Ronny Bruffaerts

University of Ulster, Aontroim, N Ireland, United Kingdom

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Publications (151)508.81 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background Previous research suggests that many people receiving mental health treatment do not meet criteria for a mental disorder but are rather 'the worried well'. Aims To examine the association of past-year mental health treatment with DSM-IV disorders. Method The World Health Organization's World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys interviewed community samples of adults in 23 countries (n = 62 305) about DSM-IV disorders and treatment in the past 12 months for problems with emotions, alcohol or drugs. Results Roughly half (52%) of people who received treatment met criteria for a past-year DSM-IV disorder, an additional 18% for a lifetime disorder and an additional 13% for other indicators of need (multiple subthreshold disorders, recent stressors or suicidal behaviours). Dose-response associations were found between number of indicators of need and treatment. Conclusions The vast majority of treatment in the WMH countries goes to patients with mental disorders or other problems expected to benefit from treatment.
    The British journal of psychiatry: the journal of mental science 11/2014; · 6.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although there is a significant association between pre-existing depression and later onset of chronic headache, the extent to which other pre-existing mental disorders are associated with subsequent onset of headache in the general population is not known. Also unknown is the extent to which these associations vary by gender or by life course. We report global data from the WHO’s World Mental Health surveys (N=52,095), in which, by means of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview-3.0 (CIDI-3.0), 16 DSM-IV mental disorders were retrospectively assessed in terms of lifetime prevalence and age-of-onset. Frequent or severe headaches were assessed using self-reports. After adjustment for covariates, survival models showed a moderate but consistent association between pre-existing mood (ORs 1.3-1.4), anxiety (ORs 1.2-1.7), and impulse-control disorders (ORs 1.7-1.9) and the subsequent onset of headache. We also found a dose-response relationship between the number of pre-existing mental disorders and subsequent headache onset (OR ranging between 1.9 for 1 up to 3.4 for 5+ pre-existing mental disorders). Our findings suggest a consistent and pervasive relationship between a wide range of pre-existing mental disorders and the subsequent onset of headaches. This highlights the importance of assessing a broad range of mental disorders, not just depression, as specific risk factors for the subsequent onset of frequent or severe headaches. Perspective This study shows that there is a temporal association between a broad range of pre-existing mental disorders and the subsequent onset of severe or frequent headaches in general population sample across the world.
    The journal of pain: official journal of the American Pain Society 10/2014; · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Associations between asthma and anxiety and mood disorders are well established, but little is known about their temporal sequence. We examined associations between a wide range of DSM-IV mental disorders with adult onset of asthma and whether observed associations remain after mental comorbidity adjustments.
    Journal of Psychiatric Research 09/2014; · 4.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT Background: Death wishes are not uncommon in older persons, and to date, several risk factors have been identified. The presence of these risk factors is insufficient to fully understand why some older people, who are exposed to them, develop a wish to die and why others do not. The purpose of the study was to explore whether Purpose in Life as well as other life attitudes are associated with a death wish in older males and females. Methods: The sample comprised 113 older inpatients (from a psychiatric and somatic ward) with a mean age of 74 years. Psychiatric diagnoses were assessed by the SCID-II. Logistic regression analyses estimated the unique contribution of (the interaction between) life attitudes and gender to the wish to die, controlling for sociodemographic variables, depressive disorder, and somatic symptoms. Results: We observed a statistically significant relationship between life attitudes and the wish to die. Purpose in Life and the Purpose in Life*Gender interaction explained significant additional variance in the prediction of the wish to die. Purposelessness in life might therefore be an important correlate of a wish to die, especially in older men, independently from sociodemographic and clinical features. Conclusions: In assessing a wish to die in older adults, life attitudes need to be taken into account, besides the presence of a depressive disorder and/or somatic health. More specifically, finding or maintaining a purpose in later life might be an important feature in the prevention of the wish to die, especially in male persons.
    International psychogeriatrics / IPA. 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The associations between mental disorders and cancer remain unclear. It is also unknown whether any associations vary according to life stage or gender. This paper examines these research questions using data from the World Mental Health Survey Initiative. The World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview retrospectively assessed the lifetime prevalence of 16 DSM-IV mental disorders in face-to-face household population surveys in nineteen countries (n=52,095). Cancer was indicated by self-report of diagnosis. Smoking was assessed in questions about current and past tobacco use. Survival analyses estimated associations between first onset of mental disorders and subsequently reported cancer. After adjustment for comorbidity, panic disorder, specific phobia and alcohol abuse were associated with a subsequently self-reported diagnosis of cancer. There was an association between number of mental disorders and the likelihood of reporting a cancer diagnosis following the onset of the mental disorder. This suggests that the associations between mental disorders and cancer risk may be generalised, rather than specific to a particular disorder. Depression is more strongly associated with self-reported cancers diagnosed early in life and in women. PTSD is also associated with cancers diagnosed early in life. This study reports the magnitude of the associations between mental disorders and a self-reported diagnosis of cancer and provides information about the relevance of comorbidity, gender and the impact at different stages of life. The findings point to a link between the two conditions and lend support to arguments for early identification and treatment of mental disorders.
    Journal of psychosomatic research 03/2014; 76(3):207-12. · 2.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The study explores the reflections of older adults on the process preceding their suicide attempt. Data were gathered using in-depth interviews with eight older inpatients who had attempted suicide. Grounded theory methodology was used for data analysis. They described their life and the self as disrupted after experiencing a loss, loneliness, loss of control, and unwillingness to continue living the current life. The findings suggest that the concurrence of these constructs precedes a suicide attempt in later life.
    Death Studies 02/2014; · 0.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: No studies have evaluated whether the frequently observed associations between depression and diabetes could reflect the presence of comorbid psychiatric conditions and their associations with diabetes. We therefore examined the associations between a wide range of pre-existing Diagnostic Statistical Manual, 4th edition (DSM-IV) mental disorders with self-reported diagnosis of diabetes. We performed a series of cross-sectional face-to-face household surveys of community-dwelling adults (n = 52,095) in 19 countries. The World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview retrospectively assessed lifetime prevalence and age at onset of 16 DSM-IV mental disorders. Diabetes was indicated by self-report of physician's diagnosis together with its timing. We analysed the associations between all mental disorders and diabetes, without and with comorbidity adjustment. We identified 2,580 cases of adult-onset diabetes mellitus (21 years +). Although all 16 DSM-IV disorders were associated with diabetes diagnosis in bivariate models, only depression (OR 1.3; 95% CI 1.1, 1.5), intermittent explosive disorder (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.1, 2.1), binge eating disorder (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.7, 4.0) and bulimia nervosa (OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.3, 3.4) remained after comorbidity adjustment. Depression and impulse control disorders (eating disorders in particular) were significantly associated with diabetes diagnosis after comorbidity adjustment. These findings support the focus on depression as having a role in diabetes onset, but suggest that this focus may be extended towards impulse control disorders. Acknowledging the comorbidity of mental disorders is important in determining the associations between mental disorders and subsequent diabetes.
    Diabetologia 02/2014; · 6.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In an effort to support mental health policy planning efforts in conjunction with the reconstruction of Iraq, a nationally representative face-to-face household survey was carried out that assessed the prevalence and correlates of common mental disorders in the Iraqi population. A total of 4,332 adult (ages 18+) respondents were interviewed (95.2% response rate). The current report presents data on the role impairments (number of days out-of-role in the past 30 days) associated with the nine mental disorders assessed in the survey in comparison to the impairments associated with ten chronic physical disorders also assessed in the survey. These disorders were all assessed with the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Days out-of-role was assessed with the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule. Both individual-level and societal-level effects of the disorders were estimated. Strongest individual-level predictors were bipolar and drug abuse disorders (176-95 days per year), with mental disorders making up five of the seven strongest predictors. The strongest population-level predictors were headache/migraine and arthritis (22-12% population proportions). Overall population proportions were 57% of days out-of-role due to the chronic physical disorders considered here and 18% for the mental disorders. Despite commonly-occurring mental disorders accounting for more individual-level days out-of-role than the physical disorders, mental disorders are much less likely to receive treatment in Iraq (e.g., due to stigma). These results highlight the need for culturally tailored mental health prevention and treatment programs in Iraq.
    Journal of Psychiatric Research 01/2014; · 4.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the last few decades, there has been a remarkable increase in the number of children and adolescents presenting with psychiatric complaints to the emergency department in the USA. In Europe, however, less is known about the paediatric psychiatric emergency population. This study provides a clinical and demographic profile of this population and its service use in a European context. From 2003 to 2008, we registered 989 paediatric psychiatric patients consulting the psychiatric emergency services (PES) of a large university hospital in Belgium. During this period the number of patients increased more than three-fold. Patients were predominantly female (57.3%) and adolescent (83.3%) and mostly referred for hostility and violence towards others (18.5%) and suicidal ideation (17.8%). For about 1/4 of the patients, PES was the first ever mental health treatment contact. PES could serve as a place for early detection and intervention and as an entry point to mental health services.
    European Journal of Emergency Medicine 11/2013; · 0.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relative importance of common physical and mental disorders with regard to the number of days out-of-role (DOR; number of days for which a person is completely unable to work or carry out normal activities because of health problems) in a population-based sample of adults in the Sã o Paulo Metropolitan Area, Brazil. METHODS: The Sã o Paulo Megacity Mental Health Survey was administered during face-to-face interviews with 2,942 adult household residents. The presence of 8 chronic physical disorders and 3 classes of mental disorders (mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders) was assessed for the previous year along with the number of days in the previous month for which each respondent was completely unable to work or carry out normal daily activities due to health problems. Using multiple regression analysis, we examined the associations of the disorders and their comorbidities with the number of days out-of-role while controlling for socio-demographic variables. Both individual-level and population-level associations were assessed. RESULTS: A total of 13.1% of the respondents reported 1 or more days out-of-role in the previous month, with an annual median of 41.4 days out-of-role. The disorders considered in this study accounted for 71.7% of all DOR; the disorders that caused the greatest number of DOR at the individual-level were digestive (22.6), mood (19.9), substance use (15.0), chronic pain (16.5), and anxiety (14.0) disorders. The disorders associated with the highest population-attributable DOR were chronic pain (35.2%), mood (16.5%), and anxiety (15.0%) disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Because pain, anxiety, and mood disorders have high effects at both the individual and societal levels, targeted interventions to reduce the impairments associated with these disorders have the highest potential to reduce the societal burdens of chronic illness in the Sã o Paulo Metropolitan Area.
    Clinics 11/2013; 68(11):1392-1399.
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the relative importance of common physical and mental disorders with regard to the number of days out-of-role (DOR; number of days for which a person is completely unable to work or carry out normal activities because of health problems) in a population-based sample of adults in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area, Brazil. The São Paulo Megacity Mental Health Survey was administered during face-to-face interviews with 2,942 adult household residents. The presence of 8 chronic physical disorders and 3 classes of mental disorders (mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders) was assessed for the previous year along with the number of days in the previous month for which each respondent was completely unable to work or carry out normal daily activities due to health problems. Using multiple regression analysis, we examined the associations of the disorders and their comorbidities with the number of days out-of-role while controlling for socio-demographic variables. Both individual-level and population-level associations were assessed. A total of 13.1% of the respondents reported 1 or more days out-of-role in the previous month, with an annual median of 41.4 days out-of-role. The disorders considered in this study accounted for 71.7% of all DOR; the disorders that caused the greatest number of DOR at the individual-level were digestive (22.6), mood (19.9), substance use (15.0), chronic pain (16.5), and anxiety (14.0) disorders. The disorders associated with the highest population-attributable DOR were chronic pain (35.2%), mood (16.5%), and anxiety (15.0%) disorders. Because pain, anxiety, and mood disorders have high effects at both the individual and societal levels, targeted interventions to reduce the impairments associated with these disorders have the highest potential to reduce the societal burdens of chronic illness in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area.
    Clinics (São Paulo, Brazil) 11/2013; 68(11):1392-1399. · 1.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a heterogeneous disease. More homogeneous psycho(patho)logical dimensions would facilitate MDD research as well as clinical practice. The first aim of this study was to find potential dimensions within a broad psychopathological assessment in depressed patients. Second, we aimed at examining how these dimensions predicted course in MDD. Ten psychopathological variables were assessed in 75 MDD inpatients. Factor and regression analyses assessed putative relations between psychopathological factors and depression severity and outcome after 8 weeks of treatment. A 3-factor model (eigenvalue: 54.4%) was found, representing a psychomotor change, anhedonia and negative affect factor. Anhedonia and negative affect predicted depression severity (R(2)=0.37, F=20.86, p<0.0001). Anhedonia predicted non-response (OR 6.00, CI 1.46-24.59) and both negative affect (OR 5.69, CI 1.19-27.20) and anhedonia predicted non-remission (OR 9.28, CI 1.85-46.51). The sample size of the study was relatively modest, limiting the number of variables included in the analysis. Results confirm that psychomotor change, anhedonia and negative affect are key MDD dimensions, two of which are related to treatment outcome.
    Journal of Affective Disorders 10/2013; · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background. Cross-national population data from the WHO World Mental Health surveys are used to compare role attainments and role impairments associated with binge-eating disorder (BED) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Methods. Community surveys assessed 23��000 adults across 12 countries for BED, BN and ten other DSM-IV mental disorders using the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Age-of-onset was assessed retrospectively. Ten physical disorders were assessed using standard conditions checklists. Analyses examined reciprocal time-lagged associations of eating disorders (EDs) with education, associations of early-onset (i.e., prior to completing education) EDs with subsequent adult role attainments and cross-sectional associations of current EDs with days of role impairment. Results. BED and BN predicted significantly increased education (females). Student status predicted increased risk of subsequent BED and BN (females). Early-onset BED predicted reduced odds of current (at time of interview) marriage (females) and reduced odds of current employment (males). Early-onset BN predicted increased odds of current work disability (females and males). Current BED and BN were both associated with significantly increased days of role impairment (females and males). Significant BED and BN effects on adult role attainments and impairments were explained by controls for comorbid disorders. Conclusions. Effects of BED on role attainments and impairments are comparable with those of BN. The most plausible interpretation of the fact that these associations are explained by comorbid disorders is that causal effects of EDs are mediated through secondary disorders. Controlled treatment effectiveness studies are needed to trace out long-term effects of BED���BN on secondary disorders.
    Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences 09/2013; · 3.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We examined the extent to which disability mediates the observed associations of common mental and physical conditions with perceived health. WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys carried out in 22 countries worldwide (n = 51,344 respondents, 72.0% response rate). We assessed nine common mental conditions with the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), and ten chronic physical with a checklist. A visual analog scale (VAS) score (0, worst to 100, best) measured perceived health in the previous 30 days. Disability was assessed using a modified WHO Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS), including: cognition, mobility, self-care, getting along, role functioning (life activities), family burden, stigma, and discrimination. Path analysis was used to estimate total effects of conditions on perceived health VAS and their separate direct and indirect (through the WHODAS dimensions) effects. Twelve-month prevalence was 14.4% for any mental and 51.4% for any physical condition. 31.7% of respondents reported difficulties in role functioning, 11.4% in mobility, 8.3% in stigma, 8.1% in family burden and 6.9% in cognition. Other difficulties were much less common. Mean VAS score was 81.0 (SD = 0.1). Decrements in VAS scores were highest for neurological conditions (9.8), depression (8.2) and bipolar disorder (8.1). Across conditions, 36.8% (IQR: 31.2-51.5%) of the total decrement in perceived health associated with the condition were mediated by WHODAS disabilities (significant for 17 of 19 conditions). Role functioning was the dominant mediator for both mental and physical conditions. Stigma and family burden were also important mediators for mental conditions, and mobility for physical conditions. More than a third of the decrement in perceived health associated with common conditions is mediated by disability. Although the decrement is similar for physical and mental conditions, the pattern of mediation is different. Research is needed on the benefits for perceived health of targeted interventions aimed at particular disability dimensions.
    PLoS ONE 09/2013; 8(6):e65858. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to study the comorbidity of common mental disorders (CMDs) and cancer, and the mental health treatment gap among community residents with active cancer, cancer survivors and cancer-free respondents in 13 high-income and 11 low-middle-income countries. Data were derived from the World Mental Health Surveys (N = 66,387; n = 357 active cancer, n = 1373 cancer survivors, n = 64,657 cancer-free respondents). The World Health Organization/Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used in all surveys to estimate CMDs prevalence rates. Respondents were also asked about mental health service utilization in the preceding 12 months. Cancer status was ascertained by self-report of physician's diagnosis. Twelve-month prevalence rates of CMDs were higher among active cancer (18.4%, SE = 2.1) than cancer-free respondents (13.3%, SE = 0.2) adjusted for sociodemographic confounders and other lifetime chronic conditions (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.44, 95% CI 1.05-1.97). CMD rates among cancer survivors (14.6%, SE = 0.9) compared with cancer-free respondents did not differ significantly (AOR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.82-1.11). Similar patterns characterized high-income and low-middle-income countries. Of respondents with active cancer who had CMD in the preceding 12 months, 59% sought services for mental health problems (SE = 5.3). The pattern of service utilization among people with CMDs by cancer status (highest among persons with active cancer, lower among survivors and lowest among cancer-free respondents) was similar in high-income (64.0%, SE = 6.0; 41.2%, SE = 3.0; 35.6%, SE = 0.6) and low-middle-income countries (46.4%, SE = 11.0; 22.5%, SE = 9.1; 17.4%, SE = 0.7). Community respondents with active cancer have higher CMD rates and high treatment gap. Comprehensive cancer care should consider both factors. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Psycho-Oncology 08/2013; · 3.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prior studies on the depression-heart disease association have not usually used diagnostic measures of depression, or taken other mental disorders into consideration. As a result, it is not clear whether the association between depression and heart disease onset reflects a specific association, or the comorbidity between depression and other mental disorders. Additionally, the relative magnitude of associations of a range of mental disorders with heart disease onset is unknown. Face-to-face household surveys were conducted in 19 countries (n=52,095; person years=2,141,194). The Composite International Diagnostic Interview retrospectively assessed lifetime prevalence and age at onset of 16 DSM-IV mental disorders. Heart disease was indicated by self-report of physician's diagnosis, or self-report of heart attack, together with their timing (year). Survival analyses estimated associations between first onset of mental disorders and subsequent heart disease onset. After comorbidity adjustment, depression, panic disorder, specific phobia, post-traumatic stress disorder and alcohol use disorders were associated with heart disease onset (ORs 1.3-1.6). Increasing number of mental disorders was associated with heart disease in a dose-response fashion. Mood disorders and alcohol abuse were more strongly associated with earlier onset than later onset heart disease. Associations did not vary by gender. Depression, anxiety and alcohol use disorders were significantly associated with heart disease onset; depression was the weakest predictor. If confirmed in future prospective studies, the breadth of psychopathology's links with heart disease onset has substantial clinical and public health implications.
    International journal of cardiology 08/2013; · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine barriers to initiation and continuation of mental health treatment among individuals with common mental disorders. Method Data were from the World Health Organization (WHO) World Mental Health (WMH) surveys. Representative household samples were interviewed face to face in 24 countries. Reasons to initiate and continue treatment were examined in a subsample (n = 636 78) and analyzed at different levels of clinical severity. Among those with a DSM-IV disorder in the past 12 months, low perceived need was the most common reason for not initiating treatment and more common among moderate and mild than severe cases. Women and younger people with disorders were more likely to recognize a need for treatment. A desire to handle the problem on one's own was the most common barrier among respondents with a disorder who perceived a need for treatment (63.8%). Attitudinal barriers were much more important than structural barriers to both initiating and continuing treatment. However, attitudinal barriers dominated for mild-moderate cases and structural barriers for severe cases. Perceived ineffectiveness of treatment was the most commonly reported reason for treatment drop-out (39.3%), followed by negative experiences with treatment providers (26.9% of respondents with severe disorders). Low perceived need and attitudinal barriers are the major barriers to seeking and staying in treatment among individuals with common mental disorders worldwide. Apart from targeting structural barriers, mainly in countries with poor resources, increasing population mental health literacy is an important endeavor worldwide.
    Psychological Medicine 08/2013; · 5.59 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4k Citations
508.81 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • University of Ulster
      • Bamford Centre for Mental Health and Wellbeing
      Aontroim, N Ireland, United Kingdom
  • 2011–2014
    • Universitair Psychiatrisch Centrum KU Leuven
      Cortenberg, Flanders, Belgium
  • 2006–2014
    • University of Leuven
      • • Division of Psychiatry
      • • Department of Neurosciences
      Louvain, Flanders, Belgium
  • 2013
    • Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya
      Hertsliyah, Tel Aviv, Israel
    • University of São Paulo
      • Institute of Psychiatry
      São Paulo, Estado de Sao Paulo, Brazil
    • King's College London
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
    • University Pompeu Fabra
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2007–2013
    • University of Otago
      • Department of Psychological Medicine (Dunedin)
      Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand
  • 2005–2013
    • Universitair Ziekenhuis Leuven
      • Department of Psychiatry
      Louvain, Flanders, Belgium
  • 2002–2013
    • IMIM Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2012
    • Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu
      Sant Boi de Llobregat, Catalonia, Spain
    • University of Toronto
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    • Boston Children's Hospital
      • Division of General Pediatrics
      Boston, MA, United States
    • Michigan State University
      • College of Human Medicine
      East Lansing, MI, United States
    • Harvard Medical School
      • Department of Health Care Policy
      Boston, MA, United States
    • The University of Tokyo
      • Department of Public Health
      Tokyo, Tokyo-to, Japan
  • 2009–2011
    • Université René Descartes - Paris 5
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • The Chinese University of Hong Kong
      • Department of Psychiatry
      Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    • University of Maryland, Baltimore
      • Department of Family and Community Health (FCH)
      Baltimore, MD, United States
  • 2010
    • Groote Schuur Hospital
      Kaapstad, Western Cape, South Africa
    • Ministry of Health (Israel)
      Yerushalayim, Jerusalem District, Israel
    • Instituto Nacional de Psiquiatría
      Ciudad de México, The Federal District, Mexico
    • University of Hamburg
      • Department of Medical Sociology and Health Economics
      Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
    • The Netherlands Institute for Addiction Healthcare
      Arnheim, Gelderland, Netherlands
    • Autonomous University of Barcelona
      Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2008–2010
    • University of New South Wales
      Kensington, New South Wales, Australia
    • University of Groningen
      • Department of Psychiatry
      Groningen, Province of Groningen, Netherlands