Daniel S Heckman

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, United States

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Publications (6)17.14 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Subscapularis dysfunction following total shoulder arthroplasty can result in permanent loss of function. The lesser tuberosity osteotomy (LTO) has been proposed as a method which utilizes bone-to-bone healing to improve subscapularis function. This study evaluates the biomechanical properties of two described techniques for LTO repair. We hypothesized that a Dual Row repair would be stronger and demonstrate less cyclic displacement than a Backpack repair. Ten matched pairs of cadaveric humeri were dissected, leaving the subscapularis intact, and a lesser tuberosity osteotomy was performed. Matched shoulders were randomized to either a Backpack repair or a Dual Row repair. Repairs were subjected to cyclic loading to 180 N for 500 cycles, followed by ramp-up loading to ultimate failure. Clinical failure was defined as displacement >5 mm after 500 cycles. Displacement after 500 cycles was significantly greater for the Backpack repair (6.9 mm) than for the Dual Row repair (4.6 mm) (P = .007). Most displacement occurred on the first cycle (Backpack, 4.6 mm; Dual Row, 2.1 mm) (P < .001). There was a trend toward a higher clinical failure rate for the Backpack repair (8/10) than the Dual Row repair (3/10). Ultimate tensile strength was significantly greater for the Dual Row repair (632.3 N) than for the Backpack repair (510.9 N) (P = .01). The Dual Row technique is significantly stronger and demonstrates less cyclic displacement than the Backpack technique. Clinical studies are needed to determine the impact of LTO repair technique on subscapularis function following shoulder arthroplasty.
    Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.] 09/2010; 20(3):491-6. · 1.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this paper is to review the management of long head biceps tendon pathology, with a particular emphasis on a prior failed biceps tenotomy or tenodesis. Failed biceps tenotomy generally results from a lack of thorough preoperative discussion of potential outcomes rather than from technical problems. Patients with unsatisfactory results can be treated with conversion to a biceps tenodesis. Failed biceps tenodesis is usually recognized with persistent pain in the area of the bicipital groove, often caused by either the mechanical failure of the tenodesis or associated shoulder pathology that is not addressed at the time of the primary surgery. Operative treatment options include revision tenodesis or biceps tenotomy. The subpectoral approach provides excellent versatility and ability to meet technical objectives when performing revision tenodesis, by removing the tendon completely from the groove and preserving biceps function.
    Sports medicine and arthroscopy review 09/2010; 18(3):173-80. · 1.16 Impact Factor
  • George S Gluck, Daniel S Heckman, Selene G Parekh
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    ABSTRACT: This article provides a review of posterior tibial tendon pathology and the authors' preferred management. The tibialis posterior musculotendinous unit is the most powerful inverter of the foot and an important dynamic stabilizer of the arch. In the stance phase of the gait cycle, it serves as an initiator of both ankle plantar flexion and subtalar inversion. This creates a rigid midfoot by stabilizing the transverse tarsal joint, and allows for increased power generation by the gastrocsoleus complex through toe-off. Injuries to the posterior tibialis tendon include traumatic laceration and dislocation, as well as tenosynovitis and tendinopathy, which can lead to attenuation and rupture. If these injuries are not addressed, significant clinical deformity and disability can result.
    The American journal of sports medicine 03/2010; 38(10):2133-44. · 3.61 Impact Factor
  • Daniel S Heckman, George S Gluck, Selene G Parekh
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    ABSTRACT: Disorders of the Achilles tendon include both acute and chronic ruptures as well as a spectrum of chronic overuse injuries involving inflammatory and degenerative changes within the tendon and surrounding tissues. These injuries are relatively common in athletes as well as among the general population. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment of Achilles tendon disorders. The goals of this review are to develop a current understanding of the anatomy and diagnostic evaluation of the Achilles tendon, and to present current treatment options and the authors' preferred surgical techniques for operative management of Achilles tendon disorders.
    The American journal of sports medicine 06/2009; 37(6):1223-34. · 3.61 Impact Factor
  • Daniel S Heckman, George S Gluck, Selene G Parekh
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    ABSTRACT: Pathologic abnormality of the peroneal tendons is an uncommon but underappreciated source of lateral hindfoot pain and dysfunction that can be difficult to distinguish from lateral ankle ligament injuries. When left untreated, peroneal tendon disorders can lead to persistent lateral ankle pain and substantial functional problems. Unfortunately, the treatment recommendations for these disorders are primarily based on case series and expert opinion. The goals of this review are to develop a current understanding of the anatomy and diagnostic evaluation of the peroneal tendons, and to present current treatment options and the authors' preferred surgical techniques for operative management of peroneal tendon lesions.
    The American journal of sports medicine 04/2009; 37(3):614-25. · 3.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Peroneal tendon disorders are rare, are frequently missed, and can be a source of lateral ankle pain. Magnetic resonance imaging is the standard method of radiographic evaluation of peroneal tendon disorders; however, diagnosis and treatment are based primarily on the history and physical examination. Peroneal tenosynovitis typically responds to conservative therapy, and operative treatment is reserved for refractory cases. Operative treatment is frequently required for peroneal tendon subluxation and consists of anatomic repair or reconstruction of the superior peroneal retinaculum with or without deepening of the retromalleolar groove. Operative treatment of peroneal tendon tears is based on the amount of remaining viable tendon. Primary repair and tubularization is indicated for tears involving <50% of the tendon, and tenodesis is indicated for tears involving >50% of the tendon.
    The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery 02/2008; 90(2):404-18. · 3.23 Impact Factor