Agnès Hautefeuille

Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France

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Publications (14)74.71 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: TP53 mutation is a common event in many cancers, including pancreatic adenocarcinoma, where it occurs in 50-70 % of cases. In an effort to reactivate mutant p53 protein, several new drugs are being developed, including PRIMA-1 and PRIMA-1(Met)/APR-246 (p53 reactivation and induction of massive apoptosis). PRIMA-1 has been shown to induce apoptosis in tumor cells by reactivating p53 mutants, but its effect in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. Here we investigated the effects of PRIMA-1 on cell viability, cell cycle and expression of p53-regulated proteins in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 (mutant TP53), and CAPAN-2 (wild-type TP53) pancreatic cell lines. Treatment with PRIMA-1 selectively induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in p53 mutant cells compared to CAPAN-2 cells. The growth suppressive effect of PRIMA-1 was markedly reduced in p53 mutant cell lines transfected with p53 siRNA, supporting the role of mutant p53 in PRIMA-1 induced cell death. Moreover, treatment with the thiol group donor N-acetylcysteine completely blocked PRIMA-1-induced apoptosis and reinforced the hypothesis that thiol modifications are important for PRIMA-1 biological activity. In combination treatments, PRIMA-1 enhanced the anti-tumor activity of several chemotherapic drugs against pancreatic cancer cells and also exhibited a pronounced synergistic effect in association with the Mdm2 inhibitor Nutlin-3. Taken together, our data indicate that PRIMA-1 induces apoptosis in p53 mutant pancreatic cancer cells by promoting the re-activation of p53 and inducing proapoptotic signaling pathways, providing in vitro evidence for a potential therapeutic approach in pancreatic cancer.
    Investigational New Drugs 05/2014; · 3.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) belongs to the superfamily of uracil DNA glycosylases (UDG) and is the first enzyme in the base-excision repair pathway (BER) that removes thymine from G:T mismatches at CpG sites. This glycosylase activity has also been found to be critical for active demethylation of genes involved in embryonic development. Here we show that wild-type p53 transcriptionally regulates TDG expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and luciferase assays indicate that wild-type p53 binds to a domain of TDG promoter containing two p53 consensus response elements (p53RE) and activates its transcription. Next, we have used a panel of cell lines with different p53 status to demonstrate that TDG mRNA and protein expression levels are induced in a p53-dependent manner under different conditions. This panel includes isogenic breast and colorectal cancer cell lines with wild-type or inactive p53, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines lacking p53 or expressing a temperature-sensitive p53 mutant and normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Induction of TDG mRNA expression is accompanied by accumulation of TDG protein in both nucleus and cytoplasm, with nuclear re-localization occurring upon DNA damage in p53-competent, but not -incompetent, cells. These observations suggest a role for p53 activity in TDG nuclear translocation. Overall, our results show that TDG expression is directly regulated by p53, suggesting that loss of p53 function may affect processes mediated by TDG, thus negatively impacting on genetic and epigenetic stability.
    Cell cycle (Georgetown, Tex.) 11/2012; 11(24). · 5.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Infection by hepatitis B virus (HBV) and dietary exposure to aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) are the main risk factors for the development of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). How these factors cooperate is still largely unknown. AFB(1) activation leads to DNA adduction and mutagenesis, with a specific mutation at codon 249 in TP53 (p.R249S). So far, only limited studies have addressed the effects of AFB(1) on HBV replication. We have analysed the effects of both risk factors on p53 induction during HBV infection in HepaRG, a cell line with hepatocyte-like morphology that metabolizes AFB(1) and supports HBV infection. Exposure to AFB(1) up to 5 µM induced a downregulation of HBV replication after 48 h, as measured by a decrease in viral antigens in the culture medium (HBsAg, HBeAg and large envelope protein) and in intracellular levels of HBV transcripts, DNA and HBsAg. Conversely, HBV infection did not significantly modify AFB(1)-DNA adduct formation or repair as assessed by immunodot-blot assay, and the induction of p53 in response to AFB(1) was similar in infected and non-infected HepaRG cells. Overall, our results suggest that AFB(1) exposure decreases HBV replication, whereas DNA damage by AFB(1) and subsequent p53 induction is not affected by the presence of the virus. Thus, in HepaRG cell line, AFB(1) and HBV do not cooperate to increase DNA damage by AFB(1). Further studies on the effects of both factors in a context of chronicity are needed to better understand synergistic effects.
    Journal of General Virology 11/2011; 93(Pt 3):640-50. · 3.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies have linked lung cancer risk with a region of chromosome 15q25.1 containing CHRNA3, CHRNA5 and CHRNB4 encoding α3, α5 and β4 subunits of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), respectively. One of the strongest associations was observed for a non-silent single-nucleotide polymorphism at codon 398 in CHRNA5. Here, we have used pharmacological (antagonists) or genetic (RNA interference) interventions to modulate the activity of CHRNA5 in non-transformed bronchial cells and in lung cancer cell lines. In both cell types, silencing CHRNA5 or inhibiting receptors containing nAChR α5 with α-conotoxin MII exerted a nicotine-like effect, with increased motility and invasiveness in vitro and increasing calcium influx. The effects on motility were enhanced by addition of nicotine but blocked by inhibiting CHRNA7, which encodes the homopentameric receptor α7 subunit. Silencing CHRNA5 also decreased the expression of cell adhesion molecules P120 and ZO-1 in lung cancer cells as well as the expression of DeltaNp63α in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. These results demonstrate a role for CHRNA5 in modulating adhesion and motility in bronchial cells, as well as in regulating p63, a potential oncogene in squamous cell carcinoma.
    Carcinogenesis 05/2011; 32(9):1388-95. · 5.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: TP63 gene is a member of TP53 tumor suppressor gene family that encodes several protein isoforms involved in the process of epithelial stratification and in epithelial-mesenchyme interactions. TP63 is amplified in a significant proportion of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus (ESCC), resulting in the hyper-expression of DeltaNp63 as the major p63 isoform. To better understand the contribution of this high expression to tumorigenesis, we have analyzed the impact of intraepithelial p63 expression on the expression of cell adhesion complexes in normal esophagus and in ESCC cell lines. Cells expressing p63 showed an adhesion pattern characterized by lack of tight junctions and presence of adherens junctions. Cell differentiation was accompanied by a decrease in p63 and by a shift to adhesion patterns involving tight junctions. Silencing of p63 mRNA in ESCC cell lines resulted in a similar shift, characterized by increased expression of component of tight junctions, decreased cell-to-cell communication and downregulation of cell proliferation. These results indicate that DeltaNp63 may contribute to esophageal squamous carcinogenesis by maintaining cell adhesion patterns compatible with cell proliferation.
    International Journal of Cancer 11/2010; 127(9):2051-62. · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) is a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in many low-resource countries. Although its metabolites bind at several positions in TP53, a mutation at codon 249 (AGG to AGT, arginine to serine, p.R249S) accounts for 90% of TP53 mutations in AFB(1)-related HCC. This specificity suggests that p.R249S confers a selective advantage during hepatocarcinogenesis. Using HCC cell lines, we show that p.R249S has lost the capacity to bind to p53 response elements and to transactivate p53 target genes. In p53-null Hep3B cells, stable transfection of p.R249S or of another mutant, p.R248Q, did not induce significant changes in cell proliferation and survival after cytotoxic stress. In contrast, in a cell line that constitutively expresses both p.R249S and the hepatitis B virus antigen HBx (PLC/PRF/5), silencing of either p.R249S or HBx by RNA interference slowed down proliferation, with no additive effects when both factors were silenced. Furthermore, the two proteins appear to form a complex. In human HCC samples, mutation at codon 249 did not correlate with p.R249S protein accumulation or HBx truncation status. We suggest that p.R249S may contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis through interaction with HBx, conferring a subtle growth advantage at early steps of the transformation process, but that this interaction is not required for progression to advanced HCC.
    Carcinogenesis 08/2010; 31(8):1475-82. · 5.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The tumor suppressor p53 protein is activated by genotoxic stress and regulates genes involved in senescence, apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest. Nine p53 isoforms have been described that may modulate suppressive functions of the canonical p53 protein. Among them, Delta133p53 lacks the 132 proximal residues and has been shown to modulate p53-induced apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest. Delta133p53 is expressed from a specific mRNA, p53I4, driven by an alternative promoter P2 located between intron 1 and exon 5 of TP53 gene. Here, we report that the P2 promoter is regulated in a p53-dependent manner. Delta133p53 expression is increased in response to DNA damage by doxorubicin in p53 wild-type cell lines, but not in p53-mutated cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assays using P2 promoter deletion constructs indicate that p53 binds functional response elements located within the P2 promoter. We also show that Delta133p53 does not bind specifically to p53 consensus DNA sequence in vitro, but competes with wild-type p53 in specific DNA-binding assays. Finally, we report that Delta133p53 counteracts p53-dependent growth suppression in clonogenic assays. These observations indicate that Delta133p53 is a novel target of p53 that may participate in a negative feedback loop controlling p53 function.
    Oncogene 03/2010; 29(18):2691-700. · 8.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Large-scale culture of primary keratinocytes allows the production of large epidermal sheet surfaces for the treatment of extensive skin burns. This method is dependent upon the capacity to establish cultures of proliferating keratinocytes in conditions compatible with their clonal expansion while maintaining their capacity to differentiate into the typical squamous pattern of human epidermis. Feeder layers are critical in this process because the fibroblasts that compose this layer serve as a source of adhesion, growth and differentiation factors. In this report, we have characterise the expression patterns of p63 isoforms in primary keratinocytes cultured on two different feeder layer systems, murine 3T3 and human fibroblasts. We show that with the latter, keratinocytes express a higher ratio of Delta N to TAp63 isoform, in relation with higher clonogenic potential. These results indicate that human fibroblasts represent an adequate feeder layer system to support the culture of primary human keratinocytes.
    Bio-medical materials and engineering 01/2009; 19(4-5):365-72. · 1.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: TP63, a member of the TP53 gene family, encodes two groups of three isoforms (alpha, beta and gamma). The TAp63 isoforms act as transcription factors. The DeltaNp63 isoforms lack the main transcription activation domain and act as dominant-negative inhibitors of transactivation (TA) isoforms. To clarify the role of these isoforms and to better understand their functional overlap with p53, we ectopically expressed each p63 isoform in the p53-null hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Hep3B. All TA isoforms, as well as DeltaNp63alpha, had a half-life of <1 h when transiently expressed and were degraded by the proteasome pathway. The most stable form was DeltaNp63gamma, with a half-life of >8 h. As expected, TA isoforms differed in their transcriptional activities toward genes regulated by p53, TAp63gamma being the most active form. In contrast, DeltaNp63 isoforms were transcriptionally inactive on genes studied and inhibited TA isoforms in a dose-dependent manner. When stably expressed in polyclonal cell populations, TAp63beta and gamma isoforms were undetectable. However, when treated with doxorubicin (DOX), p63 proteins rapidly accumulated in the cells. This stabilization was associated with an increase in phosphorylation. Strikingly, in DOX-treated polyclonal populations, increase in TAp63 levels was accompanied by overexpression of DeltaNp73. This observation suggests complex regulatory cross talks between the different isoforms of the p53 family. In conclusion, p63 exhibits several transcriptional and stress-response properties similar to those of p53, suggesting that p63 activities should be taken into consideration in approaches to improve cancer therapies based on genotoxic agents.
    Carcinogenesis 03/2008; 29(2):273-81. · 5.64 Impact Factor
  • European Journal of Cancer 01/2008; 6(9):47-47. · 5.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is highly lethal due to limited curative options. In high-incidence regions, such as parts of Africa and Southeastern Asia, >50% of cases carry an AGG to AGT mutation at codon 249 of the TP53 gene, considered as a 'signature' of mutagenesis by aflatoxins. The protein product, p53ser249, may represent a therapeutic target for HCC. The small molecule p53 reactivation and induction of massive apoptosis (PRIMA)-1 has been shown to induce apoptosis in tumour cells by reactivating the transactivation capacity of some p53 mutants. In this study, we have investigated the cytotoxic effects of PRIMA-1 on HCC cells expressing p53ser249. In p53-null Hep3B cells, over-expression of p53ser249 or p53gln248 by stable transfection increased the cytotoxicity of PRIMA-1 at 50 muM. Furthermore, PRIMA-1 treatment delayed the growth of p53ser249-expressing Hep3B cells xenografted in severe combined immunodeficiency mice. However, PRIMA-1 did not restore wild-type DNA binding and transactivation activities to p53ser249 or to p53gln248 in Hep3B cells. Moreover, in PLC/PRF/5, a HCC cell line constitutively expressing p53ser249, small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing of the mutant increased the cytotoxic effect of PRIMA-1. These apparently contradictory effects can be reconciled by proposing that p53ser249 exerts a gain-of-function effect, which favours the survival of HCC cells. Thus, both inhibition of this effect by PRIMA-1 and removal of the mutant by siRNA can lead to the decrease of survival capacity of HCC cells.
    Carcinogenesis 12/2007; 29(7):1428-34. · 5.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: p63 is a member of the p53 protein family that regulates differentiation and morphogenesis in epithelial tissues and is required for the formation of squamous epithelia. Barrett's mucosa is a glandular metaplasia of the squamous epithelium that develops in the lower esophagus in the context of chronic, gastroesophageal reflux and is considered as a precursor for adenocarcinoma. Normal or squamous cancer esophageal cells were exposed to deoxycholic acid (DCA, 50, 100, or 200 microM) and chenodeoxycholic and taurochenodeoxycholic acid at pH 5. p63 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expressions were studied by Western blot and RT-PCR. DCA exposure at pH 5 led to a spectacular decrease in the levels of all isoforms of the p63 proteins. This decrease was observed within minutes of exposure, with a synergistic effect between DCA and acid. Within the same time frame, levels of p63 mRNA were relatively unaffected, whereas levels of COX-2, a marker of stress responses often induced in Barrett's mucosa, were increased. Similar results were obtained with chenodeoxycholic acid but not its taurine conjugate at pH 5. Proteasome inhibition by lactacystin or MG-132 partially blocked the decrease in p63, suggesting a posttranslational degradation mechanism. These results show that combined exposure to bile salt and acid downregulates a critical regulator of squamous differentiation, providing a mechanism to explain the replacement of squamous epithelium by a glandular metaplasia upon exposure of the lower esophagus to gastric reflux.
    AJP Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology 08/2007; 293(1):G45-53. · 3.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is thought to exert antiapoptotic effects in cancer. Here we show that the tumor suppressor p53 upregulated Cox-2 in esophageal and colon cancer cell lines by inducing the binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) to its response element in the COX-2 promoter. Inhibition of NF-kappaB prevented p53 induction of Cox-2 expression. Cooperation between p53 and NF-kappaB was required for activation of COX-2 promoter in response to daunomycin, a DNA-damaging agent. Pharmacological inhibition of Cox-2 enhanced apoptosis in response to daunomycin, in particular in cells containing active p53. In esophageal cancer, there was a correlation between Cox-2 expression and wild-type TP53 in Barrett's esophagus (BE) and in adenocarcinoma, but not in squamous cell carcinoma (P<0.01). These results suggest that p53 and NF-kappaB cooperate in upregulating Cox-2 expression, promoting cell survival in inflammatory precursor lesions such as BE.
    Oncogene 10/2006; 25(42):5708-18. · 8.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The E6 and E7 of the cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) type 38 immortalize primary human keratinocytes, an event normally associated with the inactivation of pathways controlled by the tumour suppressor p53. Here, we show for the first time that HPV38 alters p53 functions. Expression of HPV38 E6 and E7 in human keratinocytes or in the skin of transgenic mice induces stabilization of wild-type p53. This selectively activates the transcription of deltaNp73, an isoform of the p53-related protein p73, which in turn inhibits the capacity of p53 to induce the transcription of genes involved in growth suppression and apoptosis. DeltaNp73 downregulation by an antisense oligonucleotide leads to transcriptional re-activation of p53-regulated genes and apoptosis. Our findings illustrate a novel mechanism of the alteration of p53 function that is mediated by a cutaneous HPV type and support the role of HPV38 and deltaNp73 in human carcinogenesis.
    EMBO Reports 04/2006; 7(3):334-40. · 7.19 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

224 Citations
74.71 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009
    • Hospices Civils de Lyon
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • 2007
    • CHU de Lyon - Groupement Hospitalier Edouard Herriot
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • 2006
    • University of Liège
      Luik, Walloon Region, Belgium
    • International Agency for Research on Cancer
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France