consecutive annual meetings. Presentation periods were selected based on previous data that report an interval of up to five years between presentation and publication. The number of presentations and the PR are related to the number of years that Sections and Divisions have existed. In Brazil and Argentina, PR (expressed as 1 publication: x presentations) is 1:3. The amount of research in Brazil is almost 8 times higher than in Argentina. Newer Sections and Divisions have produced fewer presentations, and the PR is also lower. We hope that this type of analysis will encourage the promotion of dental research at the different institutions and in the different vacancy areas of research, and facilitate exchange among researchers in the Region, enabling greater use to be made of their scientific activities.
    Acta odontológica latinoamericana: AOL 01/2010; 23(2):150-2.
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    ABSTRACT: Given that locoregional recurrences developing from a tissue with potentially malignant disorders (PMD) in oral mucosa are a frequent cause of therapeutic failure, and that tissue with PMD is dose-limiting, the aim of the present study was to develop a model of tissue with PMD to evaluate the long-term therapeutic/toxic effects of different therapeutic modalities. We evaluated 5 carcinogenesis protocols based on topical application of the carcinogen dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene in the hamster cheek pouch, twice a week for 4, 6, 7, and 8 weeks and the classical 3 times a week for 12 weeks. Long-term follow-up (8 months after protocol completion) was only possible with the 4- and 6-week carcinogenesis protocols. Tumour development increased progressively with time and aggressiveness of the carcinogenesis protocols. The time at which tumours developed in > or =90% of the animals was at protocol completion (T0) for the 12-week protocol, 1 month post-T0 for the 8-week protocol, 3 months post-T0 for the 7-week protocol and 4 months post-T0 for the 6-week protocol. <40% of the animals in the 4-week protocol developed tumours within the 8 months follow-up period. DNA synthesis rose as a function of time and protocol aggressiveness. The 6-week carcinogenesis protocol was selected for long-term studies of different therapeutic modalities in tissue with PMD because it permitted long-term follow-up and guaranteed tumour development in > or =90% of the animals.
    Archives of oral biology 11/2009; 55(1):46-51. · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to show that variations in nucleolar organizer regions (AgNOR) and the increase in subepithelial vascularization could reveal changes related to markers of field cancerization in alcoholic and smoking patients who have not yet expressed clinical or histological malignant lesions. Quantitative variations in epithelial AgNOR and in the vascularization of the underlying connective tissue were assessed by image analysis in histologically normal biopsy specimens from alcohol drinkers and smoking patients (DS). AgNORs were evidenced by silver staining and vessel walls were labeled by immunohistochemical demonstration of the CD34 antigen. Samples of oral mucosa of nonalcoholic, nonsmoking patients (NDS) obtained during surgical procedures served as controls. Eight parameters related to number, volume, and shape of nuclei and AgNORs, and 4 parameters related to number and diameter of vascular sections were evaluated. Differences between DS and NDS groups were statistically evaluated by means of ANOVA test and posterior Bonferroni comparisons. The morphometric analysis revealed more irregular-shaped AgNORs in the superficial and suprabasal layers of the oral mucosa of DS patients. The suprabasal layers also exhibited a significantly larger number of AgNORs. The normal oral mucosa of DS patients exhibited a greater vascular density, with predominance of small-caliber blood vessels underlying the basement membrane. The variations in AgNOR and epithelial vascularization would be practical biomarkers to evaluate changes underlying the augmented risk of cancerization in oral mucosa.
    Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology 09/2009; 108(5):747-53. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ex-situ BNCT for multifocal unresectable liver metastases employing whole or partial autograft techniques requires knowledge of boron concentrations in healthy liver and metastases following perfusion and immersion in Wisconsin solution (W), the procedure employed for organ preservation during ex-situ irradiation. Measurements of boron concentration in blood, liver and metastases following an intravenous infusion of BPA-F in five colorectal liver metastases patients scheduled for surgery were performed. Tissue samples were evaluated for boron content pre and post perfusion and immersion in W. Complementary histological studies were performed. The data showed a dose-dependent BPA uptake in liver, a boron concentration ratio liver/blood close to 1 and a wide spread in the metastases/liver concentration ratios in the range 0.8-3.6, partially attributable to histological variations between samples. Based on the boron concentrations and dose considerations (liver < or =15 Gy-Eq and tumor> or =40 Gy-Eq) at the RA-3 thermal neutron facility (mean flux of about (6+/-1) x 10(9) n cm(-2)s(-1)), ex-situ treatment of liver metastases at RA-3 would be feasible.
    Applied radiation and isotopes: including data, instrumentation and methods for use in agriculture, industry and medicine 04/2009; 67(7-8 Suppl):S76-9. · 1.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA) constructed a novel thermal neutron source for use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) applications at the RA-3 research reactor facility located in Buenos Aires. The aim of the present study was to perform a dosimetric characterization of the facility and undertake radiobiological studies of BNCT in an experimental model of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch. The free-field thermal flux was 7.1 x 10(9) n cm(-2)s(-1) and the fast neutron flux was 2.5 x 10(6) n cm(-2)s(-1), indicating a very well-thermalized neutron field with negligible fast neutron dose. For radiobiological studies it was necessary to shield the body of the hamster from the neutron flux while exposing the everted cheek pouch bearing the tumors. To that end we developed a lithium (enriched to 95% in (6)Li) carbonate enclosure. Groups of tumor-bearing hamsters were submitted to BPA-BNCT, GB-10-BNCT, (GB-10+BPA)-BNCT or beam only treatments. Normal (non-cancerized) hamsters were treated similarly to evaluate normal tissue radiotoxicity. The total physical dose delivered to tumor with the BNCT treatments ranged from 6 to 8.5 Gy. Tumor control at 30 days ranged from 73% to 85%, with no normal tissue radiotoxicity. Significant but reversible mucositis in precancerous tissue surrounding tumors was associated to BPA-BNCT. The therapeutic success of different BNCT protocols in treating experimental oral cancer at this novel facility was unequivocally demonstrated.
    Applied radiation and isotopes: including data, instrumentation and methods for use in agriculture, industry and medicine 04/2009; 67(7-8 Suppl):S309-12. · 1.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We previously demonstrated the efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA), GB-10 (Na(2)(10)B(10)H(10)) and (GB-10+BPA) to control tumors, with no normal tissue radiotoxicity, in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Herein we developed a novel experimental model of field-cancerization and precancerous lesions (globally termed herein precancerous tissue) in the hamster cheek pouch to explore the long-term potential inhibitory effect of the same BNCT protocols on the development of second primary tumors from precancerous tissue. Clinically, second primary tumor recurrences occur in field-cancerized tissue, causing therapeutic failure. We performed boron biodistribution studies followed by in vivo BNCT studies, with 8 months follow-up. All 3 BNCT protocols induced a statistically significant reduction in tumor development from precancerous tissue, reaching a maximum inhibition of 77-100%. The inhibitory effect of BPA-BNCT and (GB-10+BPA)-BNCT persisted at 51% at the end of follow-up (8 months), whereas for GB-10-BNCT it faded after 2 months. Likewise, beam-only elicited a significant but transient reduction in tumor development. No normal tissue radiotoxicity was observed. At 8 months post-treatment with BPA-BNCT or (GB-10+BPA)-BNCT, the precancerous pouches that did not develop tumors had regained the macroscopic and histological appearance of normal (non-cancerized) pouches. A potential new clinical application of BNCT would lie in its capacity to inhibit local regional recurrences.
    Applied radiation and isotopes: including data, instrumentation and methods for use in agriculture, industry and medicine 04/2009; 67(7-8 Suppl):S313-7. · 1.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The therapeutic success of different boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) protocols employing the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model has been previously reported by our laboratory. The aim of this study was to explore potential mechanisms of BNCT-induced damage to tumor in terms of potential inhibition in DNA synthesis and induction of apoptosis in the tumors that underwent partial remission following application of the different BNCT protocols in this model. We evaluated DNA synthesis employing incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine as an end-point. Apoptosis was evaluated by immunohistochemistry employing the deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick end-labeling technique and Bax and Bcl-2 labeling. These studies were performed in tumors that underwent partial remission 1-30 days post-BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA), GB-10 (Na(2)(10)B(10)H(10)) or (BPA + GB-10). BNCT exerted a marked inhibitory effect on DNA synthesis in tumors for all the protocols under study. The inhibitory effect of BPA-BNCT occurred as soon as 1 day post-treatment (P < 0.001). Conversely, the effect of GB-10-BNCT became apparent 7-14 days after therapy (P < 0.001) and was sustained until killed at 30 days post-treatment (P < 0.001). (GB-10 + BPA)-BNCT exerted a rapid and persistent effect, conceivably because of the combined effect of BNCT mediated by both boron compounds. The apoptosis studies did not show differences between the pre-treatment group and any of the BNCT groups. One of the mechanisms involved in BNCT-induced tumor control in our model would be an inhibitory effect on DNA synthesis. Apoptosis does not seem to have a significant role in BNCT-induced tumor control in our model.
    Journal of Oral Pathology and Medicine 12/2008; 38(5):448-54. · 2.06 Impact Factor
  • V H Tomasi, M A Pérez, M E Itoiz
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    ABSTRACT: The cheek pouch is an anatomical peculiarity of hamsters, widely used as an experimental model for oral cancer, and characterization of its normal cell populations and the changes they undergo in pathological conditions is of great interest. Our studies of epithelium-connective tissue interactions have revealed that hamster eosinophils are not easily recognizable because they are small and exhibit a larger nucleus:cytoplasm ratio than those in human and other animal tissues. Luna's technique is the most popular specific staining technique for eosinophils. Owing to the morphology of hamster eosinophils, however, it was necessary to modify Luna's technique to stain these cells selectively against a more contrasting background that would enable their identification and quantitation in the hamster cheek pouch. The modification involved staining the sections with a solution of 0.5% Biebrich scarlet in lithium carbonate followed by counterstaining with 1% metanil yellow in water. The eosinophils were stained selectively red against a yellow background. Our technique avoided nuclear staining and enhanced observation of selectively stained granules in a scarce cytoplasm with a contrasting background, which permits fast, reproducible studies and automated image analysis.
    Biotechnic & Histochemistry 10/2008; 83(3):147-51. · 0.67 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

642 Citations
151.93 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1966–2011
    • University of Buenos Aires
      • • Faculty of Dentistry
      • • Institute of Oncology Ángel H. Roffo
      • • Department of Pathology
      • • Department of Microbiology
      Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires F.D., Argentina
  • 2009
    • National University of Cordoba, Argentina
      Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina
  • 1976–2009
    • Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica
      • Departamento de Radiobiología
      Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires F.D., Argentina
  • 2007
    • National University of Central Buenos Aires
      Тандиль, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • 1982–2000
    • Academia Nacional de Medicina, Buenos Aires
      Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires F.D., Argentina
  • 1996
    • University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
      • Science Park - Research Division
      Houston, TX, United States