Nathalie Arnault

Université Paris 13 Nord, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (34)96.51 Total impact

  • Cahiers de Nutrition et de Diététique 12/2011; 46:S64.
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    ABSTRACT: Epidemiologic studies have suggested an association between polyphenol intake and health. These studies have been limited to ≤40 flavonoid and lignan aglycones. We estimated intakes of all known individual polyphenols in the French cohort SUpplémentation en VItamines et Minéraux AntioXydants (SU.VI.MAX) by using the recently developed database Phenol-Explorer, which contains content values for 502 polyphenols in 452 foods. A total of 4942 men and women, who were aged 45-60 y and who had completed at least six 24-h dietary records, participated in this study. Foods documented in 24-h dietary records and the Phenol-Explorer database were matched, and intakes of all individual polyphenols were calculated. A total of 337 polyphenols were consumed by SU.VI.MAX subjects, including 258 polyphenols consumed by at least one-half of the population and 98 polyphenols consumed in an amount >1 mg/d. Mean total polyphenol intake was estimated at 1193 ± 510 mg/d (or 820 ± 335 mg/d when expressed as aglycone equivalents), with hydroxycinnamic acid esters and proanthocyanidins being the most largely consumed polyphenols. These values may have been underestimated because of insufficient data or lack of accurate data on the content in foods for proanthocyanidins and thearubigins. Nonalcoholic beverages and fruit were the most important contributors to polyphenol intakes. The current study provides intake data for all individual polyphenols known to be present in the diet of a cohort. This information will be essential to characterize the health effects of individual phenolic compounds that differ widely in their bioavailability and physiologic properties. The SU.VI.MAX study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00272428.
    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 06/2011; 93(6):1220-8. · 6.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the potential association between growth during the first 2 years of life and the risk of overweight in childhood. Overweight status of 1 582 French children aged 7-9 years in 2000 was estimated, using measured weight and height data collected retrospectively. Overweight was estimated using measured weight and height. Linear mixed models identified six growth parameters associated with later overweight: weight, length and body mass index (BMI) attained at 1 year, average monthly weight and length gain, and average variation in monthly weight gain. In the combined logistic regression model, the risk of overweight in boys at 7-9 years was associated with average monthly weight gain (odds ratio [OR] for 100 g=2.06, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22, 3.48) and BMI at 1 year (OR for 1 kg/m(2)=1.83, CI: 1.33, 2.51), while in girls, it was associated with weight at 1 year (OR for 1 kg=2.24, CI: 1.37, 3.66), BMI at 1 year (OR for 1 kg/m(2)=1.58, CI: 1.05, 2.39) and average variation in monthly weight gain (OR for 1 g=1.13, CI: 1.04, 1.22). This study showed the simultaneous association of large infant size at 1 year and early rapid infant growth along with overweight at 7-9 years, as well as involvement of early growth velocity variations. Early infancy, a phase of very rapid growth, constitutes a critical period for the onset of overweight.
    International journal of pediatric obesity: IJPO: an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity 10/2010; 6(2-2):e162-9. · 2.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A low folate intake or a low folate status have been found to be associated with a higher frequency of depression in populations, but the existence and the direction of a causal link between folate intake or status and depression is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to seek the relation between the habitual folate intake in middle-aged men and women and the occurrence of depressive episodes. In a subsample of 1864 subjects (809 men and 1055 women) from the French SU.VI.MAX cohort, dietary habits have been measured at the beginning of the follow-up (six 24 h records) and declarations of antidepressant prescription, taken as markers of depressive episodes, have been recorded during the 8-year follow-up. No significant association was observed between folate intake and the risk of any depressive episode or of a single depressive episode during the follow-up, in both men and women. In contrast, the risk of experiencing recurrent depressive episodes (two or more) during the follow-up was strongly reduced in men with high folate intake (OR 0.25 (95 % CI 0.06, 0.98) for the highest tertile v. the lowest, P for trend 0.046). This association was not observed in women. These results suggest that a low folate intake may increase the risk of recurrent depression in men.
    The British journal of nutrition 08/2008; 100(1):183-7. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    Proceedings of The Nutrition Society 06/2008; 67(OCE):E177. · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to seek whether habitual fish and seafood or n-3 long-chain PUFA intake could influence the occurrence of depressive episodes. In a subsample from the French SU.VI.MAX cohort, dietary habits have been assessed during the first 2 years of the follow-up (six 24-h records) and declarations of antidepressant prescription, taken as markers of depressive episodes, have been recorded during the 8-year follow-up. Subjects consuming fatty fish or with an intake of long-chain n-3 PUFA higher than 0.10% of energy intake had a significantly lesser risk of any depressive episode and of recurrent depressive episodes, but not of single depressive episode. These associations were stronger in men and in non-smokers. In contrast, smokers eating fatty fish had an increased risk of recurrent depression. These results suggest that a usual intake of fatty fish or long-chain n-3 PUFA may decrease the risk of recurrent depression in non-smokers.
    Prostaglandins Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids 04/2008; 78(3):171-82. · 2.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A number of potential health effects have lately been accorded to tea consumption. It is, however, not clear whether an increase in tea consumption increases the risk of iron depletion in a normal apparently healthy adult population. We have therefore evaluated this. Cross-sectional study. A total of 954 men (aged 52-68 years) and 1639 women (aged 42-68 years), who were participants of SU.VI.MAX Study, completed a detailed questionnaire on tea consumption. To determine the iron status of the participants, a venous blood sample was drawn and serum-ferritin was measured. Iron depletion was defined as a serum ferritin concentration <16 microg/l. Three 1-day food records were used to estimate the intake of other dietary enhancing or inhibiting factors of iron absorption, which were included in the logistic regression models. The mean serum-ferritin concentration was not related to black, green and herbal tea consumption in men, pre- or postmenopausal women. Also the risk of iron depletion was in the multivariate model not related to any kind of tea drinking or to the strength of tea, the infusion time or the time of tea drinking. The data suggest that normal apparently healthy adults are not at risk of iron depletion owing to any kind of tea drinking.
    European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 11/2007; 61(10):1174-9. · 2.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To measure the correlations between habitual intakes of individual n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and their percentages in total plasma fatty acids in a population of adult men and women. Two hundred and seventy-six men and 257 women aged 45-60 (men) or 35-60 (women) at baseline, volunteers of the French SU.VI.MAX cohort. Fifteen 24-h record questionnaires were used to estimate the habitual intake of energy, total fat and linoleic, alpha-linolenic acid, arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic (EPA), n-3 docosapentaenoic (DPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids. Fatty acid composition of fasting plasma total lipids has been determined at baseline. Dietary intakes of linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, EPA and DHA were weakly but significantly correlated (0.16<r<0.28, P<0.01) with their respective percentages in plasma total fatty acids in both men and women. No correlation was observed between the plasma levels of alpha-linolenic acid and its dietary intake, and between the plasma levels of arachidonic acid and long-chain n-3 PUFA and the intakes of their 18-carbon precursors, linoleic and alpha-linolenic acid, respectively. The percentages of linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, EPA and DHA in plasma total fatty acids, but not that of alpha-linolenic acid, are acceptable markers of their habitual levels of intake. The plasma levels of long-chain n-6 and n-3 PUFA are not influenced by the intake levels of their precursors, linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids.
    European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 08/2007; 62(10):1155-61. · 2.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim was to estimate the association between dairy products (total and their subgroups), calcium intake and the risk of breast cancer. As few studies have considered menopausal status, we also investigated stratified analyses. This analysis included 3,627 women from the French SU.VI.MAX study, among whom 92 developed breast cancer during the follow-up period. Food consumption was assessed based on five 24-hour records completed during the previous 18 months to follow-up. Calcium intake was calculated using an ad-hoc food composition database. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risk (RR), comparing 4th quartile vs. 1st quartile, and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). A lower risk of breast cancer was observed with high total dairy product consumption in the whole population (RR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.29-1.03, p(trend) = 0.03) and among premenopausal women with a RR of 0.35 (95% CI = 0.12-0.95, p(trend) = 0.01). None of these associations remained after control for calcium intake. Increasing calcium intake was inversely associated with breast cancer risk considering the whole population (RR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.27-0.91, p(trend) = 0.04) and among the subgroup of premenopausal women (RR = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.10-0.71, p(trend) = 0.01) respectively. Our data support the hypothesis that dairy products, through calcium content or a correlated component, might have a negative association with the risk of breast cancer, particularly among premenopausal women.
    Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism 02/2007; 51(2):139-45. · 1.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Significant differences in serum selenium concentration according to contraceptive treatment and age have been evidenced in women of the SU.VI.M.AX cohort. This study aimed at verifying the physiopathological hypothesis that the observed increase in serum selenium concentration could be related to serum lipid increase and/or bleeding decrease. Women were divided into six groups: menopausal with or without hormonal replacement therapy; non-menopausal using contraceptive pills; intrauterine device; other contraceptive treatment or no contraceptive treatment. Adjusted linear regression indicated positive associations between selenium and apolipoprotein A1 (r(2) from 0.038 to 0.074, p<0.07 depending on groups) or ferritin in serum (r(2) from 0.032 to 0.075, p<0.07 depending on groups). These relationships could explain the differences observed according to hormonal treatment and age in the SU.VI.MAX study.
    Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology 01/2007; 21 Suppl 1:66-9. · 1.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to create a French database on the polyphenol content of fruit and vegetables as uncooked fruits and vegetables and then to evaluate polyphenol intake through fruit and vegetable consumption in France. To achieve this, we used the Folin-Ciocalteu method adapted to fruit and vegetable polyphenol quantitation (1). Vegetables with the highest polyphenol concentration were artichokes, parsley, and brussels sprouts [>250 mg of gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/100 g fresh edible portion (FEP)]; fruits with the highest concentrations were strawberries, lychees, and grapes (>180 mg of GAE/100 g FEP). Conversely, melons (Cantaloupe cv.) and avocados had the lowest polyphenol concentration for fruits and vegetables, respectively. Based on fruit consumption data, apples and strawberries are the main sources of polyphenols in the French diet, whereas potatoes, lettuces, and onions are the most important vegetable sources. Total polyphenol intake from fruit is about 3 times higher than from vegetables, due to the lower polyphenol concentration in vegetables. The calculation of polyphenol intake, based on both assessment methods used [(Société d'Etudes de la Communication, Distribution et Publicité (SECODIP) and Supplémentation en Vitamines et Minéraux Antioxydants (SUVIMAX)], showed that apples and potatoes provide approximatively half of the total polyphenol intake from fruit and vegetables in the French diet.
    Journal of Nutrition 10/2006; 136(9):2368-73. · 4.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of the study is to evaluate the relation between antioxidant-rich beverages and the incidence of breast cancer. This prospective study consisted of 4396 women without a history of cancer who were participants in the French Supplémentation en Vitamines et Minéraux Antioxydants Study. Beverage consumption was estimated by using three nonconsecutive 24-hour recalls. Incident cancer cases were identified through clinical examinations performed every other year, including, e.g., a screening mammogram, and through a monthly health questionnaire. During the median 6.6 years of follow-up, 95 breast cancers were diagnosed. In a multivariate model, an inverse association between herbal tea consumption and risk for breast cancer was observed (compared with nondrinkers, drinking 1 to 149 mL/d; relative risk [RR], 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48-1.80, and for > or =150 mL/d; RR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.20-0.94; p for trend = 0.04). Consumption of coffee, tea, fruit juices, or wine was not associated with risk for breast cancer. Results of this study suggest that consumption of herbal tea may have a role in the prevention of breast cancer.
    Annals of Epidemiology 07/2006; 16(7):503-8. · 2.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although dairy products have been found to be associated with an elevated risk of prostate cancer, studies investigating the potential effect of Ca are limited, and findings are inconsistent. The objective of the present study was to test the relationship between the risk of prostate cancer and consumption of dairy products and Ca. The analysis included 2776 men from the French SU.VI.MAX (Supplementation en Vitamines et Minéraux Antioxydants) prospective study, among whom sixty-nine developed prostate cancer during the follow-up period (median: 7.7 years). Food consumption was assessed at inclusion from repeated 24 h records and nutrient intake was calculated using a food composition table. A higher risk of prostate cancer was observed among subjects with higher dairy product (relative risk (RR; 95 % CI), 4th quartile v. 1st: 1.35 (1.02, 1.78), P = 0.04) and Ca intake (RR (95 % CI), 4th quartile v. 1st: 2.43 (1.05, 5.62), P = 0.04). Nevertheless, we identified a harmful effect of yoghurt consumption upon the risk of prostate cancer (RR (95 % CI), increment 125 g/d: 1.61 (1.07, 2.43), P = 0.02) independently of the Ca content. Our data support the hypothesis that dairy products have a harmful effect with respect to the risk of prostate cancer, largely related to Ca content. The higher risk of prostate cancer with linear increasing yoghurt consumption seems to be independent of Ca and may be related to some other component.
    British Journal Of Nutrition 04/2006; 95(3):539-45. · 3.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Based on the mean retail price of 691 foods grouped in 7 food-groups and 26 sub-groups, and on the consumption of these foods by 4 834 participants to the SUVIMAX study, we estimated the cost, the nutrient density and the excess in undesirable components in 10 MJ provided by each food group and sub-group. Meat/fish/eggs and fruits and vegetables, which are the most expensive sources of energy, have the highest nutritional quality. High sugar, fat and salt containing products and added fats, which are the cheapest sources of energy, have the lowest nutritional quality. Unrefined staples are interesting because they are cheap sources of energy that have a low content in undesirable components. In each group, some food-groups have a higher nutritional quality/price ratio than others, suggesting that, by selecting them preferentially, a healthy diet could be obtained at a moderate cost.
    Cahiers de Nutrition et de Diététique 04/2006; 41(2).
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of the present work was to assess the relationship between serum Se concentrations and environmental determinants (i.e. lifestyle, social activity, geographic region, urban status, education, familial status, physical activity, BMI, tobacco, and food and alcohol consumption). Baseline results from 13 017 subjects (7876 women aged 35-60 and 5141 men aged 45-60) who participated in the SU.VI.M.AX (Supplémentation en Vitamines et Minéraux Antioxydants) study were analysed. Fewer than 2 % of the volunteers had a serum Se status under 0.75 micromol/l, which has been quoted as the cut-off of biological Se sub-deficiency. Women had significantly lower serum Se concentrations than men (1.09 (sd 0.19) micromol/l (n 7423) and 1.14 (sd 0.20) micromol/l (n 4915), P<0.0001, respectively). Significant differences in serum Se concentrations were observed between geographic areas. In both sexes, the serum Se concentration increased with alcohol, meat and fish consumption, and decreased with smoking. In premenopausal women, the serum Se concentration was higher in contraceptive-pill users than in non-users. In women only, age was associated with increased serum Se concentrations, and obesity (BMI> or =30 kg/m2) was associated with decreased serum Se levels. In men, we observed a decrease in serum Se concentrations with increased consumption of vegetables and fruits. In conclusion, though few of the volunteers participating in the SU.VI.M.AX study had Se status in the sub-deficiency range, 83 % of women and 75 % of men had serum concentrations below the value considered optimal for glutathione peroxidase activity. The largest Se associations in both sexes were found with regions, smoking, alcohol, meat and fish consumption. Further studies are needed to understand the difference in Se status between genders.
    British Journal Of Nutrition 02/2006; 95(2):313-20. · 3.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the relative contribution of 10 created food groups to total fat intake in middle-aged subjects. The relationship of added oil and fat intake with region of residence and educational level was also assessed. Cross-sectional study. Participants of the French Supplémentation en Vitamines et Minéraux Antioxydants study who completed at least six 24-hour dietary records after inclusion into the study (N=6,572). Added oils and fats were the main source of total fat intake. Animal fat and margarine intakes showed a significant inverse association with educational level, whereas oils with monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) were positively associated with education level. Animal fat intake was significantly higher in the western and northern parts of France (54.2% and 50.4%) and lower in the Mediterranean Coast (39.0%). A significant inverse gradient was found with oils with polyunsaturated fatty acids or MUFA in the southwest and the Mediterranean Coast compared with the northern part of France. We showed a north to south gradient for animal fat intake and the opposite for oils with MUFA and polyunsaturated fatty acid in France. This gradient parallels the known disparities for cardiovascular mortality in this country. This should contribute to adapting dietary guidelines for dietary change in a public health perspective.
    Journal of the American Dietetic Association 01/2006; 105(12):1889-94. · 3.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Increased consumption of dietary fiber is widely recommended to maintain or improve health, but knowledge of the relation between dietary fiber sources and cardiovascular disease risk factors is limited. We examined the relation between the source or type of dietary fiber intake and cardiovascular disease risk factors in a cohort of adult men and women. In a cross-sectional study, quintiles of fiber intake were determined from dietary records, separately for 2532 men and 3429 women. Age- and multivariate-controlled logistic models investigated the odds ratios of abnormal markers for quintiles 2-5 of fiber intake compared with the lowest quintile. The highest total dietary fiber and nonsoluble dietary fiber intakes were associated with a significantly (P < 0.05) lower risk of overweight and elevated waist-to-hip ratio, blood pressure, plasma apolipoprotein (apo) B, apo B:apo A-I, cholesterol, triacylglycerols, and homocysteine. Soluble dietary fiber was less effective. Fiber from cereals was associated with a lower body mass index, blood pressure, and homocysteine concentration; fiber from vegetables with a lower blood pressure and homocysteine concentration; and fiber from fruit with a lower waist-to-hip ratio and blood pressure. Fiber from dried fruit or nuts and seeds was associated with a lower body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, and fasting apo B and glucose concentrations. Fiber from pulses had no specific effect. Dietary fiber intake is inversely correlated with several cardiovascular disease risk factors in both sexes, which supports its protective role against cardiovascular disease and recommendations for its increased consumption.
    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 12/2005; 82(6):1185-94. · 6.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess relationships between energy, nutrient and food intakes, alcohol consumption, smoking status and body mass index (BMI), and serum concentrations of beta-carotene, alpha-tocopherol, vitamin C, selenium and zinc. Data on health status, alcohol consumption, smoking habits, anthropometric data and biochemical measurements were obtained in 1821 women aged 35-60 y and 1307 men aged 45-60 y, participant to the SU.VI.MAX Study. Data on dietary intake were available on a subsample who reported six 24-h dietary records during the first 18 months of the study. Women had higher baseline serum beta-carotene and vitamin C concentrations and lower concentration for serum vitamin E, zinc and selenium than men. In women, younger age was associated with lowered mean concentration of serum beta-carotene, vitamin E and selenium. In men, only differences were observed for serum zinc, which was lower in older men. Current smokers of both sexes had significantly lower concentrations of serum beta-carotene, vitamin C and selenium, and, only in women, of vitamin E, than nonsmokers. Alcohol consumers had lower concentrations of serum beta-carotene and higher selenium concentrations. Serum beta-carotene and vitamin C concentrations were lower in obese subjects. There were positive associations of dietary beta-carotene, vitamin C and E with their serum concentrations. Age, nutrient and alcohol intakes, serum cholesterol, BMI and smoking status explained 15.2% of the variance of serum beta-carotene in men and 13.9% in women, and 10.8 and 10.0% for serum vitamin C, and 26.3 and 28.6% for serum vitamin E, respectively. Serum antioxidant nutrient concentrations are primarily influenced by sex, age, obesity, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption and especially dietary intake of those antioxidant nutrients.
    European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 11/2005; 59(10):1181-90. · 2.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The SUpplementation en VItamines et Mineraux AntioXydants (SU.VI.MAX) study, a randomised double-blind, primary-prevention trial showed that after 7.5 years, low-dose antioxidant supplementation lowered the total cancer incidence in men, but not in women. To explain this difference in the impact of antioxidant supplementation in men and women, we hypothesised that the effect of supplementation is dependent on initial antioxidant status; 12 741 French adults (7713 females aged 35--60 years; 5028 males aged 45--60 years) received daily antioxidant supplementation (120 mg vitamin C, 30 mg vitamin E, 6 mg beta-carotene, 100 microg Se, 20 mg Zn daily) or a matching placebo. Cut-off limits for baseline serum concentrations of the different antioxidant vitamins and minerals were defined as follows for both men and women: 0.3 micromol/l for beta-carotene, 11.4 micromol/l for vitamin C, 15 micromol/l for vitamin E, 0.75 micromol/l for Se and 10.7 micromol/l for Zn. The percentage of men with serum concentrations under cut-off limits was higher for vitamins C and E and beta-carotene in those who developed a cancer than in those who did not. The risk of cancer was higher in men with baseline concentrations of serum vitamin C or vitamin E under cut-off limits, but not in women. The effect of supplementation was greater in men with baseline serum concentrations of vitamin C, vitamin E and beta-carotene below the cut-off limits compared with those above it. This effect was maintained only for vitamin E after adjustment for age, tobacco, and alcohol consumption and BMI. No effect of supplementation could be seen in women. Baseline antioxidant status is related to the risk of cancer in men but not in women and therefore does not entirely explain the differences observed in the effect of antioxidant supplementation on cancer risk between sexes in the SU.VI.MAX study.
    British Journal Of Nutrition 08/2005; 94(1):125-32. · 3.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Alcohol consumption may play a role in the development of obesity but the relationship between alcohol and weight is still unclear. The aim of our study was to assess the cross-sectional association of intakes of total alcohol and of specific alcoholic beverages (wine, beer and spirits) with waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and body mass index (BMI) in a large sample of adults from all over France. Cross-sectional. Participants were free-living healthy volunteers of the SU.VI.MAX study (an intervention study on the effects of antioxidant supplementation on chronic diseases). For 1481 women aged 35-60 years and 1210 men aged 45-60 years, intakes of total alcohol and specific alcoholic beverages were assessed by six 24-hour dietary records. BMI and WHR were measured during a clinical examination the year after. A J-shaped relationship was found between total alcohol consumption and WHR in both sexes and between total alcohol consumption and BMI in men only (P<0.05). The same relationships were observed with wine (P<0.05); men and women consuming less than 100 g day(-1) had a lower BMI (men only) and WHR than non-drinkers or those consuming more. Spirits consumption was positively associated with BMI (linear regression coefficient beta=0.21, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.09-0.34 and beta=0.22, 95% CI: 0.06-0.39 for men and women, respectively) and WHR (beta=0.003, 95% CI: 0.001-0.005 and beta=0.003, 95%CI: 0.0002-0.006) in both sexes in a linear fashion. No relationship between beer consumption and BMI or WHR was found. If confirmed in longitudinal studies, our results indicate that consumption of alcoholic beverages may be a risk factor for obesity.
    Public Health Nutrition 06/2005; 8(3):315-20. · 2.25 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

969 Citations
96.51 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007–2008
    • Université Paris 13 Nord
      • Unité de recherche en épidémiologie nutritonnelle - UREN (UMR 557) Inserm - INRA - CNAM
      Île-de-France, France
    • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2006–2007
    • Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble
      Grenoble, Rhône-Alpes, France
    • Le Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine Rhône-Alpes
      Rhône-Alpes, France
    • Pierre and Marie Curie University - Paris 6
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2003–2006
    • French Institute of Health and Medical Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2002–2006
    • Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers
      • Institut National des Sciences et Techniques de la Documentation
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2004–2005
    • INstitut de l’Information Scientifique et Technique - Inist
      Vandoeuvre, Lorraine, France