Are you B Kopf?

Claim your profile

Publications (9)29.05 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We verified the feasibility of a multi-cycle peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC)-supported high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) regimen in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The HDC regimen consisted of a single course of high-dose epirubicin given in combination with cisplatin plus filgrastim, followed by three courses of high doses of carboplatin and paclitaxel with PBPC reinfusion and filgrastim. Of the 16 enrolled patients, 13 provided an adequate number of PBPCs by a single leukapheresis, while in the three needed two procedures, with a median number of CD34+, CD34+/CD33- and CD34+/CD38- cells collected per patient was 13.5 x 10(6), 10.9 x 10(6) and 0.9 x 10(6)/kg, respectively. No toxic death occurred, and the collected PBPCs supported a rapid hematopoietic reconstitution after HDC; however, seven patients early interrupted the treatment early due to early progressive disease (n=4) or prolonged grade 3 peripheral neurotoxicity (n=3). Despite an overall response rate of 42%, the median survival for stage IV patients has been 5 months (range: 1-25+). Of two patients with stage IIIB NSCLC, one is continuously disease-free at 71+ months, while of 14 with stage IV disease, one is currently alive with disease at 25+ months. In conclusion, the combination of high-dose epirubicin with cisplatin plus filgrastim is an effective regimen in releasing large amounts of PBPCs, which can then be safely employed to support multiple courses of HDC. Multiple cycles of PBPC-supported high-dose carboplatin and paclitaxel are ineffective in treating patients with advanced NSCLC.
    Bone Marrow Transplantation 11/2007; 40(8):735-9. · 3.54 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Intraocular metastases, especially to the retina, are uncommon in cancer patients and generally occur in an advanced phase of the disease. In patients with lung cancer, uveal metastases, in particular to the choroid, are the most frequent, and are associated mainly with small cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma. We report a case of unilateral retinal detachment as first sign of a moderately differentiated lung adenocarcinoma in a 55-year-old non-smoker that was admitted to the hospital for the first time complaining of a sudden visual loss in the superior fields of the left eye. A CT revealed a slight retinal enlargement of the left eye and a solid mass of about 3 centimeters behind the right pulmonary hilus. Bronchoscopic biopsies were performed with diagnosis of adenocarcinoma of the lung. The patient died after 2 months for rapid progression of the disease despite of combined chemotherapy treatment.
    Journal of experimental & clinical cancer research: CR 04/2007; 26(1):141-3. · 1.50 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Annals of Oncology 02/2007; 18(1):202-3. · 7.38 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We conducted a prospective randomized clinical trial to assess the mobilizing efficacy of filgrastim, lenograstim and molgramostim following a disease-specific chemotherapy regimen. Mobilization consisted of high-dose cyclophosphamide in 45 cases (44%), and cisplatin/ifosfamide/etoposide or vinblastine in 22 (21%), followed by randomization to either filgrastim or lenograstim or molgramostim at 5 microg/kg/day. One hundred and three patients were randomized, and 82 (79%) performed apheresis. Forty-four (43%) patients were chemonaive, whereas 59 (57%) were pretreated. A median number of one apheresis per patient (range, 1-3) was performed. The median number of CD34+ cells obtained after mobilization was 8.4 x 10(6)/kg in the filgrastim arm versus 5.8 x 10(6)/kg in the lenograstim arm versus 4.0 x 10(6)/kg in the molgramostim arm (P=0.1). A statistically significant difference was observed for the median number of days of growth factor administration in favor of lenograstim (12 days) versus filgrastim (13 days) and molgramostim (14 days) (P<0.0001) and for the subgroup of chemonaive patients (12 days) versus pretreated patients (14 days) (P<0.001). In conclusion, all three growth factors were efficacious in mobilizing peripheral blood progenitor cells with no statistically significant difference between CD34+ cell yield and the different regimens, and the time to apheresis is likely confounded by the different mobilization regimens.
    Bone Marrow Transplantation 09/2006; 38(6):407-12. · 3.54 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To verify the feasibility of, and quantify the risk of, pneumonitis from locoregional radiotherapy (RT) after high-dose dense chemotherapy with epirubicin and paclitaxel with peripheral blood progenitor cell support in patients with high-risk Stage II-III breast cancer. Treatment consisted of a mobilizing course of epirubicin 150 mg/m2, preceded by dexrazoxane (Day 1), paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 (Day 2), and filgrastim; followed by three courses of epirubicin 150 mg/m2, preceded by dexrazoxane (Day 1), paclitaxel 400 mg/m2 (Day 2), and peripheral blood progenitor cell support and filgrastim, every 16-19 days. After chemotherapy, patients were treated with locoregional RT, which included the whole breast or the chest wall, axilla, and supraclavicular area. Overall, 64 of 69 patients were evaluable. The interval between the end of chemotherapy and the initiation of RT was at least 1.5-2 months (mean 2). No treatment-related death was reported. After a median follow-up of 27 months from RT (range 5-77 months), neither clinically relevant radiation pneumonitis nor congestive heart failure had been reported. Minor and transitory lung and cardiac toxicities were observed. Sequential high doses of epirubicin, preceded by dexrazoxane, and paclitaxel did not adversely affect the tolerability of locoregional RT in breast cancer patients. The risk of pneumonitis was not affected by the use of sequential paclitaxel with an interval of at least 1.5-2 months between the end of chemotherapy and the initiation of RT. Long-term follow-up is needed to define the risk of cardiotoxicity in these patients.
    International Journal of Radiation OncologyBiologyPhysics 08/2006; 65(4):1165-9. · 4.52 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hemangiopericytoma is a rare and characteristically hypervascular tumour. We report a case of hepatic metastases of hemangiopericytoma for which there was correlative imaging by ultrasonography, ultrasonography with second-generation contrast agent (BR1), computed tomography, gadolinium-enhanced, Gd-BOPTA-enhanced and ferumoxides-enhanced magnetic resonance, and angiography. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case in which all these modalities were used in the diagnostic evaluation.
    Cancer Imaging 02/2006; 6:56-9. · 1.59 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Primary carcinoid tumor of the ovary is an extremely rare neoplasm, accounting for less than 0.1 % of all ovarian neoplasms. We report a case of a 79-year-old woman with locally advanced ovarian carcinoid presenting as acute abdomen. At laparotomy, a large mass appeared in the pelvis, with maximum size of 18 cm, growing from the left ovary with infiltration of the left Fallopian tube and compression of the small bowel and the sigmoid tract. A bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed, and the tumor mass was completely removed. Post-operative treatments were not considered due to the absence of data in literature to support adjuvant treatments. Ten years after surgery the patient remains well without evidence of recurrence. Older age should not be considered an absolute contraindication for aggressive surgery, if this represents the best chance of cure. An aggressive cytoreductive surgery remains the best treatment for advanced or locally advanced primary ovarian carcinoid.
    Journal of experimental & clinical cancer research: CR 07/2005; 24(2):313-6. · 1.50 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: About 40% of patients with advanced cancer develop metastases in the central nervous system (CNS), mainly from primary tumors of lung, breast and melanoma. In most of cases there are multiple CNS metastases, making surgery or localized radiosurgery not feasible. The current standard of care for these patients is radiation therapy, which can improve neurologic symptoms but does not have any impact on the patient's overall survival. Temozolomide, capecitabine and gefitinib are safe and active in the treatment of CNS metastases from melanoma/recurrent gliomas, breast carcinoma and lung cancer, respectively. New, orally administered drugs hold a great potential for patients with CNS metastases.
    Journal of chemotherapy (Florence, Italy) 12/2004; 16 Suppl 5:94-7. · 0.83 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Standard chemotherapy in elderly patients is still nowadays a difficult issue, due to the fact that marrow reserve decrease with age and the results might lead to higher toxicity of otherwise well tolerated regimen and schedule. In the literature, very few data exist of myelosuppression in patients with solid tumors, while more data have been published on non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The burden of toxicity increase with age, leading to the fact that some patients with curable or sensitive disease do not receive appropriate treatment. One of the ways to try to circumvent neutropenia is the prophylactic use of haematopoietic growth factors with the double aim of maintaining dose-intensity and reducing toxicity. This paper will describe the patterns of marrow toxicity in treating elderly patients with cancer and the role of haematopoietic growth factors.
    Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology 07/2003; 46(3):247-53. · 4.64 Impact Factor