Xiaomei Ouyang

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States

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Publications (16)34.9 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Mitochondrial mutations have been shown to be responsible for syndromic and nonsyndromic hearing impairment. Aim: To assess the genotypic-phenotypic correlation of mitochondrial DNA mutations in three generations of a single family. Methods: A single family with maternally inherited diabetes and hearing loss was recruited. Genomic DNA was subject to polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (ApaI) for A3243G mutation detection and confirmation with direct DNA sequencing. The degree of heteroplasmy for the A3243G mutation in blood DNA samples was quantified. In addition, we reviewed audiological data of A3243G-associated hearing loss cases from the literature to provide details of audiologic features. Results: Six of 11 family members were recruited. All affected members harbored the A3243G mutation. Four of six members had diabetes. Five of five affected members demonstrated hearing loss ranging from mild to severe. The degree of heteroplasmy ranged from 5.51% to 27.74%. Conclusions: Patients with a greater percentage of heteroplasmy have a trend toward more severe phenotypic presentations. Hearing loss is bilateral, sensorineural, and symmetric. The main audiogram shapes found were sloping. Additional studies are necessary to clarify the relationship between degree of heteroplasmy and phenotypic presentation.
    Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers 03/2013; · 1.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mutations in phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase 1 (PRPS1) are associated with a spectrum of non-syndromic to syndromic hearing loss. PRPS1 transcript levels have been shown to be regulated by the microRNA-376 genes. The long primary RNA transcript of the miR-376 RNA cluster members undergo extensive and simultaneous A → I editing at one or both of two specific sites (+4 and +44) in particular human and mouse tissues. The PRPS1 gene, which contains target sites for the edited version of miR-376a-5p within its 3'UTR, has been shown to be repressed in a tissue-specific manner. To investigate whether the transcription of Prps1 is regulated by miR-376 cluster members in the mouse inner ear, we first quantified the expression of the mature miR-376 RNAs by quantitative real-time-PCR. The spatio-temporal patterns of miR-376 expression were assessed by in situ hybridization. Finally, we examined whether A →I editing of pri-miR-376 RNAs occurs in mouse inner ear by direct sequencing. Our data showed that the miR-376a-3p, b-3p, c-3p are present in mouse embryonic inner ears and intensive expression of miR-376a-3p/b-3p was detected in the sensory epithelia and ganglia of both auditory and vestibular portions of the inner ear. In adult inner ear, the expression of miR-376a-3p/b-3p is restricted within ganglion neurons of auditory and vestibular systems as well as the cells in the stria vascularis. Only unedited pri-miR-376 RNAs were detected in the cochlea suggesting that the activity of PRPS1 in the inner ear may not be regulated through the editing of miR-376 cluster.
    International Journal of Experimental Pathology 12/2012; 93(6):450-7. · 2.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Audiometric patterns have been shown to indirectly provide information regarding the pathophysiology of presbycusis and be useful in the phenotyping of hereditary deafness. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Hospital-based cohort study of adults with presbycusis, comparing the association of audiometric patterns and polymorphisms of antioxidant enzymes that have been linked to presbycusis: GSTT1, GSTM1 and NAT2. All subjects underwent a clinical evaluation and completed questionnaires regarding ototoxicity and noise exposure. Pure-tone threshold audiometry was obtained and subjects' audiograms were classified into specific patterns. DNA was extracted from blood and the polymorphisms of GSTT1, GSTM1, and the NAT2 variants (NAT2* 5A; NAT2* 6A,B) were analyzed by PCR. RESULTS: The audiometric patterns that were more prevalent in our cohort were "High-Frequency Steeply Sloping" or HFSS (33%), "High-Frequency Gently Sloping" or HFGS (31%), and "Flat" (27%), with other patterns being rare. We did not find a statistical significant effect of gender, age, hearing level, and ear side on the audiometric pattern. Subjects with mutant alleles for GSTT1 were more likely to have a HFSS audiogram than subjects with the wild type genotype. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort, there was a similar prevalence for the three audiometric configurations HFSS, HFGS, and Flat, with other configurations being rare. Subjects with mutant alleles for GSTT1 were more likely to have a HFSS audiogram than subjects with the wild type genotype, suggesting that the basal turn of the cochlea is susceptible to GSTT1 regulated oxidative stress. However, further studies of audioprofiles with larger sample sizes may be needed to establish phenotype-genotype correlations in presbycusis. Laryngoscope, 2012.
    The Laryngoscope 09/2012; · 1.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Deafness is a heterogeneous trait with many known genetic and environmental causes. Hereditary hearing loss is an extremely common disorder in the general population. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are known to be associated with nonsyndromic deafness (NSD) and syndromic deafness. The objective of this article is to investigate the frequency of common mitochondrial mutations (A1555G, G7444A, and A3243G) in an ethnically diverse cohort of probands with NSD from South Florida. These patients were ascertained at the University of Miami. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and direct sequencing methods were used for mutation screening in a cohort of 217 patients with NSD. The frequency of common mitochondrial mutations is 1.84% (4/217) in this cohort. A1555G and G7444A accounted for four patients with NSD. Our mutation frequencies are comparable with those previously reported in other populations, indicating that mutations in mtDNA are an important cause of NSD in our patient cohort.
    Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers 08/2012; 16(9):1146-8. · 1.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives Determine the diagnostic yield of a shared genetic testing algorithm in adult and pediatric populations with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and recommend effective testing strategies to evaluate for genetic causes of deafness in patients presenting with idiopathic sensorineural hearing loss. Study Design Hospital-based cohort study. Setting University of Miami outpatient otology clinics between 2001 and 2010. Subjects Two hundred twenty-one adult and 163 pediatric patients with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss. Methods Peripheral blood samples were screened for mutations in GJB2 and GJB6 and mitochondrial DNA mutations 1555A>G, 7444G>A, and 3243A>G. Audiometric data and family history were also collected. Results GJB2/GJB6-related deafness was diagnosed in 23 of 163 pediatric patients (14%) compared with only 3 of 221 adults (1%). All adults had a family history of hearing loss, and 2 patients noted deafness onset at birth. Nineteen GJB2 mutations were identified with 35delG the most common mutation. The 35delG homozygous state was the most common pathogenic genotype (54%). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations were found in 6 adult probands (3%). No mtDNA mutations were found in pediatric patients. Conclusion Testing for common GJB2/GJB6 mutations in pediatric patients has considerable value in establishing an etiologic diagnosis for SNHL. Similar testing in adults is of very low yield except perhaps in cases of early-onset SNHL or strong family history. Mitochondrial DNA testing should be considered in adults with idiopathic SNHL.
    Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery 07/2012; 147(5):932-6. · 1.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of mutations in the GJB2 gene, the GJB6-D13S1830 deletion and the four common mitochondrial mutations (A1555G, A3243G, A7511C and A7445G) in a South African population. METHODS: Using single-strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequencing for screening GJB2 mutation; Multiplex PCR Amplification for GJB6-D13S1830 deletion and Restriction Fragment-Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis for the four common mtDNA mutations. We screened 182 hearing impaired students to determine the frequency of these mutations in the population. RESULTS: None of the reported disease causing mutations in GJB2 nor any novel pathogenic mutations in the coding region were detected, in contrast to the findings among Caucasians. The GJB6-D13S1830 deletion and the mitochondrial mutations were not observed in this group. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that GJB2 may not be a significant deafness gene among sub-Saharan Africans, pointing to other unidentified genes as responsible for nonsyndromic hearing loss in these populations.
    International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology 03/2011; · 0.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The myosin VIIA (MYO7A) gene encodes a protein classified as an unconventional myosin. Mutations within MYO7A can lead to both syndromic and non-syndromic hearing impairment in humans. Among different mutations reported in MYO7A, only five led to non-syndromic sensorineural deafness autosomal dominant type 11 (DFNA11). Here, we present the clinical, genetic and molecular characteristics of two large Chinese DFNA11 families with either high- or low-frequency hearing loss. Affected individuals of family DX-J033 have a sloping audiogram at young ages with high frequency are most affected. With increasing age, all test frequencies are affected. Affected members of family HB-S037 present with an ascending audiogram affecting low frequencies at young ages, and then all frequencies are involved with increasing age. Genome-wide linkage analysis mapped the disease loci within the DFNA11 interval in both families. DNA sequencing of MYO7A revealed two novel nucleotide variations, c.652G > A (p.D218N) and c.2011G > A (p.G671S), in the two families. It is for the first time that the mutations identified in MYO7A in the present study are being implicated in DFNA11 in a Chinese population. For the first time, we tested electrocochleography (ECochG) in a DFNA11 family with low-frequency hearing loss. We speculate that the low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss in this DFNA11 family was not associated with endolymphatic hydrops.
    Journal of Human Genetics 01/2011; 56(1):64-70. · 2.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study is to assess clinical characteristics of individuals with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (NSSNHL) with genetic mutations in GJB2 and/or GJB6. We describe and compare one group with biallelic mutations against a group of heterozygote mutation carriers. A total of 350 patients between the ages of 3 months and 80 years referred to a tertiary care outpatient otology practice for NSSNHL were screened for genetic mutations. Direct sequencing of GJB2 and polymerase chain reaction analysis of GJB6 was performed and clinical data from history and physical, audiologic testing and radiographic studies were reviewed. Thirty-two patients were found to have biallelic mutations (incidence of 9.1%). Twenty-five patients were found to have only one GJB2 mutation (incidence of 7.1%). Severe to profound hearing loss occurred in 85% of the homozygote group and 38% of the heterozygote group. Both groups similarly had a propensity toward bilateral, symmetric, nonprogressive hearing loss with rare inner ear malformations on radiologic imaging. These two patient populations have similar incidences in a cohort of patients evaluated for NSSNHL, which is higher than general population heterozygote carrier rates. Heterozygote mutation carriers had less hearing impairment, but most other factors demonstrated no differences. These results support the theory of an unidentified genetic factor contributing to hearing loss in some heterozygote carriers. Therefore, genetic counseling should consider the complexity of their genetic factors and the limitations of current screening.
    The Laryngoscope 01/2011; 121(4):811-4. · 1.98 Impact Factor
  • The Laryngoscope 10/2010; 120(S3):S92. · 1.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A proposed mechanism for presbycusis is a significant increase in oxidative stress in the cochlea. The enzymes glutathione S-transferase (GST) and N-acetyltransferase (NAT) are two classes of antioxidant enzymes active in the cochlea. In this work, we sought to investigate the association of different polymorphisms of GSTM1, GSTT1, and NAT2 and presbycusis and analyze whether ethnicity has an effect in the genotype-phenotype associations. Case-control study of 134 DNA samples. University-based tertiary care center. Clinical, audiometric, and DNA testing of 55 adults with presbycusis and 79 control patients with normal hearing. The GSTM1 null genotype was present in 77 percent of white Hispanics and 51 percent of white non-Hispanics (Fisher's exact test, 2-tail, P = 0.0262). The GSTT1 null genotype was present in 34 percent of control patients and in 60 percent of white presbycusis subjects (P = 0.0067, odds ratio [OR] = 2.843, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.379-5.860). The GSTM1 null genotype was more frequent in presbycusis subjects, i.e., 48 percent of control patients and 69 percent of white subjects carried this deletion (P = 0.0198, OR = 2.43, 95% CI = 1.163-5.067). The NAT2*6A mutant genotype was more frequent among subjects with presbycusis (60%) than in control patients (34%; P = 0.0086, OR = 2.88, 95% CI = 1.355-6.141). We showed an increased risk of presbycusis among white subjects carrying the GSTM1 and the GSTT1 null genotype and the NAT*6A mutant allele. Subjects with the GSTT1 null genotypes are almost three times more likely to develop presbycusis than those with the wild type. The GSTM1 null genotype was more prevalent in white Hispanics than in white non-Hispanics, but the GSTT1 and NAT2 polymorphisms were equally represented in the two groups.
    Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery 08/2010; 143(2):263-8. · 1.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report a large Chinese family with X-linked postlingual nonsyndromic hearing impairment in which the critical linkage interval spans a genetic distance of 5.41 cM and a physical distance of 15.1 Mb that overlaps the DFN2 locus. Mutation screening of the PRPS1 gene in this family and in the three previously reported DFN2 families identified four different missense mutations in PRPS1. These mutations result in a loss of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase 1 activity, as was shown in silico by structural analysis and was shown in vitro by enzymatic activity assays in erythrocytes and fibroblasts from patients. By in situ hybridization, we demonstrate expression of Prps1 in murine vestibular and cochlea hair cells, with continuous expression in hair cells and postnatal expression in the spiral ganglion. Being the second identified gene associated with X-linked nonsyndromic deafness, PRPS1 will be a good candidate gene for genetic testing for X-linked nonsyndromic hearing loss.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 12/2009; 86(1):65-71. · 11.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have characterized the spectrum of SLC26A4 mutations and clinical features in a population of mainland Chinese patients with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA). Cross-sectional clinical genetic study. Tertiary care outpatient otolaryngology clinic. A total of 32 subjects identified with bilateral EVA using high-resolution CT were screened for mutations in SLC26A4 by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing methods. A total of 13 different mutations were identified in the SLC26A4 gene, five of which are novel. A total of 88 percent of the patients harbored biallelic mutations, 11 patients were homozygotes, and 17 were compound heterozygotes. Four patients were found to carry a single SLC26A4 mutation. The IVS7-2A>G mutation was the most frequent, accounting for 60 percent of the mutant alleles. We have not found any correlations between the type of SLC26A4 mutations and the type, degree, and progression of hearing loss. There are significant proportions of patients with asymmetric (26%), progressive (32%), or fluctuating hearing loss (21%). Our data confirm the high prevalence of SLC26A4 mutations in Chinese patients with SNHL and EVA. We could not establish any relationship between genotype and phenotype. However, the high incidence of asymmetric, progressive, and fluctuating hearing loss found in the current study indicates that patients with those features should be routinely screened for SLC26A4 mutation in addition to diagnosis of EVA using CT or MRI.
    Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery 10/2009; 141(4):502-8. · 1.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by moderate to severe hearing impairment and progressive visual loss due to retinitis pigmentosa (RP). To identify novel mutations and determine the frequency of USH2A mutations as a cause of USH2, we have carried out mutation screening of all 72 coding exons and exon-intron splice sites of the USH2A gene. A total of 20 USH2 American probands of European descent were analyzed using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and direct sequencing methods. Ten different USH2A mutations were identified in 55% of the probands, five of which were novel mutations. The detected mutations include three missense, three frameshifts and four nonsense mutations, with c.2299delG/p.E767fs mutation, accounting for 38.9% of the pathological alleles. Two cases were homozygotes, two cases were compound heterozygotes and one case had complex allele with three variants. In seven probands, only one USH2A mutation was detected and no pathological mutation was found in the remaining eight individuals. Altogether, our data support the fact that c.2299delG/p.E767fs is indeed the most common USH2A mutation found in USH2 patients of European Caucasian background. Thus, if screening for mutations in USH2A is considered, it is reasonable to screen for the c.2299delG mutation first.
    Journal of Human Genetics 10/2009; 54(12):732-8. · 2.53 Impact Factor
  • Xiaomei Ouyang, Denise Yan
    Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery 08/2007; 137(2). · 1.73 Impact Factor
  • Xiaomei Ouyang, Li L. Du BSc, Denise Yan
    Otolaryngology-head and Neck Surgery - OTOLARYNGOL HEAD NECK SURG. 01/2007; 137(2).
  • Denise Yan, Xiaomei Ouyang
    Otolaryngology-head and Neck Surgery - OTOLARYNGOL HEAD NECK SURG. 01/2007; 137(2).

Publication Stats

74 Citations
34.90 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
      • Department of Otolaryngology
      Miami, Florida, United States
  • 2009–2012
    • University of Miami
      • Department of Otolaryngology
      Coral Gables, FL, United States
  • 2011
    • University of the Witwatersrand
      Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa