Yuhong Tang

The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, Oklahoma, United States

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Publications (63)367.57 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Class I KNOTTED-like homeobox (KNOXI) genes are critical for the maintenance of the shoot apical meristem. The expression domain of KNOXI is regulated by ASYMMETRIC LEAVES1/ROUGHSHEATH2/PHANTASTICA (ARP) genes, which are associated with leaf morphology. In the inverted repeat-lacking clade (IRLC) of Fabaceae, the orthologs of LEAFY (LFY) function in place of KNOXI to regulate compound leaf development. Here, we characterized loss-of-function mutants of ARP (PHAN) and SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM)- and BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP)-like KNOXI in the model IRLC legume species Medicago truncatula. The function of ARP genes is species specific. The repression of STM/BP-like KNOXI genes in leaves is not mediated by PHAN, and no suppression of PHAN by STM/BP-like KNOXI genes was observed either, indicating that STM/BP-like KNOXI genes are uncoupled from PHAN in M. truncatula. Furthermore, comparative analyses of phenotypic output in response to ectopic expression of KNOXI and the M. truncatula LFY ortholog, SINGLE LEAFLET1 (SGL1), reveal that KNOXI and SGL1 regulate parallel pathways in leaf development. We propose that SGL1 probably functions in a stage-specific manner in the regulation of the indeterminate state of developing leaves in M. truncatula.
    The Plant Cell 04/2014; · 9.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Medicago truncatula is a model legume forage crop native to the arid and semi-arid environments of the Mediterranean. Given its drought-adapted nature, it is an ideal candidate to study the molecular and biochemical mechanisms conferring drought resistance in plants. Medicago plants were subjected to a progressive drought stress over 14 days of water withholding followed by re-watering under controlled environmental conditions. Based on physiological measurements of plant water status and changes in morphology, plants experienced mild, moderate and severe water stress before re-hydration. Transcriptome analysis of roots and shoots from control, mildly-, moderately- and severely-stressed, and re-watered plants, identified many thousands of genes that were altered in expression in response to drought. Many genes with expression tightly coupled to the plant water potential (i.e. drought intensity) were identified suggesting an involvement in Medicago drought-adaptation responses. Metabolite profiling of drought-stressed plants revealed the presence of 135 polar and 165 non-polar compounds in roots and shoots. Combining Medicago metabolomic data with transcriptomic data yielded insight into the regulation of metabolic pathways operating under drought stress. Amongst the metabolites detected in drought-stressed Medicago plants, myo-inositol and proline had striking regulatory profiles indicating involvement in Medicago drought tolerance.
    Plant Cell and Environment 03/2014; · 5.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Medicago truncatula WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) gene, STENOFOLIA (STF), plays a key role in leaf blade outgrowth by promoting cell proliferation at the adaxial-abaxial junction. STF functions primarily as a transcriptional repressor, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unknown. Here, we report the identification of a protein interaction partner and a direct target, shedding light on the mechanism of STF function. Two highly conserved motifs in the C-terminal domain of STF, the WUSCHEL (WUS) box and the STF box, cooperatively recruit TOPLESS (Mt-TPL) family corepressors, and this recruitment is required for STF function, as deletion of these two domains (STFdel) impaired blade outgrowth whereas fusing Mt-TPL to STFdel restored function. The homeodomain motif is required for direct repression of ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2 (Mt-AS2), silencing of which partially rescues the stf mutant phenotype. STF and LAMINALESS1 (LAM1) are functional orthologs. A single amino acid (Asn to Ile) substitution in the homeodomain abolished the repression of Mt-AS2 and STF's ability to complement the lam1 mutant of Nicotiana sylvestris. Our data together support a model in which STF recruits corepressors to transcriptionally repress its targets during leaf blade morphogenesis. We propose that recruitment of TPL/TPL-related proteins may be a common mechanism in the repressive function of modern/WUS clade WOX genes.
    The Plant Cell 02/2014; · 9.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Understanding the molecular processes affecting cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fiber development is important for developing tools aimed at improving fiber quality. Short fiber cotton mutants Ligon-lintless 1 (Li1) and Ligon-lintless 2 (Li2) are naturally occurring, monogenic mutations residing on different chromosomes. Both mutations cause early cessation in fiber elongation. These two mutants serve as excellent model systems to elucidate molecular mechanisms relevant to fiber length development. Previous studies of these mutants using transcriptome analysis by our laboratory and others had been limited by the fact that very large numbers of genes showed altered expression patterns in the mutants, making a targeted analysis difficult or impossible. In this research, a comparative microarray analysis was conducted using these two short fiber mutants and their near isogenic wild type (WT) grown under both field and greenhouse environments in order to identify key genes or metabolic pathways common to fiber elongation. Analyses of three transcriptome profiles obtained from different growth conditions and mutant types showed that most differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were affected by growth conditions. Under field conditions, short fiber mutants commanded higher expression of genes related to energy production, manifested by the increasing of mitochondrial electron transport activity or responding to reactive oxygen species when compared to the WT. Eighty-eight DEGs were identified to have altered expression patterns common to both short fiber mutants regardless of growth conditions. Enrichment, pathway and expression analyses suggested that these 88 genes were likely involved in fiber elongation without being affected by growth conditions.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(4):e95554. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Leaf shape elaboration and organ separation are critical for plant morphogenesis. We characterized the developmental roles of LOBED LEAFLET1 by analyzing a recessive mutant in the model legume Medicago truncatula. An ortholog of Arabidopsis thaliana ARGONAUTE7 (AGO7), Mt-AGO7/LOBED LEAFLET1, is required for the biogenesis of a trans-acting short interfering RNA (ta-siRNA) to negatively regulate the expression of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTORs in M. truncatula. Loss of function in AGO7 results in pleiotropic phenotypes in different organs. The prominent phenotype of the ago7 mutant is lobed leaf margins and more widely spaced lateral organs, suggesting that the trans-acting siRNA3 (TAS3) pathway negatively regulates the formation of boundaries and the separation of lateral organs in M. truncatula. Genetic interaction analysis with the smooth leaf margin1 (slm1) mutant revealed that leaf margin formation is cooperatively regulated by the auxin/SLM1 (ortholog of Arabidopsis PIN-FORMED1) module, which influences the initiation of leaf margin teeth, and the TAS3 ta-siRNA pathway, which determines the degree of margin indentation. Further investigations showed that the TAS3 ta-siRNA pathway and NO APICAL MERISTEM (ortholog of Arabidopsis CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON) antagonistically regulate both leaf margin development and lateral organ separation, and the regulation is partially dependent on the auxin/SLM1 module.
    The Plant Cell 12/2013; · 9.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cotton fiber maturity is an important factor for determining the commercial value of cotton. How fiber cell wall development affects fiber maturity is not well understood. A comparison of fiber cross-sections showed that an immature fiber (im) mutant had lower fiber maturity than its near isogenic wild type, Texas marker-1 (TM-1). The availability of the im mutant and TM-1 provides a unique way to determine molecular mechanisms regulating cotton fiber maturity. Transcriptome analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the im mutant fibers grown under normal stress conditions were similar to those in wild type cotton fibers grown under severe stress conditions. The majority of these DEGs in the im mutant were related to stress responses and cellular respiration. Stress is known to reduce the activity of a classical respiration pathway responsible for energy production and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Both energy productions and ROS levels in the im mutant fibers are expected to be reduced if the im mutant is associated with stress responses. In accord with the prediction, the transcriptome profiles of the im mutant showed the same alteration of transcriptional regulation that happened in energy deprived plants in which expressions of genes associated with cell growth processes were reduced whereas expressions of genes associated with recycling and transporting processes were elevated. We confirmed that ROS production in developing fibers from the im mutant was lower than that from the wild type. The lower production of ROS in the im mutant fibers might result from the elevated levels of alternative respiration induced by stress. The low degree of fiber cell wall thickness of the im mutant fibers is associated with deregulation of the genes involved in stress responses and cellular respiration. The reduction of ROS levels and up-regulation of the genes involved in alternative respirations suggest that energy deprivation may occur in the im mutant fibers.
    BMC Genomics 12/2013; 14(1):889. · 4.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It is necessary to overcome recalcitrance of the biomass to saccharification (sugar release) to make switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) economically viable as a feedstock for liquid biofuels. Lignin content correlates negatively with sugar release efficiency in switchgrass, but selecting the right gene candidates for engineering lignin biosynthesis in this tetraploid outcrossing species is not straightforward. To assist this endeavor, we have used an inducible switchgrass cell suspension system for studying lignin biosynthesis in response to exogenous brassinolide. By applying a combination of protein sequence phylogeny with whole-genome microarray analyses of induced cell cultures and developing stem internode sections, we have generated a list of candidate monolignol biosynthetic genes for switchgrass. Several genes that were strongly supported through our bioinformatics analysis as involved in lignin biosynthesis were confirmed by gene silencing studies, in which lignin levels were reduced as a result of targeting a single gene. However, candidate genes encoding enzymes involved in the early steps of the currently accepted monolignol biosynthesis pathway in dicots may have functionally redundant paralogues in switchgrass and therefore require further evaluation. This work provides a blueprint and resources for the systematic genome-wide study of the monolignol pathway in switchgrass, as well as other C4 monocot species.
    The Plant Cell 11/2013; · 9.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Global warming predictions indicate that temperatures will increase by another 2-6[degree sign]C by the end of this century. High temperature is a major abiotic stress limiting plant growth and productivity in many areas of the world. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a model herbaceous bioenergy crop, due to its rapid growth rate, reliable biomass yield, minimal requirements of water and nutrients, adaptability to grow on marginal lands and widespread distribution throughout North America. The effect of high temperature on switchgrass physiology, cell wall composition and biomass yields has been reported. However, there is void in the knowledge of the molecular responses to heat stress in switchgrass. We conducted long-term heat stress treatment (38o/30[degree sign]C, day/night, for 50 days) in the switchgrass cultivar Alamo. A significant decrease in the plant height and total biomass was evident in the heat stressed plants compared to controls. Total RNA from control and heat stress samples were used for transcriptome analysis with switchgrass Affymetrix genechips. Following normalization and pre-processing, 5365 probesets were identified as differentially expressed using a 2-fold cutoff. Of these, 2233 probesets (2000 switchgrass unigenes) were up-regulated, and 3132 probesets (2809 unigenes) were down-regulated. Differential expression of 42 randomly selected genes from this list was validated using RT-PCR. Rice orthologs were retrieved for 78.7% of the heat stress responsive switchgrass probesets. Gene ontology (GOs) enrichment analysis using AgriGO program showed that genes related to ATPase regulator, chaperone binding, and protein folding was significantly up-regulated. GOs associated with protein modification, transcription, phosphorus and nitrogen metabolic processes, were significantly down-regulated by heat stress. Plausible connections were identified between the identified GOs, physiological responses and heat response phenotype observed in switchgrass plants. Comparative transcriptome analysis in response to heat stress among four monocots -- switchgrass, rice, wheat and maize identified 16 common genes, most of which were associated with protein refolding processes. These core genes will be valuable biomarkers for identifying heat sensitive plant germplasm since they are responsive to both short duration as well as chronic heat stress treatments, and are also expressed in different plant growth stages and tissue types.
    BMC Plant Biology 10/2013; 13(1):153. · 4.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cotton fiber length is very important to the quality of textiles. Understanding the genetics and physiology of cotton fiber elongation can provide valuable tools to the cotton industry by targeting genes or other molecules responsible for fiber elongation. Ligon Lintless-1 (Li1) is a monogenic mutant in Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) which exhibits an early cessation of fiber elongation resulting in very short fibers (< 6mm) at maturity. This presents an excellent model system for studying the underlying molecular and cellular processes involved with cotton fiber elongation. Previous reports have characterized Li1 at early cell wall elongation and during later secondary cell wall synthesis, however there has been very limited analysis of the transition period between these developmental time points. RESULTS: Physical and morphological measurements of the Li1 mutant fibers were conducted, including measurement of the cellulose content during development. Affymetrix microarrays were used to analyze transcript profiles at the critical developmental time points of 3 days post anthesis (DPA), the late elongation stage of 12 DPA and the early secondary cell wall synthesis stage of 16 DPA. The results indicated severe disruption to key hormonal and other pathways related to fiber development, especially pertaining to the transition stage from elongation to secondary cell wall synthesis. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis identified several key pathways at the transition stage that exhibited altered regulation. Genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis and primary cell wall rearrangement were affected, and a primary cell wall-related cellulose synthase was transcriptionally repressed. Linkage mapping using a population of 2,553 F2 individuals identified SSR markers associated with the Li1 genetic locus on chromosome 22. Linkage mapping in combination with utilizing the diploid G. raimondii genome sequences permitted additional analysis of the region containing the Li1 gene. CONCLUSIONS: The early termination of fiber elongation in the Li1 mutant is likely controlled by an early upstream regulatory factor resulting in the altered regulation of hundreds of downstream genes. Several elongation-related genes that exhibited altered expression profiles in the Li1 mutant were identified. Molecular markers closely associated with the Li1 locus were developed. Results presented here will lay the foundation for further investigation of the genetic and molecular mechanisms of fiber elongation.
    BMC Genomics 06/2013; 14(1):403. · 4.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the first reaction specific for proanthocyanidin (PA) biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula, anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) converts cyanidin to (-)-epicatechin. The glucosyltransferase UGT72L1 catalyzes formation of epicatechin 3'-O-glucoside (E3'OG), the preferred substrate for MATE transporters implicated in PA biosynthesis in both species. The mechanism of PA polymerization is still unclear, but may involve the laccase-like polyphenol oxidase TRANSPARENT TESTA 10 (TT10). We have employed a combination of cell biological, biochemical and genetic approaches to evaluate this PA pathway model. The promoter regions of UGT72L1 and MtANR share common cis-acting elements and direct overlapping, but partially distinct, expression patterns. UGT72L1 and MtANR are localized in the cytosol, whereas TT10 is localized to the vacuole. Over-expression of UGT72L1 in M. truncatula hairy roots results in increased accumulation of PA-like compounds, and loss of function of UGT72L1 partially reduces epicatechin, E3'OG and extractable PA levels in M. truncatula seeds. Expression of UGT72L1 in A. thaliana leads to a massive increase in E3'OG in immature seed, but reduced levels of extractable PAs. However, when UGT72L1 was expressed in the Arabidopsis tt10 mutant, extractable PA levels increased and seed coat browning was delayed. Our results suggest that glycosylation of epicatechin is important for both PA precursor transport and assembly, but that additional redundant pathways may exist.
    Planta 04/2013; · 3.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Plants encode a poorly understood superfamily of developmentally expressed cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs). One, EXTENSIN3 (EXT3) of the 168 putative HRGPs, is critical in the first steps of new wall assembly, demonstrated by broken and misplaced walls in its lethal homozygous mutant. Here we report the findings of phenotypic (not genotypic) revertants of the ext3 mutant and in-depth analysis including microarray and qRT-PCR. The aim was to identify EXT3 substitute(s), thus gaining a deeper understanding of new wall assembly. The data show differential expression in the ext3 mutant that included 61% (P ≤ 0.05) of the HRGP genes, and ability to self-rescue by reprogramming expression. Independent revertants had reproducible expression networks, largely heritable over the four generations tested, with some genes displaying transgenerational drift towards wild-type expression levels. Genes for nine candidate regulatory proteins as well as eight candidate HRGP building materials and/or facilitators of new wall assembly or maintenance, in the (near) absence of EXT3 expression, were identified. Seven of the HRGP fit the current model of EXT function. In conclusion, the data on phenotype comparisons and on differential expression of the genes-of-focus provide strong evidence that different combinations of HRGPs regulated by alternative gene expression networks, can make functioning cell walls, resulting in (apparently) normal plant growth and development. More broadly, this has implications for interpreting the cause of any mutant phenotype, assigning gene function, and genetically modifying plants for utilitarian purposes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    The Plant Journal 04/2013; · 6.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lotus japonicus is a model species for legume genomics. To accelerate legume functional genomics, we developed a Lotus japonicus Gene Expression Atlas (LjGEA), which provides a global view of gene expression in all organ systems of this species, including roots, nodules, stems, petioles, leaves, flowers, pods and seeds. Time-series data covering multiple stages of developing pod and seed are included in the LjGEA. In addition, previously published L. japonicus Affymetrix data are included in the database, making it a 'one-stop shop' for transcriptome analysis of this species. The LjGEA web server (http://ljgea.noble.org/) enables flexible, multi-faceted analyses of the transcriptome. Transcript data may be accessed using the Affymetrix probe identification number, DNA sequence, gene name, functional description in natural language, and GO and KEGG annotation terms. Genes may be discovered through co-expression or differential expression analysis. Users may select a subset of experiments and visualize and compare expression profiles of multiple genes simultaneously. Data may be downloaded in a tabular form compatible with common analytical and visualization software. To illustrate the power of LjGEA, we explored the transcriptome of developing seeds. Genes represented by 36 474 probe sets were expressed at some stage during seed development, and almost half of these genes displayed differential expression during development. Among the latter were 624 transcription factor genes, some of which are orthologs of transcription factor genes that are known to regulate seed development in other species, while most are novel and represent attractive targets for reverse genetics approaches to determine their roles in this important organ.
    The Plant Journal 03/2013; · 6.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Switchgrass (P. virgatum L.) is a perennial C4 grass with potential to become a major bioenergy crop. To help realize this potential, a set of RNA-based resources were developed. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated from two tetraploid switchgrass genotypes, Alamo AP13 and Summer VS16. Over 11.5 million high-quality ESTs were generated with 454 sequencing technology and an additional 169,079 Sanger sequences were obtained from the 5' and 3' ends of 93,312 clones from normalized, full-length-enriched cDNA libraries. AP13 and VS16 ESTs were assembled into 77,854 and 30,524 unique transcripts (unitranscripts), respectively, using the Newbler and PAVE programs. Published Sanger-ESTs (544,225) from Alamo, Kanlow, and 15 other cultivars were integrated with the AP13 and VS16 assemblies to create a universal switchgrass gene index (PviUT1.2) with 128,058 unitranscripts, which were annotated for function. An Affymetrix cDNA microarray chip (Pvi_cDNAa520831) containing 122,973 probe sets was designed from PviUT1.2 sequences, and used to develop a Gene Expression Atlas for switchgrass (PviGEA). The PviGEA contains quantitative transcript data for all major organ systems of switchgrass throughout development. We developed a web server that enables flexible, multifaceted analyses of PviGEA transcript data. The PviGEA was used to identify representatives of all known genes in the phenylpropanoid-monolignol biosynthesis pathway. © 2013 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
    The Plant Journal 01/2013; · 6.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the last two decades switchgrass has received increasing attention as a promising bioenergy feedstock. Biomass is the principal trait for improvement in switchgrass breeding programs and tillering is an important component of biomass yield. Switchgrass inbred lines derived from a single parent showing vast variation in tiller number trait was used in this study. Axillary buds, which can develop into tillers, and node tissues, which give rise to axillary buds, were collected from high and low tillering inbred lines growing in field conditions. RNA from buds and nodes from the contrasting inbred lines were used for transcriptome profiling with switchgrass Affymetrix genechips. Nearly 7% of the probesets on the genechip exhibited significant differential expression in these lines. Real-time PCR analysis of 30 genes confirmed the differential expression patterns observed with genechips. Cluster analysis aided in identifying probesets unique to high or low tillering lines as well as those specific to buds or nodes of high tillering lines. Rice orthologs of the switchgrass genes were used for gene ontology (GO) analysis with AgriGO. Enrichment of genes associated with amino acid biosynthesis, lipid transport and vesicular transport were observed in low tillering lines. Enrichment of GOs for translation, RNA binding and gene expression in high tillering lines were indicative of active metabolism associated with rapid growth and development. Identification of different classes of transcription factor genes suggests that regulation of many genes determines the complex process of axillary bud initiation and development. Genes identified in this study will complement the current ongoing efforts in quantitative trait loci mapping of tillering in switchgrass.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(12):e83772. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Building accurate gene regulatory networks (GRNs) from high-throughput gene expression data is a long-standing challenge. However, with the emergence of new algorithms combined with the increase of transcriptomic data availability, it is now reachable. To help biologists to investigate gene regulatory relationships, we developed a web-based computational service to build, analyze and visualize GRNs that govern various biological processes. The web server is preloaded with all available Affymetrix GeneChip-based transcriptomic and annotation data from the three model legume species, i.e., Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus and Glycine max. Users can also upload their own transcriptomic and transcription factor datasets from any other species/organisms to analyze their in-house experiments. Users are able to select which experiments, genes and algorithms they will consider to perform their GRN analysis. To achieve this flexibility and improve prediction performance, we have implemented multiple mainstream GRN prediction algorithms including co-expression, Graphical Gaussian Models (GGMs), Context Likelihood of Relatedness (CLR), and parallelized versions of TIGRESS and GENIE3. Besides these existing algorithms, we also proposed a parallel Bayesian network learning algorithm, which can infer causal relationships (i.e., directionality of interaction) and scale up to several thousands of genes. Moreover, this web server also provides tools to allow integrative and comparative analysis between predicted GRNs obtained from different algorithms or experiments, as well as comparisons between legume species. The web site is available at http://legumegrn.noble.org.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(7):e67434. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Drought and tropospheric ozone are escalating climate change problems that can co-occur. In this study, we observed Medicago truncatula cultivar Jemalong that is sensitive to ozone and drought stress when applied singly, showed tolerance when subjected to a combined application of these stresses. Lowered stomatal conductance may be a vital tolerance mechanism to overcome combined ozone and drought. Sustained increases in both reduced ascorbate and glutathione in response to combined stress may play a role in lowering reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide toxicity. Transcriptome analysis indicated that genes associated with glucan metabolism, responses to temperature and light signalling may play a role in dampening ozone responses due to drought-induced stomatal closure during combined occurrence of these two stresses. Gene ontologies for jasmonic acid signalling and innate immunity were enriched among the 300 differentially expressed genes unique to combined stress. Differential expression of transcription factors associated with redox, defence signalling, jasmonate responses and chromatin modifications may be important for evoking novel gene networks during combined occurrence of drought and ozone. The alterations in redox milieu and distinct transcriptome changes in response to combined stress could aid in tweaking the metabolome and proteome to annul the detrimental effects of ozone and drought in Jemalong.
    Plant Cell and Environment 09/2012; · 5.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Leaves of many plant species open during the day and fold at night. Diurnal leaf movement, named nyctinasty, has been of great interest to researchers since Darwin's time. Nyctinastic leaf movement is generated by the pulvinus, which is a specialized motor organ located at the base of leaf and leaflet. The molecular basis and functional reason behind nyctinasty are unknown. In a forward screening of a retrotransposon-tagged mutant population of Medicago truncatula, four petiolule-like pulvinus (plp) mutant lines with defects in leaf movement were identified and characterized. Loss of function of PLP results in the change of pulvini to petiolules. PLP is specifically expressed in the pulvinus, as demonstrated by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, expression analysis of a PLP promoter-β-glucuronidase construct in transgenic plants and in situ hybridization. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression levels of many genes were altered in the mutant during the day and at night. Crosses between the plp mutant and several leaf pattern mutants showed that the developmental mechanisms of pulvini and leaf patterns are likely independent. Our results demonstrated that PLP plays a crucial role in the determination of pulvinus development. Leaf movement generated by pulvini may have an impact on plant vegetative growth.
    New Phytologist 08/2012; 196(1):92-100. · 6.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) associated with D satellite RNA (satRNA) causes lethal systemic necrosis (LSN) in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), which involves programmed cell death. No resistance to this disease has been found in tomato. We obtained a line of wild tomato, S. habrochaitis, with a homogeneous non-lethal response (NLR) to the infection. This line of S. habrochaitis was crossed with tomato to generate F1 plants that survived the infection with NLR, indicating that NLR is a dominant trait. The NLR trait was successfully passed on to the next generation. The phenotype and genotype segregation was analyzed in the first backcross population. The analyses indicate that the NLR trait is determined by quantitative trait loci (QTL). Major QTL associated with the NLR trait were mapped to chromosomes 5 and 12. Results from Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses revealed that the F1 and S. habrochaitis plants accumulated minus-strand satRNA more slowly than tomato, and fewer vascular cells were infected. In addition, D satRNA-induced LSN in tomato is correlated with higher accumulation of the minus-strand satRNA compared with the accumulation of the minus strand of a non-necrogenic mutant D satRNA.
    Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions 08/2012; 25(8):1034-44. · 4.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: • The CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON (CUC)/NO APICAL MERISTEM (NAM) family of genes control boundary formation and lateral organ separation, which is critical for proper leaf and flower patterning. However, most downstream targets of CUC/NAM genes remain unclear. • In a forward screen of the tobacco retrotransposon1 (Tnt1) insertion population in Medicago truncatula, we isolated a weak allele of the no-apical-meristem mutant mtnam-2. Meanwhile, we regenerated a mature plant from the null allele mtnam-1. These materials allowed us to extensively characterize the function of MtNAM and its downstream genes. • MtNAM is highly expressed in vegetative shoot buds and inflorescence apices, specifically at boundaries between the shoot apical meristem and leaf/flower primordia. Mature plants of the regenerated null allele and the weak allele display remarkable floral phenotypes: floral whorls and organ numbers are reduced and the floral organ identity is compromised. Microarray and quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that all classes of floral homeotic genes are down-regulated in mtnam mutants. Mutations in MtNAM also lead to fused cotyledons and leaflets of the compound leaf as well as a defective shoot apical meristem. • Our results revealed that MtNAM shares the role of CUC/NAM family genes in lateral organ separation and compound leaf development, and is also required for floral organ identity and development.
    New Phytologist 04/2012; 195(1):71-84. · 6.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: • Successful genetic transformation of plants by Agrobacterium tumefaciens requires the import of bacterial T-DNA and virulence proteins into the plant cell that eventually form a complex (T-complex). The essential components of the T-complex include the single stranded T-DNA, bacterial virulence proteins (VirD2, VirE2, VirE3 and VirF) and associated host proteins that facilitate the transfer and integration of T-DNA. The removal of the proteins from the T-complex is likely achieved by targeted proteolysis mediated by VirF and the plant ubiquitin proteasome complex. • We evaluated the involvement of the host SKP1/culin/F-box (SCF)-E3 ligase complex and its role in plant transformation. Gene silencing, mutant screening and gene expression studies suggested that the Arabidopsis homologs of yeast SKP1 (suppressor of kinetochore protein 1) protein, ASK1 and ASK2, are required for Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation. • We identified the role for SGT1b (suppressor of the G2 allele of SKP1), an accessory protein that associates with SCF-complex, in plant transformation. We also report the differential expression of many genes that encode F-box motif containing SKP1-interacting proteins (SKIP) upon Agrobacterium infection. • We speculate that these SKIP genes could encode the plant specific F-box proteins that target the T-complex associated proteins for polyubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome.
    New Phytologist 04/2012; 195(1):203-16. · 6.74 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
367.57 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006–2014
    • The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation
      • Division of Plant Biology
      Ardmore, Oklahoma, United States
  • 2008–2012
    • Oklahoma State University - Stillwater
      • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
      Stillwater, OK, United States
    • Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
      Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States
  • 2011
    • Shandong University
      • School of Life Science
      Chi-nan-shih, Shandong Sheng, China
    • Southern Regional Medical Center
      Georgia, United States
  • 2010
    • U.S. Department of Energy
      Washington, Washington, D.C., United States
  • 2009
    • West Virginia University
      • Division of Plant and Soil Sciences
      Morgantown, WV, United States