Aaron E Katz

Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, New York, United States

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Publications (127)343.03 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To report on biochemical recurrence (BCR) and major complications in patients with prior prostate resection that underwent cryosurgery (CS) for prostate cancer. The Columbia University Urologic Oncology database identified patients that underwent CS after resection. Patient demographics, surgical details, prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, biopsy results, major complications, and BCR were recorded. Prior resection for benign prostatic hyperplasia was identified in 32 patients who underwent CS. Median age was 70.7 years (range 54.9-83.1 years). Median prostate volume before and after resection was 40 (range 30-90) and 20 cm(3) (range 9-54), respectively. Median time from resection to CS was 50.4 months (range 0-178.1 months). Twenty-one (16 full and 5 focal gland ablations) and 11 patients underwent primary and salvage CS, respectively. Median prostate-specific antigen at CS was 5.9 ng/mL (range 0.1-18.4 ng/mL), with a median nadir post-CS of 0.1 ng/mL (range 0.04-12.2 ng/mL). Median follow-up was 41.2 months (range 8.9-154.2 months). According to Stuttgart and Phoenix definitions, 11 and 10 patients, respectively, experienced BCR. Three patients underwent further CS for disease recurrence. Overall complications were rare and minor. Patients with smaller glands postresection (<20 cc(3)) experienced a similar incidence of BCR as those with larger glands after CS in all the settings. Although no patients experienced major complications after primary CS, 18% (2/11) had grade III or higher complications in the salvage setting. Postresection gland volume was not associated with BCR. Further research is needed to evaluate functional and oncological outcomes in postresection patients after CS because they are considered high-risk for major complications.
    Urology 07/2013; · 2.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The use of frameless robotic stereotactic body radiotherapy has not been investigated in patients whose primary cryosurgery treatment failed. The aim of this series was to present initial experiences with frameless robotic radiosurgery in the treatment of local prostate recurrence after cryotherapy. METHODS: We reviewed the outcome of frameless robotic radiosurgery in 4 patients for biopsy-proven local recurrent prostate cancer after cryotherapy. The patients underwent stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) at Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, New York. RESULTS: The patients' ages ranged from 66 to 75 years old. The average follow-up was more than 4 months. Presalvage prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were 7.3, 11.9, 6.1, and 20.9 ng/mL for the four patients. Presalvage Gleason scores were 7, 7, 9, and 8 respectively. One patient had insufficient follow-up for inclusion. The 3 remaining patients showed reduction of PSA levels after SBRT. Follow-up post-SBRT PSA levels were 2.2, 0.19, and 2.0 ng/mL. The average PSA reduction was 7.0 ng/mL. Morbidity at 3-week follow-up included urinary urgency, dysuria, and constipation. There was no change in international prostate symptom score or The International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form scores after SBRT. One patient experienced erectile dysfunction from SBRT. CONCLUSIONS: Initial results indicate that robotic SBRT is a viable option for patients who have failed initial cryosurgery therapy measures. The patients had minimal morbidity with significant reduction in PSA levels.
    Clinical Genitourinary Cancer 10/2012; · 1.43 Impact Factor
  • Sven Wenske, Scott Quarrier, Aaron E Katz
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Salvage cryosurgery (SC) is a recognised option for patients who fail either primary radiation or cryosurgery. OBJECTIVE: To report outcomes of patients undergoing SC. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A consecutive series of 396 patients who had failed either primary radiotherapy or cryosurgery underwent SC between October 1994 and August 2011. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Demographic and clinical parameters before primary and salvage treatment were evaluated; disease-free-survival (DFS), overall-survival (OS), disease-specific-survival (DSS), and complications were assessed. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: Sufficient follow-up data were available for 328 patients. Median age was 65.8 yr (range: 45-81 yr), median serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 8.0 ng/ml (range: 0.6-290.0 ng/ml). After primary treatment, median time to recurrence was 55 mo (range: 0.0-183.6 mo). SC was performed at a median of 67.5 mo (range: 7.0-212.7 mo) later; median pre-SC PSA level was 4.0 ng/ml (range: 0.1-112.4 ng/ml). Median PSA nadir was 0.2 ng/ml (range: 0.01-70.70 ng/ml), reached after a median of 2.6 mo (range: 2.0-67.3 mo) after SC. Median follow-up was 47.8 mo (range: 1.6-203.5 mo). Respective 5- and 10-yr DFS was 63% and 35%; OS: 74% and 45%; and DSS: 91% and 79%. In univariate analyses, time from primary treatment to SC or recurrence, PSA level before SC, and PSA nadir after SC were all significant predictors of recurrence (p ≤ 0.01). PSA before SC and time to recurrence were also predictive of DSS (p=0.003 and p=0.01, respectively). In multivariate analyses, only PSA nadir after SC was predictive of recurrence and DSS (p<0.001 and p=0.012, respectively). Complications were rare (range: 0.6-4.6%). Fifty-five patients (16.7%) underwent focal SC. Median PSA nadir after focal SC was 0.44 ng/ml (range: 0.04-20.1 ng/ml). Twenty-seven patients (49%) experienced recurrence. Respective 5- and 10-yr DFS was 47% and 42%; OS: 87% and 81%; and DSS: 100% and 83%. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis confirms SC as an effective treatment option for patients failing primary therapy. Patients experienced excellent survival outcome and minimal associated morbidity after SC. Focal SC is an efficacious treatment for properly selected patients.
    European Urology 07/2012; · 10.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Various definitions of biochemical failure (BF) have been used to predict cancer recurrence following prostate cryoablation. However to date, none of these definitions have been validated for this use. We have reviewed several definitions of BF to determine their accuracy in predicting biopsy-proven local recurrence following prostate cryoablation. The Columbia University Urologic Oncology Database was queried for patients who underwent prostate cryoablation between 1994 and 2010, and who subsequently underwent surveillance biopsy due to clinical suspicion of prostate cancer recurrence. Serial postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) results were used to determine BF according to various definitions of BF. Biopsy results were used to determine local recurrence. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve area were calculated for each of the BF definitions. A total of 110 patients met inclusion criteria for the study. These patients were treated with primary full-gland (n = 38), primary focal (n = 24), or salvage cryoablation (n = 48). On surveillance biopsy, 66 patients (60%) were found to have locally recurrent prostate cancer. The most accurate BF definition overall was PSA nadir plus 2 ng/ml (Phoenix definition), with sensitivity, specificity, and ROC curve area of 68%, 59%, and 0.64, respectively. Overall, the Phoenix definition best predicted local cancer recurrence following prostate cryoablation. These preliminary data may be useful for researchers evaluating the short-term efficacy of cryoablation, and for urologists assessing their patients for potential cancer recurrence. Prostate 72:1802-1808, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    The Prostate 05/2012; 72(16):1802-8. · 3.84 Impact Factor
  • Philippa J Cheetham, Aaron E Katz
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    ABSTRACT: There is now increasing evidence from epidemiologic surveys and from laboratory, intervention, and case-control studies that diet and lifestyle plays a crucial role in prostate cancer biology and tumorigenesis. This applies to both the development and progression of prostate cancer, although in many cases the specific initiating factors in the diet are poorly understood. Conversely, many nutrients and herbs also show significant promise in helping to treat prostate cancer by slowing progression and reducing recurrence, ultimately reducing the risk of morbidity and mortality from the disease. Furthermore for all grades of prostate cancer, nutritional interventions complement conventional treatment to improve response and quality of life. Slowing or even reversing the progression of, high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia [HGPIN]). with chemo-preventative agents could be the best primary defense against prostate cancer, preventing it from occurring in the first place. The information given in this review about prostate cancer chemoprevention summarizes the key evidence for the role of different dietary components and their effect on prostate cancer prevention and progression. Most nutritional chemoprevention agents also have the added benefit of being beneficial for the cardiovascular system, bone health and for the prevention of other cancers.
    Archivos españoles de urología 10/2011; 64(8):720-34.
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    ABSTRACT: Vitamin D has a well-known role in calcium metabolism and bone health. It may also help prevent a number of chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and malignancies such as breast, colorectal and prostate cancer. To our knowledge the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency has never been reported in the general urological population. We evaluated the vitamin D status of this population at a large academic center. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 3,763 male and female patients from a urology database at a single academic institution. Patients were identified whose levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured for the first time between 1997 and 2010. We determined the prevalence of normal--greater than 30, insufficient--20 to 29 and deficient--less than 20 ng/ml 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for vitamin D deficiency. Overall 2,559 patients (68%) had suboptimal 25-hydroxyvitamin D (less than 30 ng/ml), of whom 1,331 (52%) were frankly deficient (less than 20 ng/ml) in the vitamin. Vitamin D deficiency was more common in patients younger than age 50 years (44.5%), black (53.2%) and Hispanic (41.6%) patients (p <0.001), and patients without an existing urological malignancy (35.4%, p <0.001). On multivariate analysis race, age, season and cancer diagnosis were independent predictors of vitamin D status. Vitamin D deficiency is extremely common in urological patients at a major urban medical center. Urologists should consider recommending appropriate supplementation during the initial assessment of all patients.
    The Journal of urology 08/2011; 186(4):1395-9. · 3.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Interference of androgen receptor (AR) signaling is a target for prostate cancer (CaP) chemoprevention and treatment. We hypothesize that Zyflamend (ZYF) assert its anti-cancer effect by disrupting AR signaling. We also hypothesize that it may act synergistically with the anti-androgen bicalutimde to inhibit CaP cell growth. Western blotting, ELISA and reporter assays were done to test ZYF on AR signaling. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and AR half-life were also examined. Potential synergism between ZYF and bicalutimide were tested via cytotoxicity, colony formation assays, flow cytometry, and Western blotting in the human CAP line, LNCaP and 22RV1. ZYF reduced AR protein, mRNA and protein stability levels in LNCaPs. ZYF also reduced both full-length AR protein and truncated AR protein in the 22Rv1 cell line. Nkx3.1 and PSA were also reduced at the mRNA level. PSA promoter activity and secretion were lower after treatment of cells with ZYF. DHT induction of cell proliferation and AR responsiveness revealed reduction of AR, Nkx3.1, and PSA protein were demonstrated with ZYF treatment. Co-treatment with bicalutimide reducing cell growth, induced apoptosis, and reduced Bcl-2 and BclxL, caspase-3 and PARP. Co-treatment also reduced Nkx3.1 and PSA protein. These data indicate that ZYF suppresses cell growth mediated by AR signaling, and suggests that the co-treatment with the anti-androgen bicalutimide and ZYF may be a promising approach for cancer therapy and may demonstrate the mechanism of action of ZYF.
    The Prostate 06/2011; 72(3):244-52. · 3.84 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Aaron E Katz, Jillian L Capodice
    European Urology 06/2011; 59(6):1066. · 10.48 Impact Factor
  • The Journal of Urology 04/2011; 185(4). · 3.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We followed two subjects with resected stage Ta superficial transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder who had not received intravesicle bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and received supplementation with the agent Genistein Combined Polysaccharide (GCP) in an IRB approved study. The observation period was 12 months for both cases. After the yearly oral dosage of GCP, there was no recurrence in either of the subjects as determined by cytoscopy, urine cytology, and fluorescence in-situ hybridization analysis of urine (UrovysionTM FISH Assay). The intravenous pyelogram (IVP), obtained at baseline and after 12 months, was also negative. There were no adverse events over the course of treatment and had full patient compliance and tolerability of the GCP agent in both cases.
    Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine 01/2011; 8(1).
  • Source
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To test the safety and efficacy of acupuncture in reducing hot flashes in men with advanced prostate cancer (CaP) undergoing androgen deprivation therapy. METHODS: A single-arm, pilot study was undertaken to evaluate acupuncture treatment for hot flashes experienced by CaP patients undergoing hormonal therapy. Sixteen advanced CaP patients undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) received standardized full body and auricular acupunc-ture 1x/week for 14 weeks. Patients were evaluated at 0, 7, 14, and an additional 14-wk follow-up (F/U) (28-wks). Safety was measured by monitoring for adverse events over the treatment period. Serum testosterone was measured at 0 and 14-wks. Quality of life (QOL) was measured by the hormone domain of the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC), at the 0, 7, 14, and 28-wks and patient reported hot flash frequency was assessed weekly. Safety endpoints were serum testosterone and analysis of adverse events. Efficacy endpoints were scores on the EPIC and the number of pa-tient reported hot flashes. RESULTS: 17 patients were enrolled and 15 completed the trial. Of 15 evaluable patients the median age was 68 ± 8.19. Serum analysis demonstrated no change in testosterone at baseline 9.5 ng/ml ± 8.9 vs. end-point 14 ± 8.78 (p = 0.101). No adverse events were reported. Data analysis of the EPIC demonstrated a trend toward improvement after 7 wks and a significant improvement following 14 wks of acupuncture (p = 0.01). Analysis of patient reported frequency showed a significant reduction in the number of hot flashes at 7-wk (6, p = 0.04), 14-wk (2.6, p = 0.001), and 28-wk F/U (3.2, p = 0.01) as compared to baseline 9.57 ± 3.98. CONCLUSIONS: The administration of acupuncture in men with advanced CaP appears to significantly decrease the frequency of hot flashes. No serious ad-verse events were noted and serum testosterone levels were unchanged from baseline suggesting that the mechanism of action of acupuncture for hot flash amelioration is not via increase in testosterone.
    International Journal of Clinical Medicine. 01/2011; 2:51-55.
  • European Urology Supplements - EUR UROL SUPPL. 01/2011; 10(2):240-240.
  • Aaron E. Katz, Philippa J. Cheetham
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There is now increasing evidence from epidemiologic surveys and from laboratory, intervention, and case-control studies that diet and lifestyle plays a crucial role in prostate cancer biology and tumorigenesis. This applies to both the development and progression of prostate cancer, although in many cases the specific initiating factors in the diet are poorly understood. Conversely, many nutrients and herbs also show significant promise in helping to treat prostate cancer by slowing progression and reducing recurrence, ultimately reducing the risk of morbidity and mortality from the disease. Furthermore for all grades of prostate cancer, nutritional interventions complement conventional treatment to improve response and quality of life. Slowing or even reversing the progression of, high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia [HGPIN]). with chemo-preventative agents could be the best primary defense against prostate cancer, preventing it from occurring in the first place. The information given in this review about prostate cancer chemoprevention summarizes the key evidence for the role of different dietary components and their effect on prostate cancer prevention and progression. Most nutritional chemopreven-tion agents also have the added benefit of being beneficial for the cardiovascular system, bone health and for the prevention of other cancers.
    Archivos españoles de urología 01/2011; 64(8):720-736.
  • Journal of Urology - J UROL. 01/2011; 185(4).
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    ABSTRACT: Ten-year disease-specific survival for clinically localized prostate cancer after radiation is 93%, 88%, and 80% for low-, medium-, and high-risk groups, respectively. The objective of this study was to report long-term cancer survival outcomes for patients who had undergone prostate cryotherapy at our institution more than 10 years ago. To date, this is the longest reported follow-up after cryotherapy. A retrospective patient chart review, conducted of an Institutional Review Board (IRB)- approved cryotherapy database, identified 76 men who had undergone prostate cryotherapy before January 1999. Pre-, intra-, and posttreatment data were collected. Primary study endpoints were overall mortality and prostate-cancer-specific death. Secondary endpoints were disease recurrence and clinical progression. Mean patient age was 69.2 (47.4-86.3) years; median preoperative prostate-specific antigen was 5.3 (0.2-208.0); mean Gleason score was 7. Forty of 76 (52.6%) were confirmed D'Amico high risk. Median follow-up was 10.1 (0.2-14.9) years; 25 patients underwent primary treatment; 51 postradiation. After 10 years of follow-up, 43 of 76 men (56.6%) were still alive; 33 men (43.4%) had died-10 (13.2%) from prostate cancer, 18 (22.4%) from noncancerous causes, and 5 (6.6%) unknown. The long-term results of prostate cryotherapy in our series indicate an 87% overall 10-year prostate-cancer-specific survival, despite early cryotherapy technology and the majority of patients being D'Amico high risk.
    Journal of endourology / Endourological Society 07/2010; 24(7):1123-9. · 1.75 Impact Factor
  • Jun Yan, Aaron E Katz
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    ABSTRACT: The anticancer effects of ProstaCaid, a novel integrative blend of vitamins, minerals, multiherb extracts, and derivatives, were tested in human and mouse androgen-dependent (AD) and -independent (AI) prostate cancer cell lines. ProstaCaid shows growth inhibitory effects on both human and mouse AD prostate cancer cells (LNCaP and CASP 2.1) and AI prostate cancer cells (PC3 and CASP 1.1) in a dose-/time-dependent manner. Consistently, long-term treatment with ProstaCaid also reduced colony formation capacities of prostate cancer cells. Flow cytometry assays revealed that ProstaCaid induces G2/M arrest and apoptosis in LNCaP and PC3 cells after 72 hours of treatment. Immunoblotting assay demonstrated that 25 microg/mL of ProstaCaid treatment resulted in (1) the reduction of cyclin D1, cyclin B1, and Cdc2 expression in a time-dependent way; (2) increase in p21(WAF1/Cip1) as early as 12 hours after the treatments in PC3 cells and reduction to base line at the 72-hour time point; and (3) repression of Bcl-2, BclxL, and induction of Bim as well as the cleavages of caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) at 72 hours of treatment, suggesting caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Moreover, ProstaCaid suppressed activation of AKT and MAPK signaling pathways in PC3 and LNCaP cells by reducing phosphorylation levels of AKT, its downstream target S6 ribosomal protein and GSK3beta, and ERK1/2, respectively. In summary, these findings strongly suggest that ProstaCaid may be a potential chemopreventive and therapeutic agent for both AD and, more importantly, AI prostate cancer.
    Integrative Cancer Therapies 06/2010; 9(2):186-96. · 2.35 Impact Factor
  • The Journal of Urology 04/2010; 183(4). · 3.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Focal cryoablation targets unilateral disease, sparing healthy tissue and the ipsilateral neurovascular bundle. Given half the prostate is spared, proper patient selection is imperative to optimize outcomes. We report focal cryotherapy outcome data and evaluate the accuracy of the 2007 Task Force patient selection criteria at predicting disease recurrence. This is a retrospective patient chart review from a single academic institution. Inclusion criterion is having unilateral prostate cancer treated with primary hemicryoablation. Patients were stratified using the Task Force selection criteria. Exclusion criterion is having had past radiation or hormone therapy. Progression-free survival was calculated using follow-up TRUS biopsy (biopsy done with transrectal ultrasound) and serial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) results (Phoenix criteria). Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed and Cox regression analyses performed, comparing outcomes across patient selection cohorts. From 2002 to 2009, 77 men underwent primary focal cryosurgery: mean age, 69.5 (SD, 6.7) years; median follow-up time, 24 months (range, 0-87 months); mean precryosurgical PSA, 6.5 (SD, 4.9) ng/mL; median Gleason score, 6 (range, 5-8). There were 44, 31, and 2 men who had D'Amico low-, intermediate-, and high-risk disease, respectively. Seventeen men met Focal Task Force Selection Criteria. After treatment, 22 patients underwent prostate biopsy for suspicion of recurrent disease. Of the 22 patients, 10 (45.5%) had confirmed prostate cancer. Of the 10 patients, 2 had ipsilateral disease, 7 had contralateral disease, and 1 had bilateral disease. Overall biochemical and pathological progression-free survival rates were 72.7% and 87%. The cumulative incidence of biochemical disease progression, using the Kaplan-Meier method, was greater than 75% at 3 years for men with more than 2 positive preoperative biopsy cores and greater than 50% at 5 years for men with 2 or less positive preoperative biopsy cores. No survival differences were seen across cohorts. Pretreatment PSA level, pretreatment Gleason score, number positive cores, and total tumor length were associated with disease progression. Focal cryotherapy is a promising option for carefully selected patients, although optimization of inclusion criteria is required. Current selection criteria are associated with cancer-free survival. Given no accurate definitions for biochemical failure after focal cryotherapy exist combined with our high biochemical failure rate, mandating 12-month follow-up TRUS biopsy may improve accurate detection of cancer progression. Further follow up will determine optimal patient selection criteria and follow-up protocols for patients undergoing primary focal unilateral nerve-sparing prostate cancer treatment.
    The Cancer Journal 01/2010; 16(5):544-9. · 3.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To gather a pooled database from six tertiary-care referral centres using salvage cryotherapy (SC) for locally recurrent prostate cancer, and develop a pretreatment nomogram allowing a prediction of the probability of biochemical failure after SC, based on pretreatment clinical variables. We retrospectively analysed 797 men treated at six tertiary-care referral centres with SC for locally recurrent disease after primary radiotherapy with curative intent. The median duration of follow-up from the time of SC to the date of last contact was 3.4 years. The primary study endpoint was biochemical failure, defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level after SC of >0.5 ng/mL. Overall, the rate of biochemical failure was 66% with a median of 3.4 years of follow-up. A logistic regression model was used to predict biochemical failure. Covariates included serum PSA level at diagnosis, initial clinical T stage, and initial biopsy Gleason score. On the basis of these results, a pretreatment nomogram was developed which can be used to help select patients best suited for SC. Our pretreatment nomogram was internally validated using 500 bootstrap samples, with the concordance index of the model being 0.70. A pretreatment nomogram based on several diagnostic variables (serum PSA level at diagnosis, biopsy Gleason grade, and initial clinical T stage) was developed and might allow the selection of ideal candidates for SC.
    BJU International 11/2009; 106(2):194-8. · 3.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in men due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) or chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) are difficult for both the patient and the clinician. In office prostatic massage has been documented to provide symptom relief but use of at-home massage has not been determined. We performed a retrospective analysis of data from men utilizing an at-home-use prostate device to examine disease, treatment characteristics, and symptom relief in order to ascertain whether evidence exists to perform a clinical trial. Methods: Data on 154 consecutive men was reviewed and subjects evaluated in two Groups, BPH w/ LUTS (Group 1) and CP/CPPS w/ LUTS (Group 2). All subjects completed the National Institutes of Health, Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (CPSI) at baseline and follow-up. Demographics, scores on the CPSI, duration of device use, self-reported symptom assessment, and comments were analyzed. Results: Of 154 men, 115 were analyzed. Of the 115, 90 (78.3%) were in Group 1 (BPH w/LUTS) and 25 (21.7%) were in Group 2 (CP/CPPS w/LUTS). The average age was 64.48 years ± 10.86 (average ± SD) vs 46.68 ± 12.5 (Group 1 - 2, respectively). In Group 1 total CPSI score from baseline to follow-up were (11.61 ± 7.07 (mean ± SD) - 6.63 ± 5.20, p = 0.0001). In Group 2 total scores from baseline to follow-up were (16.67 ± 7.0 vs 11.48 ± 5.84 (5.20, p = 0.0127). Other self-reported comments included 16/115 (13.9%) of subjects unsure about proper use/application and 10/115 (8.6%) reporting rectal soreness. Conclusions: The preliminary findings suggest that a clinical trial of a novel at-home-use prostatic massage device is warranted.
    The Open Urology & Nephrology Journal 10/2009; 2(1).

Publication Stats

3k Citations
343.03 Total Impact Points

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Institutions

  • 2012
    • Winthrop University Hospital
      Mineola, New York, United States
  • 1999–2012
    • New York Presbyterian Hospital
      • Department of Urology
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1990–2012
    • Columbia University
      • • Department of Urology
      • • College of Physicians and Surgeons
      New York City, NY, United States
  • 2011
    • Nanjing University
      • Model Animal Research Center
      Nanjing, Jiangsu Sheng, China
  • 1996–2011
    • New York University
      • Department of Urology
      New York City, NY, United States
  • 2008
    • University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
      • Department of Urology
      Houston, TX, United States
  • 1994–2007
    • CUNY Graduate Center
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2000
    • Devry College of New York, USA
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1989
    • Maimonides Medical Center
      Brooklyn, New York, United States