Lisa A Vathy

State University of New York, New York City, New York, United States

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Publications (9)41.25 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The goal of our studies was to determine lymphatic uptake of bovine serum albumin (BSA) using real-time noninvasive fluorescence imaging. BSA labeled with near-infrared dye (IRDye) 680 was used as a model protein-dye conjugate. The conjugation of BSA with IRDye 680 was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography and SDS-PAGE demonstrated that the IRDye 680-labeled BSA conjugate in the lymph node (LN) homogenate samples was stable at physiological temperature (37°C) for at least 5 days. Whole-body noninvasive optical imaging of hairless SKH-1 mice was performed after subcutaneous (s.c.) injection (dose = 0.1 mg/kg) into the front footpad. Noninvasive fluorescence imaging demonstrated that BSA-IRDye 680 conjugates were dynamically taken up by the lymphatic system, accumulated in the axillary LNs and then cleared, indicating that lymphatic transport plays a role in the absorption of BSA. Ex vivo tissue imaging of LN homogenates provided confirmatory data with respect to the uptake of fluorescent-labeled BSA determined by in vivo imaging. Noninvasive real-time imaging of LNs provides a novel tool for evaluating uptake and accumulation of fluorescent-labeled proteins by the lymphatic system after s.c. injection in a mouse model.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences 01/2012; 101(5):1744-54. · 3.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Theranostic platform integrating diagnostic imaging and therapeutic function into a single system has become a new direction of nanoparticle research. In the process of treatment, therapeutic efficacy is monitored. The use of theranostic nanoparticle can add an additional "layer" to keep track on the therapeutic agent such as the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. In this report, we have developed quantum rod (QR) based formulations for the delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to human neuronal cells. PEGlyated QRs with different surface functional groups (amine and maleimide) were designed for selectively down-regulating the dopaminergic signaling pathway which is associated with the drug abuse behavior. We have demonstrated that the DARPP-32 siRNAs were successfully delivered to dopaminergic neuronal (DAN) cells which led to drastic knockdown of specific gene expression by both the electrostatic and covalent bond conjugation regimes. The PEGlyated surface offered high biocompatibilities and negligible cytotoxicities to the QR formulations that may facilitate the in vivo applications of these nanoparticles.
    Theranostics 01/2012; 2(7):695-704. · 7.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The goal of our studies was to determine lymphatic uptake of bovine serum albumin (BSA) using real-time non-invasive fluorescence imaging. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) labeled with IRDye 680 was used as a model protein-dye conjugate. The conjugation of BSA with IRDye 680 was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Size exclusion HPLC and SDS-PAGE demonstrated that the IRDye 680 labeled BSA conjugate in the lymph node homogenate samples was stable at physiological temperature (37°C) for at least 5 days. Whole body non-invasive optical imaging of hairless SKH-1 mice was performed after SC injection (dose = 0.1 mg/kg) into the front footpad. Non-invasive fluorescence imaging demonstrated that BSA-IRDye 680 conjugates were dynamically taken up by the lymphatic system, accumulated in the axillary lymph nodes and then cleared, indicating that the lymphatic transport plays a role in the absorption of BSA. Ex vivo tissue imaging of lymph node homogenates provided confirmatory data with respect to the uptake of fluorescent-labeled BSA determined by in vivo imaging. Noninvasive real time imaging of lymph nodes provides a novel tool for evaluating uptake and accumulation of fluorescent-labeled proteins by the lymphatic system after SC injection in a mouse model.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences 01/2012; · 3.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nanoparticles internalized by cells are valuable probes for bioimaging. In particular, nanoparticles can be detected in “biological transmission window,” i.e., near infrared region. Here, we report a preparation of biotargeting diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTC)-functionalized gold nanorods, utilized for detection of malignant cells. These biotargeting DTTC-functionalized gold nanorods are efficiently internalized into cultured cells and can serve as probes for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and dark-field imaging. The robust SERS signal from malignant cells has clearly demonstrated a signature peak of DTTC in the presence of our formulation. A short acquisition time, we used in this experiment, is able to exclude bulk of Raman signal from natural cellular constituents. This signature peak will be a key of identifying cancer due to cancer-specific property of biotargeted molecule. The results are leading to promising real-time cancer detection. In addition, these multimodal probes demonstrated low toxicity in cell viability studies which enables a broad range of multiplex imaging applications.
    Plasmonics 01/2012; · 2.43 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Pharmaceutical Science. 01/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: In this contribution, we report the use of a PEGylated gold nanorods formulation as a colored dye for tumor labeling in vivo. We have demonstrated that the nanorod-targeted tumor site can be easily differentiated from the background tissues by the 'naked eye' without the need of sophisticated imaging instruments. In addition to tumor labeling, we have also performed in vivo toxicity and biodistribution studies of PEGylated gold nanorods in vivo by using BALB/c mice as the model. In vivo toxicity studies indicated no mortality or adverse effects or weight changes in BALB/c mice treated with PEGylated gold nanorods. This finding will provide useful guidelines in the future development of diagnostic probes for cancer diagnosis, optically guided tumor surgery, and lymph node mapping applications.
    Nanotechnology 08/2010; 21(31):315101. · 3.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we report the use of near-infrared (NIR)-emitting alloyed quantum dots (QDs) as efficient optical probes for high contrast in vivo imaging of tumors. Alloyed CdTe(1 - x)Se(x)/CdS QDs were prepared in the non-aqueous phase using the hot colloidal synthesis approach. Water dispersion of the QDs were accomplished by their encapsulation within polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-grafted phospholipid micelles. For tumor-specific delivery in vivo, the micelle-encapsulated QDs were conjugated with the cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide, which targets the alpha(v)beta(3) integrins overexpressed in the angiogenic tumor vasculatures. Using in vivo NIR optical imaging of mice bearing pancreatic cancer xenografts, implanted both subcutaneously and orthotopically, we have demonstrated that systemically delivered cRGD-conjugated QDs, but not the unconjugated ones, can efficiently target and label the tumors with high signal-to-noise ratio. Histopathological analysis of major organs of the treated mice showed no evidence of systemic toxicity associated with these QDs. These experiments suggest that cRGD-conjugated NIR QDs can serve as safe and efficient probes for optical bioimaging of tumors in vivo. Furthermore, by co-encapsulating these QDs and anticancer drugs within these micelles, we have demonstrated a promising theranostic, nanosized platform for both cancer imaging and therapy.
    Nanotechnology 03/2010; 21(14):145105. · 3.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Successful translation of the use of nanoparticles from laboratories to clinics requires exhaustive and elaborate studies involving the biodistribution, clearance, and biocompatibility of nanoparticles for in vivo biomedical applications. We report here the use of multimodal organically modified silica (ORMOSIL) nanoparticles for in vivo bioimaging, biodistribution, clearance, and toxicity studies. We have synthesized ORMOSIL nanoparticles with diameters of 20-25 nm, conjugated with near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores and radiolabeled them with (124)I, for optical and PET imaging in vivo. The biodistribution of the nontargeted nanoparticles was studied in nontumored nude mice by optical fluorescence imaging, as well by measuring the radioactivity from harvested organs. Biodistribution studies showed a greater accumulation of nanoparticles in liver, spleen, and stomach than in kidney, heart, and lungs. The clearance studies carried out over a period of 15 days indicated hepatobiliary excretion of the nanoparticles. Selected tissues were analyzed for any potential toxicity by histological analysis, which confirmed the absence of any adverse effect or any other abnormalities in the tissues. The results demonstrate that these multimodal nanoparticles have potentially ideal attributes for use as biocompatible probes for in vivo imaging.
    ACS Nano 02/2010; 4(2):699-708. · 12.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this contribution, we demonstrate that highly luminescent CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum rods (QRs) coated with PEGylated phospholipids and conjugated with cyclic RGD peptide can be successfully used for tumor targeting and imaging in live animals. The design of these targeted luminescent probes involves encapsulation of hydrophobic CdSe/CdS/ZnS QRs with PEGylated phospholipids, followed by conjugation of these PEGylated phospholipids to ligands that specifically target the tumor vasculature. In vivo optical imaging studies in nude mice bearing pancreatic cancer xenografts, both subcutaneous and orthotopic, indicate that the QR probes accumulate at tumor sites via the cyclic RGD peptides on the QR surface binding to the alpha(V)beta(3) integrins overexpressed in the tumor vasculature, following systemic injection. In vivo tumor detection studies showed no adverse effects even at a dose roughly 6.5 times higher than has been reported for in vivo imaging studies using quantum dots. Cytotoxicity studies indicated the absence of any toxic effect in the cellular and tissue levels arising from functionalized QRs. These results demonstrate the vast potential of QRs as bright, photostable, and biocompatible luminescent probes for the early diagnosis of cancer.
    ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 03/2009; 1(3):710-9. · 5.01 Impact Factor