T A Sanborn

NorthShore University HealthSystem, Chicago, Illinois, United States

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Publications (142)947.18 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: To assess the relationship of femoral vascular closure device (VCD) use to bleeding and ischemic events in patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) via different anticoagulation strategies.Background: It is unknown whether femoral VCD reduce major bleeding after primary PCI for STEMI using bivalirudin anticoagulation.Methods: We compared VCD-treated patients with propensity-matched controls in the HORIZONS-AMI trial with respect to net adverse clinical events (NACE), defined as the composite of major bleeding unrelated to coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) and major adverse cardiac events (comprised of death, reinfarction, ischemia-driven target vessel revascularization and stroke), at 30 days and 1 year.Results: Among 3,602 patients enrolled in HORIZONS-AMI, 2,948 underwent primary PCI via femoral arterial access and 896 (30%) received VCDs, of whom 642 were included in our model along with 642 propensity-matched controls. At 30 days, VCD-treated patients had significantly less NACE (6.7% vs. 10.8%, HR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.42-0.89, p=0.009), driven by a lower rate of non-CABG related major bleeding (5.0% vs. 8.1%, HR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.39-0.94, p=0.02). Bleeding reduction was maintained at one year and consistent in magnitude regardless of randomization to bivalirudin or unfractionated heparin plus a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor (p for interaction = 0.84).Conclusion: In patients undergoing transfemoral primary PCI for STEMI, VCD use was associated with significantly lower non-CABG major bleeding irrespective of anticoagulation strategy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 09/2014; · 2.51 Impact Factor
  • Timothy A Sanborn
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    ABSTRACT: No abstract available.
    Cardiology 11/2010; 117(3):174-5. · 1.52 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Jamil B Dihu, Amar R Chadaga, Timothy A Sanborn
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    ABSTRACT: Vascular closure devices (VCDs) were initially developed to improve access site hemostasis and allow for earlier ambulation in patients undergoing diagnostic catheterization and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Though initially thought to be beneficial, large meta-analysis has shown conflicting data regarding whether VCDs alter access site bleeding in a variety of clinical settings. One area of particular interest for the adoption of VCDs has been in the setting of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in which multiple antiplatelet strategies are often employed leading to a high risk of bleeding. Bleeding in ACS has been shown to be a powerful independent predictor of 30-day mortality. Recently, investigators have reported that VCDs reduce access site bleeding in the setting of ACS. In our review, we use several selected representative clinical trials to provide a historical account for the use of VCDs. We also provide for a review of data as it relates to access site bleeding in ACS along with analysis showing that VCDs may potentially provide for reductions in bleeding and vascular complications in patients with ACS undergoing PCI.
    Cardiovascular Therapeutics 11/2010; 30(3):e136-9. · 2.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Acute Catheterization and Urgent Intervention Triage Strategy (ACUITY) trial demonstrated that bivalirudin monotherapy significantly reduces major bleeding compared with heparin (unfractionated or enoxaparin) or bivalirudin plus a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor in acute coronary syndromes. Whether vascular closure devices (VCD) impact these results is unknown. Therefore, this study sought to determine whether VCD impact major access site bleeding (ASB) in patients with acute coronary syndromes undergoing early invasive management by the femoral approach. Major ASB in ACUITY was defined as ASB requiring interventional or surgical correction, hematoma > or =5 cm at the access site, retroperitoneal bleeding, or hemoglobin drop > or =3 g/dL with ecchymosis or hematoma <5 cm, oozing blood, or prolonged bleeding (>30 minutes) at the access site. Stepwise logistical regression was performed to identify the independent determinants of ASB. Of 11 621 patients undergoing angiography with or without percutaneous coronary intervention by the femoral approach, 4307 (37.1%) received a VCD and 7314 (62.9%) did not. Rates of major ASB were lower with VCD compared with no VCD (2.5% versus 3.3%, relative risk, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.94; P=0.01) and were lowest in patients treated with bivalirudin monotherapy and a VCD (0.7%). Stepwise logistic regression revealed that a VCD (odds ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.99; P=0.04) and bivalirudin monotherapy (odds ratio, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.49; P<0.0001) were both independent determinates of freedom from major ASB. In patients with acute coronary syndromes undergoing an early invasive management strategy by the femoral approach, the use of a VCD, bivalirudin monotherapy, or both minimizes rates of major ASB. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique Identifier: NCT00093158.
    Circulation Cardiovascular Interventions 02/2010; 3(1):57-62. · 6.54 Impact Factor
  • Timothy A Sanborn
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    ABSTRACT: A number of bifurcation lesion classification schemes exist in which capital letters or Roman numerals categorize various types of bifurcation lesions. Unfortunately, these classification schemes are confusing and difficult to remember because of the lack of association between the numbers or letters and various anatomic abnormalities of bifurcation lesions. Recently, the Medina classification was proposed as a simpler, easier-to-remember scheme that labels bifurcation lesions by plaque involvement in 3 anatomic segments (proximal main segment, distal segment of main branch, and side branch). However, this classification also has limitations because it doesn't include important descriptive features of bifurcation lesions that could be important in determining optimum stent treatment strategy. The Movahed classification overcomes these limitations by including bifurcation angle and proximal vessel size in its scheme. The impact of these various classification schemes on stent treatment strategies and more recent clinical trial results is discussed.
    Reviews in cardiovascular medicine 01/2010; 11 Suppl 1:S11-6. · 0.58 Impact Factor
  • Timothy A Sanborn
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 09/2009; 75(2):303-4. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cognitive decline after open-heart surgery has been the subject of a number of conflicting reports in recent years. Determination of possible cognitive impairment due to surgery or use of cardiopulmonary bypass is complicated by numerous factors, including use of appropriate comparison groups and consideration of practice effects in cognitive testing. Neuropsychological data were gathered from 46 healthy controls, 42 cardiac patients referred for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and 43 cardiac patients referred for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Fourteen cognitive function tests were utilized at baseline and at three time points after surgery (3 weeks, 4 months, 1 year). Measures showing acceptable test-retest reliability based on intraclass correlations were compared using regression-based reliable change indices. No clear pattern of group differences or change at follow-up emerged. A greater percentage of CABG patients than controls worsened in seven tests (three at 1 year), but a greater percentage of PCI patients than controls also worsened in seven tests (three at 1 year). Generalized estimating equations showed only two tests (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Third Edition, Digit Symbol, and Hopkins Verbal Learning Test, Revised, Total Recall) to be significantly different between groups from baseline to 1 year. Interestingly, compared with healthy controls, more PCI patients than CABG patients worsened in the former of those two tests, whereas more PCI and CABG patients improved on the latter. Using healthy controls and a relevant nonsurgical comparison group to contend with important methodological considerations, current CABG procedure does not appear to create cognitive decline.
    The Annals of thoracic surgery 06/2008; 85(5):1571-8. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Little data exists regarding the relationship between the volume of radiographic contrast infused and the risk of contrast nephropathy for individual patients based on specific patient characteristics. Because the likelihood of renal failure is increased when there is preexisting azotemia or when larger volumes of contrast are used, it was hypothesized that the contrast volume:estimated creatinine clearance ratio would serve as a predictor of nephropathy following cardiac angiography. A retrospective analysis was performed of 152 high risk patients whose baseline serum creatinine concentration was >2.0 mg/dL or who received ± 300 ce of contrast. Nephropathy, defined as in increase in serum creatinine of > 1.0 mg/dL within 48 hours, occurred in 11 patients (7%). The contrast volume: creatinine clearance ratio was > 6.0 in 64% of patients who developed nephropathy and 31% of patients who did not (P < 0.05). The contrast volume:creatinine clearance ratio was then studied prospectively in 250 consecutive patients. The risk of nephropathy was 61% for patients with a ratio > 6.0, but only 1% otherwise (P < 0.01). This ratio can be used to calculate an upper limit for contrast volume and might reduce the chance of renal failure.
    Journal of Interventional Cardiology 06/2007; 10(2):113 - 119. · 1.50 Impact Factor
  • Timothy A Sanborn
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    ABSTRACT: Vascular closure devices have demonstrated their ability to reduce hemostasis and ambulation times, as well as improve patient comfort, without increasing vascular complications in their initial industry-sponsored, randomized clinical trials. However, in the early years of first-generation closure devices, there was an initial concern about the risk of higher complication rates. As devices have improved, it appears that there may now be a trend towards reduced vascular complications compared with manual compression, especially in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions.
    Future Cardiology 11/2006; 2(6):655-8.
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    ABSTRACT: In patients with cardiogenic shock (CS) complicating acute myocardial infarction, echocardiographic and angiographic findings are used to aid diagnosis, determine prognosis, and guide management. The purpose of this analysis from the Should we emergently revascularize Occluded Coronary arteries for Cardiogenic ShocK (SHOCK) trial is to identify relations between the angiographic and echocardiographic features of patients with CS. Such an analysis of the correlations between echocardiographic and angiographic findings in patients with CS may provide insights into the etiology and treatment of CS. In 302 randomized patients, an echocardiogram and an angiogram before revascularization were available in 127 patients. Although the median ejection fraction derived by echocardiography and left ventricular angiography was identical (30%), the positive correlation was weak (R2 = 0.209, p = 0.019). Patients with a larger number of diseased vessels had worse mitral regurgitation (MR) by echocardiography (p = 0.005). There was a significant but weak association between left ventricular angiographic MR grade and echocardiographic MR severity (R2 = 0.162, p = 0.015), but there was no association between culprit vessel and degree of MR. In conclusion, worse coronary artery disease is associated with more severe MR. Echocardiography and angiography are valuable and result in similar estimated ejection fractions in a large cohort, but there is wide variation between the techniques in patients.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 11/2006; 98(8):1004-8. · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cognitive decline has been associated with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), but the extent to which these findings are related to the natural history of cognitive deficits in elderly patients with cardiac disease or have been influenced by the research methods used to determine abnormalities warrants further study. After excluding individuals with conditions known to cause brain dysfunction, individuals referred for percutaneous coronary intervention (n = 42) or CABG (n = 35) were compared with an age-matched and education-matched control group without clinical evidence of coronary artery disease (n = 44). These subjects underwent a battery of 14 neurocognitive tests at baseline (preoperatively) and at 3 weeks and 4 months postoperatively. The majority of test scores for all three cohorts were within nonimpaired ranges at baseline and 3 weeks later. Change in impairment status from baseline to 3-week assessment was not associated statistically with type of treatment as referenced to clinical norms, and was associated with type of treatment on only one measure as referenced to control group performances. A further overall improvement in impairment status from 3 weeks' to 4 months' follow-up was seen in both CABG and percutaneous coronary intervention patients. Mean test scores were significantly worse in CABG patients versus percutaneous coronary intervention patients in 4 of 13 measures at 3 weeks' follow-up, but significant de novo impairment at 3 weeks' follow-up in the CABG group compared with the percutaneous coronary intervention and control groups was present in only one test. As assessed by reliable change methodology, impairment was statistically associated with type of treatment for only 1 of 13 measures. As compared with changes seen in repeat testing of healthy control subjects and individuals who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention, clinically meaningful cognitive deterioration was not observed after CABG.
    The Annals of thoracic surgery 09/2006; 82(2):597-607. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Little has been reported regarding the utility or outcomes of femoral venous vascular closure using arterial suture closure devices. We describe results using a pre-closure approach with a 6 French (Fr) Perclose Closer S device in patients who underwent antegrade aortic valvuloplasty using 14 Fr percutaneous femoral venous access catheters. Forty-five patients underwent antegrade aortic valvuloplasty and suture-mediated closure with a 6 Fr Perclose device. A 6 Fr Closer S suture device was preloaded into the femoral vein after 6 Fr sheath access, prior to insertion of a 14 Fr venous sheath. Upon completion of the procedure, the 14 Fr femoral venous sheath was removed through the existing sutures. Of 45 patients (mean age 82.4 years; 17 males), immediate hemostasis was achieved with percutaneous suture closure in 43 (95.6%). Only 2 failures occurred which were subsequently successfully treated with manual compression. No late access site bleeding occurred from sutured sites. In all other patients, hemostasis using a 6 Fr Perclose suture-mediated device was successful and immediate. There was no need for transfusion, no clinical venous thrombosis, and no infections occurred at the access site. Two hospital deaths were documented from causes unrelated to suture-mediated closure. In conjunction with 14-Fr size percutaneous sheaths during antegrade aortic valvuloplasty, percutaneous suturemediated closure is a highly effective method for achieving hemostasis. This has simplified postprocedural management in terms of early mobilization and diminished late access site bleeding.
    The Journal of invasive cardiology 08/2006; 18(7):299-302. · 1.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Early studies suggested that morbidity and mortality after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were greater for women than men. However, in recent reports, sex-related differences in short-term outcome have decreased as outcomes among women have improved. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of sex on long-term mortality among a large cohort of patients undergoing PCI in the contemporary era. Three hospitals in New York City contributed prospectively defined data elements on 4284 consecutive patients undergoing PCI in 1998 to 1999. All-cause mortality at a mean follow-up of 3 years was the primary end point. Of the 4284 patients, 1331 (31%) were women. Women were significantly older than men (mean age 67 vs 62 years, P < .001) and less often white (72% vs 80%, P < .001). Hypertension (78% vs 66%, P < .001) and diabetes (36% vs 22%, P < .001) were more prevalent in women. Prior cardiac surgery (14% vs 19%, P = .001) and previous myocardial infarction (MI) (33% vs 36%, P = .08) were less common among women. Presentation with unstable angina was more frequent in women (45% vs 41%, P = .034), whereas presentation with acute MI did not differ by sex. Congestive heart failure developed more commonly among women (7.1% vs 4.1%, P < .001). The extent of coronary disease (1-, 2-, or 3-vessel disease) did not differ between women and men. Mean ejection fraction was 52% in women and 50% in men (P < .001). Stents were placed in 77% of both groups. Procedural success was 97% for both women and men. Inhospital adverse outcomes including death, post-PCI MI, emergency bypass surgery, abrupt closure, and stent thrombosis were uncommon and not different between groups. Mortality at 3 years was 10% for women and 8.9% for men (P = .197). However, using Cox proportional hazards analysis to adjust for comorbidities and possible confounders, female sex was associated with a significant independent reduction in the hazard of long-term mortality (hazard ratio 0.78, 95% CI 0.620-0.969, P = .02). Despite more high-risk characteristics, female sex conferred a long-term survival advantage after PCI.
    American heart journal 06/2006; 151(5):1026-31. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mechanical closure of percutaneous femoral arteriotomies following catheter based procedures remains problematic. The EVS closure device is the first to utilize a staple to effect arteriotomy closure and was compared to manual compression following sheath removal in a 362 patient randomized (2:1 to device) multicenter trial. As pre-specified, one half of the patients underwent coronary intervention. Time to hemostasis was significantly reduced in the EVS group for both diagnostic (3.3 +/- 2.6 vs. 19.3 +/- 5.7 minutes; p < 0.001) and interventional procedures (5.5 +/- 5.1 vs. 22.3 +/- 9.9 minutes; p < 0.0001). Time to ambulation was similarly reduced in the EVS group following diagnostic (2.4 +/- 3.3 vs. 6.0 +/- 5.2 hours; p < 0.001) and interventional procedures (3.4 +/- 4.5 vs. 7.6 +/- 7.0 hours; p < 0.001). The incidence of major complications was similar between the EVS and manual compression groups at discharge (0.4% vs. 1.7%; p = NS) and at 30 day follow-up (0.4% vs. 2.5%; p = NS). Compared to manual compression, the EVS device provides a safe and effective method of femoral artery closure.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 04/2006; 67(4):546-53. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study sought to evaluate the clinical results of a percutaneous approach to mitral valve repair for mitral regurgitation (MR). A surgical technique approximating the middle scallops of the mitral leaflets to create a double orifice with improved leaflet coaptation was introduced in the early 1990s. Recently, a percutaneous method to create the same type of repair was developed. A trans-septal approach was used to deliver a clip device that grasps the mitral leaflet edges to create the double orifice. General anesthesia, fluoroscopy, and echocardiographic guidance are used. A 24-F guide is positioned in the left atrium. The clip is centered over the mitral orifice, passed into the left ventricle, and pulled back to grasp the mitral leaflets. After verification that MR is reduced, the clip is released. Twenty-seven patients had six-month follow-up. Clips were implanted in 24 patients. There were no procedural complications and four 30-day major adverse events: partial clip detachment in three patients, who underwent elective valve surgery, and one patient with post-procedure stroke that resolved at one month. Three additional patients had surgery for unresolved MR, leaving 18 patients free from surgery. In 13 of 14 patients with reduction of MR to < or =2+ after one month, the reduction was maintained at six months. Percutaneous edge-to-edge mitral valve repair can be performed safely and a reduction in MR can be achieved in a significant proportion of patients to six months. Patients who required subsequent surgery had elective mitral valve repair or intended replacement.
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology 12/2005; 46(11):2134-40. · 14.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cognitive deficits have been reported to occur in a significant proportion of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), but the extent to which these deficits were preexistent or related to the natural history of cognitive decline in this patient population remains poorly defined. After excluding patients with conditions known to cause brain dysfunction (eg, hepatic dysfunction, stroke), a group of patients referred for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or CABG (n = 82) was compared with an age- and education-matched control group that did not have clinical evidence of coronary artery disease (n = 41). These subjects underwent a battery of neurocognitive and emotional testing. Test score means for 5 of 14 different measures were significantly greater (impaired) in cardiac compared with control group subjects. Of cardiac subjects, 20% demonstrated clinical impairment (test result > or = 1 SD worse than mean for normative standards) in 6 of 14 tests, compared with 10% of the controls. By clinical standards, 46% of cardiac subjects would be considered to be impaired (score 1 SD or more below the control group mean) on 3 or more neuropsychologic measures, compared with 29% of the controls. By this (control group mean) standard, cardiac subjects demonstrated impaired scores on 3.06 +/- 2.6 tests compared with impairment in 2.0 +/- 2.35 tests for the control group (p = 0.01). Even excluding patients at high risk for brain dysfunction, cognitive impairment is found in patients with coronary artery disease before interventional therapy. Baseline impairment must be considered when evaluating outcomes after intervention.
    The Annals of thoracic surgery 10/2005; 80(4):1327-34; discussion 1334-5. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Should We Emergently Revascularize Occluded Coronaries for Cardiogenic Shock (SHOCK) trial demonstrated the survival advantage of emergency revascularization versus initial medical stabilization in patients developing cardiogenic shock after acute myocardial infarction. The relative merits of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) versus percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with shock have not been defined. The objective of this analysis was to compare the effects of PCI and CABG on 30-day and 1-year survival in the SHOCK trial. Of the 302 trial patients, 128 with predominant left ventricular failure had emergency revascularization. The selection of revascularization procedures was individualized. Eighty-one patients (63.3%) had PCI, and 47 (36.7%) had CABG. The median time from randomization to intervention was 0.9 hours (interquartile range [IQR], 0.3 to 2.2 hours) for PCI and 2.7 hours (IQR, 1.3 to 5.5 hours) for CABG. Baseline demographics and hemodynamics were similar, except that there were more diabetics (48.9% versus 26.9%; P=0.02), 3-vessel disease (80.4% versus 60.3%; P=0.03), and left main coronary disease (41.3% versus 13.0%; P=0.001) in the CABG group. In the PCI group, 12.3% had 2-vessel and 2.5% had 3-vessel interventions. In the CABG group, 84.8% received > or =2 grafts, 52.2% received > or =3 grafts, and 87.2% were deemed completely revascularized. The survival rates were 55.6% in the PCI group compared with 57.4% in the CABG group at 30 days (P=0.86) and 51.9% compared with 46.8%, respectively, at 1 year (P=0.71). Among SHOCK trial patients randomized to emergency revascularization, those treated with CABG had a greater prevalence of diabetes and worse coronary disease than those treated with PCI. However, survival rates were similar. Emergency CABG is an important component of an optimal treatment strategy in patients with cardiogenic shock, and should be considered a complementary treatment option in patients with extensive coronary disease.
    Circulation 09/2005; 112(13):1992-2001. · 15.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the SHOCK trial, the group of patients aged >or=75 years did not appear to derive the mortality benefit from early revascularization (ERV) versus initial medical stabilization (IMS) that was seen in patients aged <75 years. We sought to determine the reason for this finding by examining the baseline characteristics and outcomes of the 2 treatment groups by age. Patients with cardiogenic shock (CS) secondary to left ventricular (LV) failure were randomized to ERV within 6 hours or to a period of IMS. We compared the characteristics by treatment group of patients aged >or=75 years and of their younger counterparts. Of the 56 enrolled patients aged >or=75 years, those assigned to ERV had lower LV ejection fraction at baseline than IMS-assigned patients (27.5% +/- 12.7% vs 35.6% +/- 11.6%, P = .051). In the elderly ERV and IMS groups, 54.2% and 31.3%, respectively, were women ( P = .105) and 62.5% and 40.6%, respectively, had an anterior infarction (P = .177). The 30-day mortality rate in the ERV group was 75.0% in patients aged >or=75 years and 41.4% in those aged <75 years. In the IMS group, 30-day mortality was 53.1% for those aged >or=75 years, similar to the 56.8% for patients aged <75 years. Overall, the elderly randomized to ERV did not have better survival than elderly IMS patients. Despite the strong association of age and death post-CS, elderly patients assigned to IMS had a 30-day mortality rate similar to that of IMS patients aged <75 years, suggesting that this was a lower-risk group with more favorable baseline characteristics. The lack of apparent benefit from ERV in elderly patients in the SHOCK trial may thus be due to differences in important baseline characteristics, specifically LV function, and play of chance arising from the small sample size. Therefore, the SHOCK trial overall finding of a 12-month survival benefit for ERV should be viewed as applicable to all patients, including those >or=75 years of age, with acute myocardial infarction complicated by CS.
    American heart journal 06/2005; 149(6):1128-34. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Percutaneous coronary rotational atherectomy (PCRA) is a potent stimulus of platelet activation and aggregation in vivo. For this reason, many patients undergoing PCRA are treated with platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa inhibitors. However, there is limited data regarding the ability of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors to reduce ischemic complications of PCRA and no data regarding their effect on long-term survival. Data on 1138 consecutive patients undergoing PCRA in 5 hospitals in 1998-1999 were pooled and analyzed. Long-term survival was available for all 530 patients treated in 3 of the hospitals. GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors were administered to 315 of 1138 (28%) PCRA patients. There was no difference in age, gender or race among patients treated with and without GP IIb/IIIa antagonists. The prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, renal insufficiency and peripheral vascular disease did not differ between groups. Unstable angina was more common among patients treated with GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors (45% vs. 38%, P = 0.036) Patients treated with GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors had lower ejection fractions (50% vs. 55%, P < 0.001) and more 3-vessel coronary disease (24% vs. 16%, P = 0.002). Angiographic success was over 99% in both groups (P = NS). The frequency of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) was slightly greater in GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor treated patients (3.8% vs. 2.2%, P = 0.126). At a mean follow-up of 3 years, mortality was 13.3% in the GP IIb/IIIa treated patients and 12% in the untreated patients (P = 0.224). On Cox proportional hazards analysis, treatment with a GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor was not significantly associated with increased survival (Hazard Ratio, 0.81, 95% Confidence Interval, 0.631-1.039, P = 0.098). These data do not indicate a significant association between GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor treatment during PCRA and MACE or survival. There is limited data regarding the ability of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors to reduce ischemic complications of percutaneous coronary rotational atherectomy (PCRA) and no data regarding their effect on long-term survival. These data do not indicate a significant association between GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor treatment during PCRA and MACE or survival.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 02/2005; 19(1):47-54. · 1.99 Impact Factor
  • Ted E. Feldman, Timothy A. Sanborn, William W. O’Neill
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    ABSTRACT: Valve replacement for aortic valve stenosis has been the gold standard of therapy for decades. The prognosis of symptomatic severe aortic stenosis is well known, with very high annual mortality and a clearly limited life-span. Surgical aortic valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis, bioprosthetic, or homograft valve prolongs life in this patient cohort.
    12/2004: pages 29-48;

Publication Stats

5k Citations
947.18 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2014
    • NorthShore University HealthSystem
      • Division of Cardiology
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 1996–2007
    • Cornell University
      • Department of Medicine
      Ithaca, NY, United States
    • Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc
      Bruxelles, Brussels Capital Region, Belgium
  • 2006
    • University of Illinois at Chicago
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
    • Stony Brook University
      Stony Brook, New York, United States
    • Stony Brook University Hospital
      Stony Brook, New York, United States
  • 2004–2006
    • Northwestern University
      • Division of Cardiology (Dept. of Medicine)
      Evanston, IL, United States
  • 2005
    • University of Toronto
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2004–2005
    • Beth Israel Medical Center
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2003–2005
    • Southern Illinois Healthcare
      Illinois, United States
    • Auckland City Hospital
      Окленд, Auckland, New Zealand
    • Rush University Medical Center
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
    • Gracie Square Hospital, New York, NY
      New York City, New York, United States
    • Albert Einstein College of Medicine
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2001–2003
    • St. Paul's Hospital
      Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
  • 1999–2003
    • New York Presbyterian Hospital
      • • Department of Cardiology
      • • Department of Pain Medicine
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1999–2001
    • Saint Luke's Hospital (NY, USA)
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1999–2000
    • Weill Cornell Medical College
      • Division of Cardiology
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1993
    • Harvard Medical School
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, MA, United States
    • New York Medical College
      • Department of Medicine
      New York City, NY, United States
  • 1992–1993
    • Brigham and Women's Hospital
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 1988–1992
    • Mount Sinai Medical Center
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1984–1990
    • Boston Medical Center
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1985
    • University of Massachusetts Boston
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States