Takashi Horaguchi

Nihon University, Tokyo, Tokyo-to, Japan

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Publications (16)36.01 Total impact

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The biological tissue is irradiated with laser light, and carbonization, incineration, evaporation, blood coagulation, protein denaturation, and photoactivation will arise in order of the strength of the reaction. LLLT is the application of those photoactivated biological effects. In this paper, effective pain relief, photoactivation effect on chondrocytes, and, PDT (photodynamic therapy) using photosensitizer are introduced.
    Masui. The Japanese journal of anesthesiology 07/2012; 61(7):706-17.
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate rollback of the femoral condyle in anatomical double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL). Twenty-two subjects who underwent anatomical double-bundle ACL reconstruction were included in this study. More than 6 months after surgery, lateral radiographic imaging of the knee was performed with active full knee flexion. The most posterior tibiofemoral contact point was measured for evaluation of femoral rollback (rollback ratio). Flexion angle was also measured using the same radiograph, and the correlation between rollback and flexion angle was analyzed. As a control, radiographs of the healthy contralateral knees were evaluated. For clinical evaluation, side-to-side difference in anterior tibial translation (ATT) and pivot shift test were analyzed approximately 1 year after surgery. The rollback ratios of the operated knees and the healthy contralateral knees were 28.7 ± 6.6 and 29.7 ± 6.7%, respectively, from the posterior edge of the tibia. No significant difference in rollback was observed. The flexion angles of the operated knees and the healthy contralateral knees were 136 ± 11° and 140 ± 9°, respectively. No significant difference in knee flexion angle was observed. Significant correlation between femoral rollback and knee flexion angle was observed. The side-to-side difference in ATT was 0.7 mm, and no cases of positive pivot shift were observed. Anatomical double-bundle ACL reconstruction can restore normal femoral rollback in active full knee flexion. For clinical relevance, knees with anatomical double-bundle ACL reconstruction can flex with normal kinematics at the end of knee flexion angle. III.
    Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy 09/2011; 20(5):941-6. · 2.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to reveal the predicting factors for muscle recovery in the lower extremity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. One hundred and thirty-five (135) patients who underwent ACL reconstruction using hamstring autograft were evaluated. Exclusion criteria were bilateral ACL injury, chondral treatment and multiple ligament injury. Nonanatomical single-bundle reconstruction (SB) was performed in 79 patients, and anatomical double-bundle reconstruction (DB) was performed in 56 patients. Strength of quadriceps and knee flexion muscles were assessed at 60°/s using a Cybex II dynamometer (Lumex, Ronkonkoma, NY) at 3, 6 and 9 months after ACL reconstruction. Anterior tibial translation and pivot shift test were also evaluated. The medical records were reviewed to extract the following information: age, gender, the amount of pre and postoperative KT 1000, technique of reconstruction (SB or DB) and postoperative knee rotation. No significant difference of muscle recovery in the lower extremity was observed at any time point after ACL reconstruction between the SB and DB groups. The DB group showed significantly better postoperative antero-posterior and rotational knee laxity than the SB group. Logistic regression analysis showed significant correlation with only age and muscle recovery. For clinical relevance, there is a risk of muscle recovery delay when ACL reconstruction is performed in elderly patients. Anatomical DB reconstruction resulted in significantly better knee stability, but had no positive effect on muscle recovery. Retrospective study, Level II.
    Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy 08/2011; 20(1):173-8. · 2.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There have been few studies investigating the correct anatomical femoral and tibial tunnel placement in double bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. To compare anteromedial (AM) and posterolateral (PL) tunnel positions in anatomical double bundle ACL reconstruction in human cadaver and patient knees. Fifteen fresh-frozen non-paired adult human knees and 27 patients (27 knees) were evaluated. In the cadaver knees, AM and PL bundles were identified by their difference in tension patterns. Their femoral centers were marked with a K-wire, and cut from the femoral insertion site. After this, each bundle was divided at the tibial side. The center of each bundle insertion was again marked with a K-wire, and 5-7-mm tunnels were drilled with transportal or outside-in technique. In patient knees, each tunnel was made according to the native ACL foot print and bony landmarks using transtibial technique (n = 5) and transportal technique (n = 22). Tunnel placement was evaluated using a C-arm X-ray device and 3D CT. For the femoral side assessment, Bernard and Hertel's technique was used. For the tibial side assessment, Amis and Jakob's technique was used. The femoral AM tunnel in the cadaver knees was placed in a significantly deeper position when compared to patient knees. There was no significant difference in the AM vertical placement or in the PL tunnel placement in the femur. No significant differences were observed in the tibial tunnel placements between cadaver and patient knees. In vivo positioning of the femoral AM bundle differed significantly from the in vitro positioning.
    Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery 05/2011; 131(8):1085-90. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to reveal the relationship between anatomically placed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft and the intercondylar roof using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twenty patients undergoing anatomical double-bundle ACL reconstruction were included in this study. Anatomical double-bundle ACL reconstruction was performed with two femoral tunnels (antero-medial; AM and postero-lateral; PL) and two tibial tunnels. Hamstring autograft was used in all cases. More than 6 months after operation, MRI was performed with full knee extension. The relationship between the graft and the intercondylar roof was evaluated using an axial view of the T2 image at the most distal slice of the intercondylar roof. Qualitative evaluation of the ACL graft was performed with a sagittal view of the T2 image. Tunnel placement was evaluated with three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) and radiographs. The extension angle of the knee was also evaluated with 3D-CT. In 12 subjects, the ACL graft touched the roof (Touch group) but no graft deformation was observed. In 8 subjects, no roof-graft contact was observed (Non-touch group). In 1 case, the ACL graft was bowed posteriorly. Signal intensity alteration of the graft was observed in 3 cases. No significant difference in femoral and tibial tunnel placement was observed between the Touch and Non-touch groups. All subjects attained full knee extension. Although graft-roof impingement after anatomical double-bundle ACL reconstruction was suspected in some cases after the MRI evaluation, no extension loss in the knee was observed. In these suspected cases of impingement, long-term follow-up will be needed to determine the connection between any potential pathological effects. For the clinical relevance, MRI is an effective tool to determine the status of roof impingement in anatomical double-bundle ACL reconstruction.
    Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy 04/2011; 19 Suppl 1:S22-8. · 2.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Intercondylar notch narrowing is a risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but it is unclear whether a narrow intercondylar notch correlates with bilateral ACL injuries. To determine whether a narrow intercondylar notch is associated with bilateral ACL knee injuries in athletes, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiography to investigate the notch size. A retrospective case-control study. This was a comparative cohort study on 50 subjects of which 25 patients with sport trauma-associated bilateral ACL injuries, 30 with unilateral ACL injuries, and 20 healthy subjects. The notch width index (NWI) was measured as the ratio of the width of the intercondylar notch to the femoral condylar width on radiography and the MRI slice containing the region near the ACL attachment site on the femoral side (NWI-A) and on the following posterior slice (NWI-P). The mean NWI values on radiography were 0.257 (SD 0.040), 0.332 (SD 0.036), and 0.341 (SD 0.027) in the bilateral, unilateral, and control groups, respectively, with significant differences between the bilateral and unilateral groups and the bilateral and healthy groups. On MRI, the mean NWI-A values were 0.236 (SD 0.025), 0.243 (SD 0.048), and 0.266 (SD 0.030), respectively, with a significant difference between the bilateral and healthy groups. The mean NWI-P values were 0.239 (SD 0.021), 0.258 (SD 0.038), and 0.273 (SD 0.033), respectively, with significant differences between the bilateral and unilateral groups and the unilateral and healthy groups. A cutoff value of 0.25 for NWI-P gave an odds ratio of 22.667 for the risk of developing bilateral ACL knee injuries. The intercondylar notch was significantly narrower in subjects with bilateral ACL injuries than in healthy subjects. NWI measurement using coronal MRI is useful for judging intercondylar notch narrowing. The risk for ACL injuries is very high when NWI is ≤0.25. Preventive measures for the unaffected knee are required for patients with a narrow intercondylar notch.
    Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery 03/2011; 131(3):371-6. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To reveal the relationship between anatomically placed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft and the intercondylar roof using three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT). Twenty-four patients undergoing anatomical double-bundle ACL reconstruction were included in this study. Anatomical double-bundle ACL reconstruction was performed with two femoral tunnels (antero-medial; AM and postero-lateral; PL) and two tibial tunnels. Hamstring autograft was used in all cases. Six to eight weeks after operation and when the subjects had obtained full extension of the knee, 3D-CT was performed with full knee extension. In the 3D-CT, the ACL graft was also reconstructed and visualized three dimensionally. Tunnel placement was evaluated with 3D-CT and intra-operative radiographs. The extension angle of the knee was also evaluated with 3D-CT. No intercondylar roof impingement was observed. In 12 subjects, the ACL graft touched the roof (Touch group) but no graft deformation was observed. In 12 subjects, no roof-graft contact was observed (Non-touch group). No significant difference in femoral and tibial tunnel placement was observed between the Touch and Non-touch groups. All subjects attained full knee extension. We believe that 3D-CT is an effective means of evaluating impingement after ACL reconstruction. For the clinical relevance, when the grafts are positioned in an anatomical fashion, there is no risk of impingement, and surgeons can perform anatomical double-bundle ACL as an impingement-free reconstruction. Level of evidence: III (Case control study).
    Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy 12/2010; 19(4):674-9. · 2.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we examined the therapeutic effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using the photosensitizer Na-Pheophorbide a (Na-Phde a) on osteomyelitis models in rats. Osteomyelitis is one of the most serious infectious problems in the orthopedic field. Recently, as a new clinical approach against septic arthritis, an experimental in vivo and in vitro model for the inactivation of methicillin-resistant-Staphylococcus aureus by PDT using Na-Phde a has been developed. Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) was injected into the tibia of the rats to create osteomyelitis models (n = 10, 10 legs). A total of 560 μmol/l of Na-Phde a solution was injected into five of these tibial osteomyelitis models (five legs) 48 h after the initial MSSA infection. Sixty minutes after the Na-Phde a injection, a semiconductor laser (125 mW, 670 nm) was used to irradiate the models for 10 min with a total energy of 93.8 J/mm(2). As a control group, five rats (five legs) were treated with a phosphate buffered saline injection at 48 h after MSSA infection. Weight and leg perimeter changes were plotted. Bacterial growth, histological examination and radiological examination were evaluated at 14 days after initial treatment. PDT with Na-Phde a significantly prevented leg swelling. In the PDT group, bone destruction owing to osteomyelitis was inhibited not only histologically but also radiographically. The results in these experiments show that PDT using Na-Phde a improved osteomyelitis in rats. This suggests that PDT using Na- Phde a can be a useful treatment for osteomyelitis.
    Photomedicine and laser surgery 12/2010; 29(3):183-9. · 1.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rehabilitation is one of the most critical points after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, the recent trend of low-cost, short-term hospitalization makes sufficient rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction difficult. Level of evidence III: 34 patients who underwent non-anatomical single bundle ACL reconstruction using a hamstring auto graft were evaluated. Twenty patients (12 males and 8 females) were transferred to a special rehabilitation hospital (RH hospital group) after operation and concentrated rehabilitation was performed up to 4 h per day. Fourteen (9 males and 5 females) patients performed clinic-based rehabilitation at a university hospital three times per week (clinic group). Strength of quadriceps and knee flexion muscles was assessed at 60 degrees /s using a Cybex II dynamometer (Lumex, Ronkonkoma, NY, USA) at 3, 6 and 9 months after ACL reconstruction. Anterior tibial translation (ATT) and pivot shift test were also evaluated. No significant difference in muscle recovery in the lower extremity was observed at any time point after ACL reconstruction between the clinic group and the RH hospital group. However, 3 months after operation, the average muscle strength of the RH hospital group tended to be higher than that of the clinic group. There was no significant difference in ATT or pivot shift (each group included 4 positive pivot shift subjects) in the patients who were tested between the clinic group and the RH hospital group. Concentrated rehabilitation at a rehabilitation hospital after ACL reconstruction has the potential to improve muscle strength in the lower extremities more dramatically in the early stages of post operation. However, the initial benefits of intensive physiotherapy disappear after 6 months.
    Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery 08/2010; 130(8):1053-8. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to investigate the accurate AM and PL tunnel positions in an anatomical double-bundle ACL reconstruction using human cadaver knees with an intact ACL. Fifteen fresh-frozen non-paired adult human knees with a median age of 60 were used. AM and PL bundles were identified by the difference in tension patterns. First, the center of femoral PL and AM bundles were marked with a K-wire and cut from the femoral insertion site. Next, each bundle was divided at the tibial side, and the center of each AM and PL tibial insertion was again marked with a K-wire. Tunnel placement was evaluated using a C-arm radiographic device. For the femoral side assessment, Bernard and Hertel's technique was used. For the tibial side assessment, Staubli's technique was used. After radiographic evaluations, all tibias' soft tissues were removed with a 10% NaOH solution, and tunnel placements were evaluated. In the radiographic evaluation, the center of the femoral AM tunnel was placed at 15% in a shallow-deep direction and at 26% in a high-low direction. The center of the PL bundle was found at 32% in a shallow-deep direction and 52% in a high-low direction. On the tibial side, the center of the AM tunnel was placed at 31% from the anterior edge of the tibia, and the PL tunnel at 50%. The ACL tibial footprint was placed close to the center of the tibia and was oriented sagittally. AM and PL tunnels can be placed in the ACL insertions without any coalition. The native ACL insertion site has morphological variety in both the femoral and tibial sides. This study showed, anatomically and radiologically, the AM and PL tunnel positions in an anatomical ACL reconstruction. We believe that this study will contribute to an accurate tunnel placement during ACL reconstruction surgery and provide reference data for postoperative radiographic evaluation.
    Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy 04/2010; 18(9):1226-31. · 2.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) against methicillin resistant-Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by selecting different light sources for irradiation and combining them with the photosensitizer Na-Pheophorbide a (Na-Phde a). The treatment of drug-resistant bacterial infection is a serious issue. Recently, as a new clinical approach against septic arthritis, an experimental in vivo and in vitro model for the inactivation of MRSA by PDT using the photosensitizer Na-Phde a has been developed. Na-Phde a solution (280 micromol/L) was mixed with MRSA strain bacterial inoculum. After 60 minutes, light was irradiated for 30 minutes using the following light sources: GaA1p semiconductor laser (300 mW, 670 nm), halogen lamp (75 W), xenon lamp (300 W) and fluorescent lamp (27 W). Bacterial growth was evaluated after 24 hours incubation in a blood agar culture. The semiconductor laser and halogen lamp groups showed perfect bactericidal effects after PDT. The xenon lamp and fluorescent lamp groups showed partial bactericidal effects. The results of this experiment showed that PDT using the combination of Na-Phde a with a semiconductor laser or halogen lamp showed a better bactericidal performance than with xenon or fluorescent lamps. These findings indicated that PDT using Na-Phde a could be a useful treatment for septic arthritis and soft tissue infection.
    Photomedicine and laser surgery 09/2009; 27(6):849-53. · 1.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several species of animals are used as a model to study human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. In many animals, three bundles were clearly discernible during dissection in the ACL. However, there are few reports about the biomechanical role of each bundle in the porcine knee. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of each of the three bundles in the porcine knee, especially the intermediate bundle. Ten porcine knees were tested using a robotic/universal forcemoment sensor system. This system applied anterior loading of 89 N at 30 degrees, 60 degrees and 90 degrees of flexion, and a combined 7 Nm valgus and 4 Nm internal tibial torque at 30 degrees and 60 degrees of flexion before and after each bundle was selectively cut. The in situ force (N) for each bundle of the ACL was measured. Both intermediate (IM) bundle and postero-lateral (PL) bundle had significantly lower in situ force than the antero-medial (AM) bundle in anterior loading. The IM and PL bundles carried a larger proportion of the force under the torsional loads than the anterior loads. But IM bundle had a significant lower in situ force during the combined torque at 60 degrees of knee flexion, when compared intact ACL. In summary, IM bundle has a subordinate role to the AM and PL bundles. AM bundle is more dominant than IM and PL bundles. The porcine knee is a suitable model for ACL studies, especially for AP stability.
    Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy 09/2009; 18(1):20-5. · 2.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft impingement against the intercondylar roof has been postulated, but not thoroughly investigated. The roof impingement pressure changes with different tibial and femoral tunnel positions in ACL reconstruction. Anterior tibial translation is also affected by the tunnel positions of ACL reconstruction. The study design included a controlled laboratory study. In 15 pig knees, the impingement pressure between ACL and intercondylar roof was measured using pressure sensitive film before and after ACL single bundle reconstruction. ACL reconstructions were performed in each knee with two different tibial and femoral tunnel position combinations: (1) tibial antero-medial (AM) tunnel to femoral AM tunnel (AM to AM) and (2) tibial postero-lateral (PL) tunnel to femoral High-AM tunnel (PL to High-AM). Anterior tibial translation (ATT) was evaluated after each ACL reconstruction using robotic/universal force-moment sensor testing system. Neither the AM to AM nor the PL to High-AM ACL reconstruction groups showed significant difference when compared with intact ACL in roof impingement pressure. The AM to AM group had a significantly higher failure load than PL to High-AM group. This study showed how different tunnel placements affect the ACL-roof impingement pressure and anterior-posterior laxity in ACL reconstruction. Anatomical ACL reconstruction does not cause roof impingement and it has a biomechanical advantage in ATT when compared with non-anatomical ACL reconstructions in the pig knee. There is no intercondylar roof impingement after anatomical single bundle ACL reconstruction.
    Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy 01/2009; 17(6):590-4. · 2.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The indications for the all-inside knot suture technique include tears in the red-red zone or red-white zone in the meniscus, and a horizontal tear, a vertical tear, and a peripheral tear. First, find an appropriate place for a suture insertion site with a Kateran needle or a spinal needle. Make sure it exits beyond the tear in the meniscus. Once the insertion site is chosen, a suture is passed into and through the joint. The suture is slowly pulled back. You should be able to feel the tip of the suture come out of the joint capsule. If you want to make a vertical suture to suture the tear, move the suture vertically apex. Then insert the suture back into the joint through the capsule. Make sure the suture stays inside the joint. Find and grab the suture with a punch inserted from the clear cannula. Pull the suture out of the joint through the clear cannula with the punch. Tighten the knot with a knot pusher. Then confirm the stability of the sutured site with the probe. Our all-inside knot suture technique can be performed arthroscopically, allowing reliable repair of the torn meniscus.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 07/2005; 21(6):768. · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There are many procedures to treat recurrent patellar subluxations and dislocations. Most of these procedures are open repairs for acute conditions or open reconstructions for chronic conditions, and both surgeries need large skin incisions. Although there are many arthroscopic procedures for meniscal and ligament injuries, there are very few arthroscopic procedures described for patellofemoral instability. In this report, we describe a new arthroscopic method to stabilize the patella for acute dislocation. Our technique includes an arthroscopic lateral release and a medial structure repair. We suggest that this procedure is minimally invasive and easier than traditional open procedures. Moreover, this may prevent patients from developing chronic instability of the patellofemoral joint.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 10/2004; 20(7):761-4. · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Muscle injuries are very common in traumatology and sports medicine. Although muscle tissue can regenerate postinjury, the healing process is slow and often incomplete; complete recovery after skeletal muscle injury is hindered by fibrosis. Our studies have shown that decreased fibrosis could improve muscle healing. Suramin has been found to inhibit transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 expression by competitively binding to the growth factor receptor. We conducted a series of tests to determine the antifibrotic effects of suramin on muscle laceration injuries. Our results demonstrate that suramin (50 microg/ml) can effectively decrease fibroblast proliferation and fibrotic-protein expression (alpha-smooth muscle actin) in vitro. In vivo, direct injection of suramin (2.5 mg) into injured murine muscle resulted in effective inhibition of muscle fibrosis and enhanced muscle regeneration, which led to efficient functional muscle recovery. These results support our hypothesis that prevention of fibrosis could enhance muscle regeneration, thereby facilitating more efficient muscle healing. This study could significantly contribute to the development of strategies to promote efficient muscle healing and functional recovery.
    Journal of Applied Physiology 09/2003; 95(2):771-80. · 3.48 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

153 Citations
68 Downloads
1k Views
36.01 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • Nihon University
      • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
      Tokyo, Tokyo-to, Japan
  • 2011
    • Gunma University
      • Department of Rehabilitation Medicine
      Maebashi, Gunma Prefecture, Japan
  • 2009–2010
    • University of Pittsburgh
      • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
      Pittsburgh, PA, United States