Marian Peeters

Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands

Are you Marian Peeters?

Claim your profile

Publications (10)80.63 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hematopoiesis is initiated in several distinct tissues in the mouse conceptus. The aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region is of particular interest, as it autonomously generates the first adult type hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). The ventral position of hematopoietic clusters closely associated with the aorta of most vertebrate embryos suggests a polarity in the specification of AGM HSCs. Since positional information plays an important role in the embryonic development of several tissue systems, we tested whether AGM HSC induction is influenced by the surrounding dorsal and ventral tissues. Our explant culture results at early and late embryonic day 10 show that ventral tissues induce and increase AGM HSC activity, whereas dorsal tissues decrease it. Chimeric explant cultures with genetically distinguishable AGM and ventral tissues show that the increase in HSC activity is not from ventral tissue-derived HSCs, precursors or primordial germ cells (as was previously suggested). Rather, it is due to instructive signaling from ventral tissues. Furthermore, we identify Hedgehog protein(s) as an HSC inducing signal.
    Development 08/2009; 136(15):2613-21. · 6.21 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: During vertebrate embryogenesis, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) arise in the aorta-gonads-mesonephros (AGM) region. We report here that blood flow is a conserved regulator of HSC formation. In zebrafish, chemical blood flow modulators regulated HSC development, and silent heart (sih) embryos, lacking a heartbeat and blood circulation, exhibited severely reduced HSCs. Flow-modifying compounds primarily affected HSC induction after the onset of heartbeat; however, nitric oxide (NO) donors regulated HSC number even when treatment occurred before the initiation of circulation, and rescued HSCs in sih mutants. Morpholino knockdown of nos1 (nnos/enos) blocked HSC development, and its requirement was shown to be cell autonomous. In the mouse, Nos3 (eNos) was expressed in HSCs in the AGM. Intrauterine Nos inhibition or embryonic Nos3 deficiency resulted in a reduction of hematopoietic clusters and transplantable murine HSCs. This work links blood flow to AGM hematopoiesis and identifies NO as a conserved downstream regulator of HSC development.
    Cell 06/2009; 137(4):736-48. · 31.96 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hematopoietic progenitors are generated in the yolk sac and aorta-gonad-mesonephros region during early mouse development. At embryonic day 10.5 the first hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros. Subsequently, hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are found in the fetal liver. The fetal liver is a potent hematopoietic site, playing an important role in the expansion and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors and hematopoietic stem cells. However, little is known concerning the regulation of fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells. In particular, the role of cytokines such as interleukin-1 in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cells in the embryo has been largely unexplored. Recently, we observed that the adult pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 is involved in regulating aorta-gonad-mesonephros hematopoietic progenitor and hematopoietic stem cell activity. Therefore, we set out to investigate whether interleukin-1 also plays a role in regulating fetal liver progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells. We examined the interleukin-1 ligand and receptor expression pattern in the fetal liver. The effects of interleukin-1 on hematopoietic progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells were studied by FACS and transplantation analyses of fetal liver explants, and in vivo effects on hematopoietic stem cell and progenitors were studied in Il1r1(-/-) embryos. We show that fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells express the IL-1RI and that interleukin-1 increases fetal liver hematopoiesis, progenitor cell activity and promotes hematopoietic cell survival. Moreover, we show that in Il1r1(-/-) embryos, hematopoietic stem cell activity is impaired and myeloid progenitor activity is increased. The IL-1 ligand and receptor are expressed in the midgestation liver and act in the physiological regulation of fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells.
    Haematologica 03/2009; 94(4):462-9. · 5.94 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hematopoiesis during development is a dynamic process, with many factors involved in the emergence and regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells. Whereas previous studies have focused on developmental signaling and transcription factors in embryonic hematopoiesis, the role of well-known adult hematopoietic cytokines in the embryonic hematopoietic system has been largely unexplored. The cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1), best known for its proinflammatory properties, has radioprotective effects on adult bone marrow HSCs, induces HSC mobilization, and increases HSC proliferation and/or differentiation. Here we examine IL-1 and its possible role in regulating hematopoiesis in the midgestation mouse embryo. We show that IL-1, IL-1 receptors (IL-1Rs), and signaling mediators are expressed in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region during the time when HSCs emerge in this site. IL-1 signaling is functional in the AGM, and the IL-1RI is expressed ventrally in the aortic subregion by some hematopoietic, endothelial, and mesenchymal cells. In vivo analyses of IL-1RI-deficient embryos show an increased myeloid differentiation, concomitant with a slight decrease in AGM HSC activity. Our results suggest that IL-1 is an important homeostatic regulator at the earliest time of HSC development, acting to limit the differentiation of some HSCs along the myeloid lineage.
    Blood 10/2008; 112(13):4895-904. · 9.06 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) is expressed by various cell types. In plasma, it is associated with high density lipoproteins (HDL). Elevated levels of PLTP in transgenic mice result in decreased HDL and increased atherosclerosis. PLTP is present in human atherosclerotic lesions, where it seems to be macrophage derived. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the atherogenic potential of macrophage derived PLTP. Here we show that macrophages from human PLTP transgenic mice secrete active PLTP. Subsequently, we performed bone marrow transplantations using either wild type mice (PLTPwt/wt), hemizygous PLTP transgenic mice (huPLTPtg/wt) or homozygous PLTP transgenic mice (huPLTPtg/tg) as donors and low density lipoprotein receptor deficient mice (LDLR-/-) as acceptors, in order to establish the role of PLTP expressed by bone marrow derived cells in diet-induced atherogenesis. Atherosclerosis was increased in the huPLTPtg/wt-->LDLR-/- mice (2.3-fold) and even further in the huPLTPtg/tg-->LDLR-/- mice (4.5-fold) compared with the control PLTPwt/wt-->LDLR-/- mice (both P<0.001). Plasma PLTP activity levels and non-HDL cholesterol were increased and HDL cholesterol decreased compared with controls (all P<0.01). PLTP was present in atherosclerotic plaques in the mice as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and appears to co-localize with macrophages. Isolated macrophages from PLTP transgenic mice do not show differences in cholesterol efflux or in cytokine production. Lipopolysaccharide activation of macrophages results in increased production of PLTP. This effect was strongly amplified in PLTP transgenic macrophages. We conclude that PLTP expression by bone marrow derived cells results in atherogenic effects on plasma lipids, increased PLTP activity, high local PLTP protein levels in the atherosclerotic lesions and increased atherosclerotic lesion size.
    PLoS ONE 02/2008; 3(5):e2255. · 3.73 Impact Factor
  • Blood Cells Molecules and Diseases - BLOOD CELLS MOLECULES DIS. 01/2007; 38(2):144-144.
  • Blood Cells Molecules and Diseases - BLOOD CELLS MOLECULES DIS. 01/2007; 38(2):136-136.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cytokines are important in adult hematopoiesis, yet their function in embryonic hematopoiesis has been largely unexplored. During development, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are found in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, yolk sac (YS), and placenta and require the Runx1 transcription factor for their normal generation. Since IL-3 is a Runx1 target and this cytokine acts on adult hematopoietic cells, we examined whether IL-3 affects HSCs in the mouse embryo. Using Runx1 haploinsufficient mice, we show that IL-3 amplifies HSCs from E11 AGM, YS, and placenta. Moreover, we show that IL-3 mutant embryos are deficient in HSCs and that IL-3 reveals the presence of HSCs in the AGM and YS prior to the stage at which HSCs are normally detected. Thus, our studies support an unexpected role for IL-3 during development and strongly suggest that IL-3 functions as a proliferation and/or survival factor for the earliest HSCs in the embryo.
    Developmental Cell 09/2006; 11(2):171-80. · 12.86 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The first hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the mouse able to give rise to the adult hematopoietic system emerge at embryonic day (E) 10.5 in the intraembryonic aorta-gonads-mesonephros (AGM) region, as demonstrated by transplantation into irradiated adult recipients. It has been shown by transplantation into conditioned neonatal or hematopoietic mutant adult recipients that less potent multipotential hematopoietic progenitors exist in the mouse embryo at E9, one day earlier than the appearance of HSC. Studies of the lineage relationships of multipotential hematopoietic progenitors and HSC in the mouse embryo have been complicated by inaccessibility due to in utero development. Attempts are being made to create an in vitro whole mouse embryo culture system to access the developing mouse embryo for such studies of hematopoietic cell emergence during early and mid-gestational stages. The aim of this study was to compare the development of multipotential hematopoietic progenitors in early in utero and in vitro-developed mouse embryos. To test hematopoietic progentior/stem cell activity in the mouse embryonic tissues obtained from genetically marked in utero and in vitro-developed embryos, transplantations were performed using unconditioned neonatal W41/W41 (c-kit hematopoietic mutant) recipients. Long-term donor-cell reconstitution in transplanted mice was measured by (i) semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction and (ii) flow cytometry on peripheral blood and hematopoietic organs. Our experimental data show that multipotent hematopoietic progenitors from in utero-developed embryos engraft unconditioned W41/W41 neonates. Furthermore, in vitro-developed whole embryos also contain early multipotent hematopoietic progenitor cells that are able to yield high-level, long-term engraftment of W41/W41 neonates. The in vitro culture of whole mouse embryos during mid-gestational stages allows for the normal growth of multipotential hematopoietic progenitors that can be assayed by transplantation into W41/W41 neonatal recipients. Thus, in vitro-developed whole embryos can be used with confidence in future studies to examine the lineage relationships of multipotential hematopoietic progenitors and HSC.
    Haematologica 07/2005; 90(6):734-9. · 5.94 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Sca-1 surface glycoprotein is used routinely as a marker for haematopoietic stem cell enrichment. Two allelic genes, Ly-6A and Ly-6E, encode this marker and appear to be differentially regulated in haematopoietic cells and haematopoietic stem cells. The Sca-1 protein has been shown to be expressed at a greater frequency in these cells from Ly-6A strains of mice. To study the specific expression pattern and haematopoietic regulation of the Ly-6A gene, we constructed a 14 kb cassette from a genomic Ly-6A fragment, inserted a lacZ reporter gene and created transgenic mice. We found that the Ly-6A lacZ transgene was expressed in the haematopoietic tissues and predominantly in the T-lymphoid lineage. Some expression was also found in the B-lymphoid and myeloid lineages. We demonstrated functional haematopoietic stem cell enrichment by sorting for beta-galactosidase-expressing cells from the bone marrow. In addition, we found an interesting embryonic expression pattern in the AGM region, the site of the first haematopoietic stem cell generation. Surprisingly, when compared with data from Ly-6E lacZ transgenic mice, our results suggest that the Ly-6A cassette does not improve lacZ marker gene expression in haematopoietic cells.
    British Journal of Haematology 03/2002; 116(2):401-8. · 4.94 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

230 Citations
80.63 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007–2009
    • Erasmus MC
      • Department of Cell Biology
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2002–2009
    • Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands