Esther Brusse

Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands

Are you Esther Brusse?

Claim your profile

Publications (27)135.96 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The phenotype of Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is highly variable, and thus the disorder might be underdiagnosed. In this study we have reviewed the undiagnosed cases among patients referred for suspected BMD in the period 1985–1995. At that time DNA analysis of the DMD gene was the only routinely available diagnostic test for patients suspected of having muscular dystrophy. Over the last decade sequencing techniques have been developed for the detection of small mutations in the DMD gene. Our aim was to investigate whether BMD had been genetically underdiagnosed in the early decade of DNA analysis and, if so, whether we could improve the diagnostic yield by applying new techniques. Previously, in 79 of 185 referrals for BMD testing no deletions or duplications had been found. The original requisition forms for DNA analysis were re-evaluated; Forty-six cases were excluded because clinical data were lacking or not suggestive for BMD or the patients were known to be deceased. In 33 cases the clinical information was compatible with BMD and those were considered potentially relevant for re-analysis of the DMD gene. Sequencing could be performed on 31 stored DNA samples. Six different mutations, including four novel ones, were found. Long term clinical follow-up in these adult males revealed that one patient was asymptomatic, one had mild symptoms and four had lost ambulation due to progressive limb girdle weakness. Conclusion: We conclude that extending DNA analysis by sequencing the DMD gene can be helpful in identifying BMD in male patients in whom previously no deletions or duplications were found. A delayed diagnosis can still be valuable for the proband or the relatives of the BMD patients.
    Neuromuscular Disorders 10/2014; 24(s 9–10):794. · 3.46 Impact Factor
  • Source
  • Source
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Vascular abnormalities and glycogen accumulation in vascular smooth muscle fibres have been described in Pompe disease. Using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), the gold standard methodology for determining aortic stiffness, we studied whether aortic stiffness is increased in patients with Pompe disease. Eighty-four adult Pompe patients and 179 age- and gender-matched volunteers participated in this cross-sectional case-controlled study. Intima media thickness and the distensibility of the right common carotid artery were measured using a Duplex scanner. Aortic augmentation index, central pulse pressure, aortic reflexion time and cfPWV were assessed using the SphygmoCor® system. CfPWV was higher in patients than in volunteers (8.8 versus 7.4 m/s, p < 0.001). This difference was still present after adjustment for age, gender, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate and diabetes mellitus (p = 0.001), and was shown by subgroup analysis to apply to the 40-59 years age group (p = 0.004) and 60+ years age group (p = 0.01), but not to younger age groups (p = 0.99). Except for a shorter aortic reflexion time (p = 0.02), indirect indicators of arterial stiffness did not differ between patients and volunteers. Relative to volunteers (20 %), more Pompe patients had a history of hypertension (36 %, p = 0.005), and the MAP was higher than in volunteers (100 versus 92 mmHg, p < 0.001). This study shows that patients with non-classic Pompe disease have increased aortic stiffness and blood pressure. Whether this is due to glycogen accumulation requires further investigation. To reduce the potential risk of cardiovascular diseases, we recommend that blood pressure and other common cardiovascular risk factors are monitored regularly.
    Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease 01/2014; · 4.07 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pompe disease has a broad clinical spectrum, in which the phenotype is partially explained by the genotype. The aim of this study was to describe phenotypical variation among siblings with non-classic Pompe disease. We hypothesized that siblings and families with the same genotype share more similar phenotypes than the total population of non-classic Pompe patients, and that this might reveal genotype-phenotype correlations. We identified all Dutch families in which two or three siblings were diagnosed with Pompe disease and described genotype, acid alpha-glucosidase activity, age at symptom onset, presenting symptoms, specific clinical features, mobility and ventilator dependency. We identified 22 families comprising two or three siblings. All carried the most common mutation c.-32-13 T > G in combination with another pathogenic mutation. The median age at symptom onset was 33 years (range 1--62 years). Within sibships symptom onset was either in childhood or in adulthood. The median variation in symptom onset between siblings was nine years (range 0--31 years). Presenting symptoms were similar across siblings in 14 out of 22 families. Limb girdle weakness was most frequently reported. In some families ptosis or bulbar weakness were present in all siblings. A large variation in disease severity (based on wheelchair/ventilator dependency) was observed in 11 families. This variation did not always result from a difference in duration of the disease since a third of the less affected siblings had a longer course of the disease. Enzyme activity could not explain this variation either. In most families male patients were more severely affected. Finally, symptom onset varied substantially in twelve families despite the same GAA genotype. In most families with non-classic Pompe disease siblings share a similar phenotype regarding symptom onset, presenting symptoms and specific clinical features. However, in some families the course and severity of disease varied substantially. This phenotypical variation was also observed in families with identical GAA genotypes. The commonalities and differences indicate that besides genotype, other factors such as epigenetic and environmental effects influence the clinical presentation and disease course.
    Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases 11/2013; 8(1):182. · 4.32 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pompe disease is a hereditary metabolic myopathy, for which enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been available since 2006. We investigated whether ERT reduces fatigue in adult patients with Pompe disease. METHODS: In this prospective international observational survey, we used the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) to measure fatigue. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to analyze the data over time. In a subgroup of patients, we also evaluated muscle strength using the Medical Research Council Scale, measured pulmonary function as Forced Vital Capacity, and assessed depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. RESULTS: We followed 163 patients for a median period of 4years before ERT and for 3years during ERT. Before ERT, the mean FSS score remained stable at around 5.3 score points; during ERT, scores improved significantly by 0.13 score points per year (p<0.001). Fatigue decreased mainly in women, in older patients and in those with shorter disease duration. Patients' improvements in fatigue were moderately correlated with the effect of ERT on depression (r 0.55; CI 95% 0.07 to 0.70) but not with the effect of ERT on muscle strength or pulmonary function. CONCLUSIONS: Fatigue is a common and disabling problem in patients with early and advanced stages of Pompe disease. Our finding that ERT helps to reduce fatigue is therefore important for this patient population, irrespective of the mechanisms underlying this effect.
    Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 04/2013; · 2.83 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the variability of serum IgG in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). METHODS: All 25 CIDP patients had active but stable disease and were treated with individually optimised fixed dose IVIg regimens. IgG was measured by turbidimetry and variability was defined as coefficient of variation (CV). RESULTS: The intra-patient variability of the pre-treatment IgG levels, post-treatment levels and increase in serum IgG shortly after IVIg (ΔIgG) was low (mean CV=3%, 4%, 10%). The inter-patient variability between patients treated with the same dose and interval was low in pre-treatment, post-treatment and ΔIgG level (mean CV=13%, 11%, 20%). The ΔIgG levels were associated with IVIg dosage (rs=0.78, p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Clinically stable CIDP patients show a steady-state in serum IgG after serial IVIg infusions. The low intra- and inter-patient variability in IgG may indicate that constant levels are required to reach this stability.
    Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry 03/2013; · 4.87 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Spinocerebellar ataxias are phenotypically, neuropathologically and genetically heterogeneous. The locus of autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCAR7) was previously linked to chromosome band 11p15. We have identified TPP1 as the causative gene for SCAR7 by exome sequencing. A missense and a splice site variant in TPP1, cosegregating with the disease, were found in a previously described SCAR7 family and also in another patient with a SCAR7 phenotype. TPP1, encoding the tripeptidyl peptidase 1 enzyme, is known as the causative gene for late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis disease 2 (CLN2 disease). CLN2 disease is characterized by epilepsy, loss of vision, ataxia and a rapidly progressive course, leading to early death. SCAR7 patients showed ataxia and low activity of tripeptidyl peptidase 1, but no ophthalmologic abnormalities or epilepsy. Also, the slowly progressive evolution of the disease until old age and absence of ultra structural curvilinear profiles is different from the known CLN2 phenotypes. Our findings now expand the phenotypes related to TPP1-variants to SCAR7. In spite of the limited sample size and measurements a putative genotype-phenotype correlation may be drawn: we hypothesize that loss of function variants abolishing TPP1 enzyme activity lead to CLN2 disease, while variants that diminish TPP1 enzyme activity lead to SCAR7.
    Human Mutation 02/2013; · 5.21 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Increased activity of the enzyme creatine kinase (CK) in serum is not infrequently encountered in routine diagnostic laboratory investigations. Patients are often referred to a neurologist specialized in neuromuscular disorders for evaluation. However, as in many cases hyperCKemia is physiological or results from physical activity or muscle trauma, further investigations are often unnecessary. We report four cases of hyperCKemia, two of which were physiological or due to non-neuromuscular factors (medication, physical activity). In the other two patients, the hyperCKemia was the first recognized sign of an underlying neuromuscular disorder. In these two cases, specific aspects of the history or physical examination prompted further investigations. We discuss various physiological and other non-neuromuscular factors that may cause hyperCKemia. It is important to recognize these causes before referral to a neurologist with neuromuscular expertise. We present guidelines for ancillary investigations by general practitioners or specialists.
    Nederlands tijdschrift voor geneeskunde 01/2013; 157(41):A6315.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Achieving long-term remission after a limited more intense treatment period would prevent prolonged use of corticosteroids or IV immunoglobulin (IVIg) in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP). In this prospective cohort study we present long-term follow-up data on patients included in a multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing 6 monthly pulses of dexamethasone with 8 months of daily prednisolone. Treatment effect was assessed with the Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment disability scale and the Rivermead Mobility Index and was categorized using the CIDP Disease Activity Status (CDAS) scale. By March 2011, 39 out of 40 patients were included with a median follow-up of 4.5 years. Cure (>5 years off treatment) or remission according to the CDAS criteria after 1 or 2 courses of pulsed dexamethasone or daily prednisolone was achieved in 10 out of 39 patients (26%). Half of the patients who were in remission after initial treatment experienced a relapse (median treatment-free interval: 17.5 months for dexamethasone, 11 months for prednisolone). Alternative diagnosis was made in 7 out of 12 (58%) who did not respond to any therapy and in none of the treatment-responsive patients. Cure or long-term remission can be achieved in about one-quarter of patients with CIDP after 1 or 2 courses of pulsed dexamethasone or 8-month daily prednisolone. In treatment-nonresponsive patients, the diagnosis CIDP should be reconsidered. This study provides Class IV evidence that pulsed dexamethasone or 8-month daily prednisolone can lead to long-term remission in CIDP.
    Neurology 03/2012; 78(14):1079-84. · 8.30 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Desmin-related myopathy (DRM) is an autosomally inherited skeletal and cardiac myopathy, mainly caused by dominant mutations in the desmin gene (DES). We describe new families carrying the p.S13F or p.N342D DES mutations, the cardiac phenotype of all carriers, and the founder effects. We collected the clinical details of all carriers of p.S13F or p.N342D. The founder effects were studied using genealogy and haplotype analysis. We identified three new index patients carrying the p.S13F mutation and two new families carrying the p.N342D mutation. In total, we summarised the clinical details of 39 p.S13F carriers (eight index patients) and of 21 p.N342D carriers (three index patients). The cardiac phenotype of p.S13F carriers is fully penetrant and severe, characterised by cardiac conduction disease and cardiomyopathy, often with right ventricular involvement. Although muscle weakness is a prominent and presenting symptom in p.N342D carriers, their cardiac phenotype is similar to that of p.S13F carriers. The founder effects of p.S13F and p.N342D were demonstrated by genealogy and haplotype analysis. DRM may occur as an apparently isolated cardiological disorder. The cardiac phenotypes of the DES founder mutations p.S13F and p.N342D are characterised by cardiac conduction disease and cardiomyopathy, often with right ventricular involvement.
    Netherlands heart journal: monthly journal of the Netherlands Society of Cardiology and the Netherlands Heart Foundation 01/2012; 20(5):219-28. · 1.41 Impact Factor
  • Neuromuscular Disorders 10/2011; 21(9):700-700. · 3.46 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To identify the prevalence and severity of fatigue and predicting factors for severe fatigue in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). We studied a cross-section of 123 patients with SCA. Six functional scales were used in a self-assessment: the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS); the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); the Rotterdam Handicap Scale (RHS); the Short Form-36 health survey, distinguishing a norm-based physical and mental component score (Nb-PCS and Nb-MCS); the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). A subset of 58 patients was clinically evaluated, measuring severity of ataxia with the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia and cognitive functioning with the Mini-Mental State Examination. Severe fatigue (FSS ≥5) was present in 69% of patients and FSS value correlated with the scores on RHS, Nb-PCS, Nb-MCS, BDI, PSQI, and ESS. There was no relation with disease duration, gender, or medication use. Multivariate analysis revealed that Nb-PCS and BDI were the best independent predictors for severe fatigue. Interestingly, the presence of visual symptoms was related to FSS value in the clinically evaluated subgroup. Fatigue is a severe and disabling symptom in adult patients with SCA, even early in the course of disease. Physical functioning and depression are the strongest predictors of fatigue. In treatment strategies, all treatable factors for fatigue should be addressed, especially depression, visual symptoms, and sleeping disorders.
    Neurology 03/2011; 76(11):953-9. · 8.30 Impact Factor
  • Neuromuscular Disorders - NEUROMUSCULAR DISORD. 01/2011; 21(9):700-700.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Different preparations of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) are considered to have comparable clinical efficacy but this has never been formally investigated. Some patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) report that some IVIg brands are more effective than others. A liquid IVIg preparation is more user friendly and potentially can be infused at a faster rate. The primary objective was to compare the efficacy of two different IVIg brands in CIDP. The secondary objective was to compare their safety. This was an investigator-initiated multi-centre randomised controlled double-blind trial. Twenty-seven patients with active but stable CIDP treated with their individual stable IVIg (Gammagard S/D) maintenance dose and interval were randomised to receive four infusions of freeze-dried 5% IVIg (Gammagard S/D) or the new liquid 10% IVIg (Kiovig). The overall disability sum score (ODSS) was used as the primary outcome scale. The equivalence margin was defined as a difference of ≤1 point in mean ΔODSS between treatment groups. Main secondary outcome scales were the MRC sum score and the Vigorimeter. Repeated measurements analysis of variance, adjusted for baseline ODSS, showed a clinically insignificant treatment difference of 0.004 (95% CI -0.4 to 0.4). We also found no significant differences in any of the other outcome measures. Besides a lower occurrence of cold shivers in patients randomised to Kiovig (p=0.03), no significant differences were found in the occurrence of adverse events. This trial demonstrated equal clinical efficacy between a freeze-dried and a liquid IVIg preparation for maintenance treatment of CIDP.
    Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry 12/2010; 81(12):1374-9. · 4.87 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pulsed high-dose dexamethasone induced long-lasting remission in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) in a pilot study. The PREDICT study aimed to compare remission rates in patients with CIDP treated with high-dose dexamethasone with rates in patients treated with standard oral prednisolone. In eight neuromuscular centres in the Netherlands and one in the UK, patients aged 18 years or older who had newly diagnosed definite or probable CIDP were randomly assigned to a treatment regimen of either pulsed high-dose dexamethasone or standard oral prednisolone. Randomisation was done with a random number generator. The primary outcome measure was remission at 12 months, defined as improvement of at least three points on the Rivermead mobility index and improvement of at least one point on the inflammatory neuropathy cause and treatment disability scale. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials, number ISRCTN07779236. Between December, 2003, and December, 2008, 40 patients were treated: 24 received dexamethasone and 16 received prednisolone. At 12 months, 16 patients were in remission: ten in the dexamethasone group and six in the prednisolone group (odds ratio [OR] 1.2, 95% CI 0.3-4.4). Most adverse events were minor and did not differ substantially between treatment groups; however, sleeplessness and Cushing's face occurred more often in the prednisolone group. Pulsed high-dose dexamethasone treatment did not induce remission more often than prednisolone treatment. A substantial proportion of patients were in remission at 12 months in both treatment groups. High-dose dexamethasone could be considered as induction therapy in CIDP, but comparison with intravenous immunoglobulin treatment is needed. The Prinses Beatrix Fonds (MAR01-0213) and the Department of Neurology, Academic Medical Center.
    The Lancet Neurology 03/2010; 9(3):245-53. · 23.92 Impact Factor
  • Thorax 03/2010; 65(3):214, 270. · 8.38 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Mutations in the DNA polymerase-gamma (POLG) gene are a major cause of clinically heterogeneous mitochondrial diseases, associated with mtDNA depletion and multiple deletions. To determine the spectrum of POLG mutations in our Dutch patient cohort, to evaluate the pathogenicity of novel mutations, and to establish genotype-phenotype correlations. The authors identified 64 predominantly recessive mutations in 37 patients from a total of 232 patients, consisting of 23 different mutations. The substitution p.A467T was most frequently observed (n = 23), but was as frequent in childhood cases as in adult cases. Five new pathogenic recessive mutations, p.Lys925ArgfsX42, p.R275X, p.G426S, p.A804T and p.R869Q were identified. The known dominant chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) mutation p.R943H was for the first time associated with premature ovarian failure as well. In 19 patients the authors identified only a single recessive mutation, or a sequence variant with unclear clinical significance. The data substantiate earlier observations that in POLG patients a fatal status epilepticus and liver failure can be triggered by sodium valproate. It is therefore important to exclude POLG mutations before administering this treatment. The clinical features of the patient are the most important features to select putative POLG mutation carriers and not the presence of mtDNA deletions or OXPHOS (oxidative phosphorylation) activity. The authors conclude that POLG mutations are an important cause of heterogeneous mitochondrial pathology and that more accurate genotype-phenotype correlations allow a more rapid genetic diagnosis and improved prognosis for mutation carriers.
    Journal of Medical Genetics 08/2009; 46(11):776-85. · 5.70 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We describe the neurological, electrophysiological, and genetic features of autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuronopathy (HMN) in a three-generation Dutch family, including 12 patients with distal muscle weakness and atrophy. The severity of disease ranged from disabling muscle weakness to a subclinical phenotype. Neurologic exams of nine patients and nerve conduction studies (NCS) and myography in five endorsed the variable presentations of HMN in this family, including patients with only lower (four), upper (one), or both upper and lower extremities involvement (four). Asymmetrical or strictly unilateral disease was noted in three patients. Three also showed pyramidal features. A genome-wide search combining SNP arrays (250K) with parametric linkage analysis identified a novel locus on chromosome 16p (mLOD = 3.28) spanning 6 Mb (rs6500882-rs7192086). Direct sequencing excluded mutations in the SIMPLE/LITAF gene (mapping to the 16p locus) and identified a pathogenic mutation (p.N88S) in BCLS2 (11q12-q14). All 12 affected relatives had the BSCL2 mutation and the chromosome 16p haplotype and showed features of motor neuron degeneration. One patient had a very mild phenotype with bilateral pes cavus, normal concentric needle electromyography but signs of motor neuron involvement at electrophysiological muscle scan (EMS). Similar EMS abnormalities in addition to abnormal NCS and myography were observed in a clinically unaffected person (carrying only the 16p haplotype). These results expand the clinical spectrum of HMN and suggest a digenic inheritance of HMN in this family with a BSCL2 mutation and a chromosome 16 locus likely contributing to the phenotype.
    Neurogenetics 05/2009; 10(4):289-97. · 3.58 Impact Factor
  • Neurology 05/2008; 70(16):1358-9. · 8.30 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

322 Citations
135.96 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006–2014
    • Erasmus MC
      • • Department of Neurology
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2013
    • Radboud University Medical Centre (Radboudumc)
      Nymegen, Gelderland, Netherlands
    • Leiden University Medical Centre
      Leyden, South Holland, Netherlands