B D Clarkson

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, New York, United States

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Publications (227)1396.04 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Activating mutations in the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase are associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Imatinib inhibits Kit and is front-line therapy for GIST. However, imatinib most often elicits a partial response or stable disease, and most GIST patients who initially respond to imatinib eventually acquire resistance. Thus, improved treatment strategies for GIST are needed. We investigated the role of Src family kinases (SFK) in tumorigenesis in a mouse model of human GIST. The SFKs Src and Lyn were active in GIST, and surprisingly, imatinib treatment stimulated their phosphorylation/activation. We show that integrin signaling activates focal adhesion kinase and, consequently, SFKs in GIST and that imatinib enhances integrin signaling, implying a role for the extracellular matrix and integrin signaling in tumor maintenance and imatinib resistance. Dasatinib, an inhibitor of SFKs and Kit, inhibited SFK and focal adhesion kinase activation in GIST but also inhibited Kit and Kit-dependent downstream signaling pathways including phosphoinositide 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase, but not signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling. Whereas dasatinib and imatinib alone both produced a minimal histopathologic response, combination therapy improved their efficacy, leading to increased necrosis in GIST. These results highlight the importance of SFK and STAT signaling in GIST and suggest that the clinical efficacy of imatinib may be limited by the stimulation of integrin signaling.
    Molecular Cancer Research 09/2010; 8(9):1271-83. · 4.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors have improved survival in advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), complete response is rare and most patients eventually fail the first-line treatment with imatinib. Sunitinib malate is the only approved second-line therapy for patients with imatinib-resistant or imatinib-intolerant GIST. The clinical benefit of sunitinib is genotype-dependent in regards to both primary and secondary mutations, with GIST patients harboring the KIT(AY502-3ins) exon 9 mutation being the most sensitive. As sunitinib resistance is now emerging, our goal was to investigate mechanisms of progression and to test the efficacy of novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor on these resistant mutants in vitro. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis of Ba/F3 cells expressing the KIT(AY502-3ins) mutant was used to investigate novel patterns of resistant mutations evolving in the presence of sunitinib. Tumors from patients who developed sunitinib resistance after at least 1 year of radiographic response were analyzed, showing similar findings of a primary KIT(AY502-3ins) mutation and a secondary mutation in the KIT activation loop. Ba/F3 cells expressing these sunitinib-resistant double mutants showed sensitivity to both dasatinib and nilotinib. Sunitinib resistance in GIST shares similar pathogenetic mechanisms identified in imatinib failure, with acquisition of secondary mutations in the activation domain after an extended initial response to the drug. Moreover, in vitro mutagenesis with or without N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea of Ba/F3 cells expressing KIT(AY502-3ins) showed acquisition of secondary mutations restricted to the second kinase domain of KIT. In contrast, in vitro resistance to imatinib produces a broader spectrum of secondary mutations including mutations in both KIT kinase domains.
    Clinical Cancer Research 10/2009; 15(22):6862-70. · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) of a series of novel pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-one compounds as potent Abl kinase inhibitors. We evaluate their specificity profile against a panel of human recombinant kinases, as well as their biological profile toward a panel of well-characterized cancer cell lines. Our study reveals that substitutions in the 3- and 4-positions of the phenylamino moiety lead to improved potency and improved selectivity both in target-based and cell-based assays. Altogether, our results provide an insight into the SAR of pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-ones for the development of drug candidates with improved potency and selectivity for the targeted treatment of CML.
    Bioorganic & medicinal chemistry letters 10/2009; 19(24):6872-6. · 2.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Imatinib mesylate induces complete cytogenetic responses in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), yet many patients have detectable BCR-ABL transcripts in peripheral blood even after prolonged therapy. Bone marrow studies have shown that this residual disease resides within the stem cell compartment. Quiescence of leukemic stem cells has been suggested as a mechanism conferring insensitivity to imatinib, and exposure to the Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF), together with imatinib, has led to a significant reduction in leukemic stem cells in vitro. In this paper, we design a novel mathematical model of stem cell quiescence to investigate the treatment response to imatinib and G-CSF. We find that the addition of G-CSF to an imatinib treatment protocol leads to observable effects only if the majority of leukemic stem cells are quiescent; otherwise it does not modulate the leukemic cell burden. The latter scenario is in agreement with clinical findings in a pilot study administering imatinib continuously or intermittently, with or without G-CSF (GIMI trial). Furthermore, our model predicts that the addition of G-CSF leads to a higher risk of resistance since it increases the production of cycling leukemic stem cells. Although the pilot study did not include enough patients to draw any conclusion with statistical significance, there were more cases of progression in the experimental arms as compared to continuous imatinib. Our results suggest that the additional use of G-CSF may be detrimental to patients in the clinic.
    PLoS Computational Biology 09/2009; 5(9):e1000503. · 4.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the usefulness of 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-HC) and Etoposide (VP-16) as a purging agent for myeloma cells in bone marrow ex-vivo, myeloma cell lines (SK-RCS-1, RPMI-8226), lymphoma cell line (SK-DHL-2) and normal bone marrow (BM) cells were treated at different concentrations of 4-HC, VP-16. In separate experiments, LAK cells or antibodies were also used to treat the above cell lines. Clonogenic tumor cells from all three cell lines could be reduced by more than 4 logs, when treated alone or as a mixture with irradiated normal bone marrow cells at a 4-HC concentration of 60 μmol/l. Under similar conditions, approximately 1% of normal BM myeloid progenitor granulocyte-macrophage colony forming cells (CFU-GM) survived. The results with LAK cells and antibodies were also encouraging. These observations support the use of various purging methods for myeloma cells for autologous bone marrow transplantation.
    European Journal Of Haematology 04/2009; 43(S51):164 - 172. · 2.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Regulated phosphorylation by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), such as c-Abl, is critical to cellular homeostasis. In turn, once deregulated as in the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) fusion protein Bcr-Abl, PTKs can promote cancer onset and progression. The dramatic success of the Bcr-Abl inhibitor imatinib as therapy for CML has inspired interest in other PTKs as targets for cancer drug discovery. Here we report a novel PTK activity and inhibition screening method using hydrogel-immobilized peptide substrates. Using acrylate crosslinkers, we tether peptides via terminal cysteines to thiol-presenting hydrogels in 96-well plates. These surfaces display low background and high reproducibility, allowing semiquantitative detection of peptide phosphorylation by recombinant c-Abl or by Bcr-Abl activity in cell extracts using traditional anti-phosphotyrosine immunodetection and chemifluorescence. The capabilities of this assay are demonstrated by performing model screens for inhibition with several commercially available PTK inhibitors and a collection of pyridopyrimidine Src/Abl dual inhibitors. This assay provides a practical method to measure the activity of a single kinase present in a whole cell lysate with high sensitivity and specificity as a valuable means for efficient small molecule screening.
    Analytical Biochemistry 05/2008; 375(1):18-26. · 2.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Persistently activated or tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3) is found in 50% of lung adenocarcinomas. pSTAT3 is found in primary adenocarcinomas and cell lines harboring somatic-activating mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR. Treatment of cell lines with either an EGFR inhibitor or an src kinase inhibitor had no effect on pSTAT3 levels, whereas a pan-JAK inhibitor (P6) blocked activation of STAT3 and inhibited tumorigenesis. Cell lines expressing these persistently activated mutant EGFRs also produced high IL-6 levels, and blockade of the IL-6/gp130/JAK pathway led to a decrease in pSTAT3 levels. In addition, reduction of IL-6 levels by RNA interference led to a decrease in tumorigenesis. Introduction of persistently activated EGFR into immortalized breast epithelial cells led to tumorigenesis, IL-6 expression, and STAT3 activation, all of which could be inhibited with P6 or gp130 blockade. Furthermore, inhibition of EGFR activity in multiple cell lines partially blocked transcription of IL-6 and concurrently decreased production and release of IL-6. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis revealed a positive correlation between pSTAT3 and IL-6 positivity in primary lung adenocarcinomas. Therefore, mutant EGFR could activate the gp130/JAK/STAT3 pathway by means of IL-6 upregulation in primary human lung adenocarcinomas, making this pathway a potential target for cancer treatment.
    Journal of Clinical Investigation 01/2008; 117(12):3846-56. · 12.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tyrosine kinases often play pivotal roles in the pathogenesis of cancer and are good candidates for therapeutic intervention and targeted molecular imaging. The precursor synthesis, radiosynthesis, and biological characterization of a fluorine-18 analog of dasatinib, a multitargeted kinase inhibitor, are reported. Compound 5 potently inhibits Abl, Src, and Kit kinases and inhibits K562 and M07e/p210bcr-abl human leukemic cell growth. Using positron emission tomography, we visualized K562 tumor xenografts in mice with [18F]-5.
    Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 12/2007; 50(23):5853-7. · 5.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Resistance is commonly acquired in patients with metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor who are treated with imatinib mesylate, often due to the development of secondary mutations in the KIT kinase domain. We sought to investigate the efficacy of second-line tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as sorafenib, dasatinib, and nilotinib, against the commonly observed imatinib-resistant KIT mutations (KIT(V654A), KIT(T670I), KIT(D820Y), and KIT(N822K)) expressed in the Ba/F3 cellular system. In vitro drug screening of stable Ba/F3 KIT mutants recapitulating the genotype of imatinib-resistant patients harboring primary and secondary KIT mutations was investigated. Comparison was made to imatinib-sensitive Ba/F3 KIT mutant cells as well as Ba/F3 cells expressing only secondary KIT mutations. The efficacy of drug treatment was evaluated by proliferation and apoptosis assays, in addition to biochemical inhibition of KIT activation. Sorafenib was potent against all imatinib-resistant Ba/F3 KIT double mutants tested, including the gatekeeper secondary mutation KIT(WK557-8del/T670I), which was resistant to other kinase inhibitors. Although all three drugs tested decreased cell proliferation and inhibited KIT activation against exon 13 (KIT(V560del/V654A)) and exon 17 (KIT(V559D/D820Y)) double mutants, nilotinib did so at lower concentrations. Our results emphasize the need for tailored salvage therapy in imatinib-refractory gastrointestinal stromal tumors according to individual molecular mechanisms of resistance. The Ba/F3 KIT(WK557-8del/T670I) cells were sensitive only to sorafenib inhibition, whereas nilotinib was more potent on imatinib-resistant KIT(V560del/V654A) and KIT(V559D/D820Y) mutant cells than dasatinib and sorafenib.
    Clinical Cancer Research 09/2007; 13(16):4874-81. · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Activating mutations in either BRAF or NRAS are seen in a significant number of malignant melanomas, but their incidence appears to be dependent to ultraviolet light exposure. Thus, BRAF mutations have the highest incidence in non-chronic sun damaged (CSD), and are uncommon in acral, mucosal and CSD melanomas. More recently, activating KIT mutations have been described in rare cases of metastatic melanoma, without further reference to their clinical phenotypes. This finding is intriguing since KIT expression is downregulated in most melanomas progressing to more aggressive lesions. In this study, we investigated a group of anal melanomas for the presence of BRAF, NRAS, KIT and PDGFRA mutations. A heterozygous KIT exon 11 L576P substitution was identified in 3 of 20 cases tested. The 3 KIT mutation-carrying tumors were strongly immunopositive for KIT protein. No KIT mutations were identified in tumors with less than 4+ KIT immunostaining. NRAS mutation was identified in one tumor. No BRAF or PDGFRA mutations were identified in either KIT positive or negative anal melanomas. In vitro drug testing of stable transformant Ba/F3 KIT(L576P) mutant cells showed sensitivity for dasatinib (previously known as BMS-354825), a dual SRC/ABL kinase inhibitor, and imatinib. However, compared to an imatinib-sensitive KIT mutant, dasatinib was potent at lower doses than imatinib in the KIT(L576P) mutant. These results suggest that a subset of anal melanomas show activating KIT mutations, which are susceptible for therapy with specific kinase inhibitors.
    International Journal of Cancer 08/2007; 121(2):257-64. · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cytofluorographic analysis of surface immunoglobulin (sIg) light chain clonal excess (CE), defined as (%kappa+ - %lambda+)/(%kappa+ + %lambda+) cells per discrete level of fluorescence intensity, was carried out on mononuclear cells of 32 leukemic patients. Eight demonstrated sIg light chain CE, including four blastic chronic myeloid leukemias (BL-CML), three "null" acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALL), and one leukemic lymphoblastic lymphoma. Six of the leukemias demonstrated a kappa CE and two had a lambda CE. Sorted kappa+ PB cells from a BL-CML patient were shown to have a diploid DNA stem line and to bear the "common" ALL antigen. To provide further support for our finding of the expression of sIg light chains in ALL, we studied the REH cell line, derived from a "common" ALL patient and found cytoplasmic mu heavy chain and surface Ig lambda CE. Nucleic acid blotting experiments on REH revealed that both kappa genes had been deleted and that lambda genes had been rearranged, as expected in B cells expressing lambda light chains. Moreover, REH cells contained mu and lambda RNA. When REH cells were treated with TPA the amount of mu chain RNA increased by approximately fivefold and the amount of lambda chain RNA increased by approximately twofold. The finding of sIg light chain in pre-B cell leukemias and in the REH cell line, suggests that these leukemic cells are further differentiated along the B-cell lineage than was previously believed.
    Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 12/2006; 468(1):211 - 226. · 4.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Phosphorylation by the constitutively activated BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase is associated with the pathogenesis of the human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). It is difficult to characterize kinase response to stimuli or drug treatment because regulatory phosphorylation events are largely transient changes affecting low abundance proteins. Stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) has emerged as a pivotal technology for quantitative proteomics. By metabolically labeling proteins with light or heavy tyrosine, we are able to quantify the change in phosphorylation of BCR-ABL kinase and its substrates in response to drug treatment in human CML cells. In this study, we observed that BCR-ABL kinase is phosphorylated at tyrosines 393 and 644, and that SH2-domain containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP)-2 and downstream of kinase (Dok)-2 are phosphorylated at tyrosine 1135 and 299, respectively. Based on the relative intensity of isotopic peptide pairs, we demonstrate that the level of phosphorylation of BCR-ABL kinase as well as SHIP-2 and Dok-2 is reduced approximately 90% upon treatment with Imatinib, a specific inhibitor of BCR-ABL kinase. Furthermore, proteins, such as SHIP-1, SH2-containing protein (SHC) and Casitas B-lineage lymphoma proto-oncogene (CBL), are also regulated by Imatinib. These results demonstrate the simplicity and utility of SILAC as a method to quantify dynamic changes in phosphorylation at specific sites in response to stimuli or drug treatment in cell culture.
    PROTEOMICS 09/2006; 6(16):4554-64. · 4.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mutation in the ABL kinase domain is the principal mechanism of imatinib resistance in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia. Many mutations favor active kinase conformations that preclude imatinib binding. Because the active forms of ABL and SRC resemble one another, we tested two dual SRC-ABL kinase inhibitors, AP23464 and PD166326, against 58 imatinib-resistant (IM(R)) BCR/ABL kinase variants. Both compounds potently inhibit most IM(R) variants, and in vitro drug selection demonstrates that active (AP23464) and open (PD166326) conformation-specific compounds are less susceptible to resistance than imatinib. Combinations of inhibitors suppressed essentially all resistance mutations, with the notable exception of T315I. Guided by mutagenesis studies and molecular modeling, we designed a series of AP23464 analogues to target T315I. The analogue AP23846 inhibited both native and T315I variants of BCR/ABL with submicromolar potency but showed nonspecific cellular toxicity. Our data illustrate how conformational dynamics of the ABL kinase accounts for the activity of dual SRC-ABL inhibitors against IM(R)-mutants and provides a rationale for combining conformation specific inhibitors to suppress resistance.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 07/2006; 103(24):9244-9. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To achieve a high percentage of durable complete remissions (CR) and prolonged survivals and reduce toxicity in patients with early-stage and intermediate-stage Hodgkin's disease, a randomized trial of four cycles of mech-Iorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (MOPP) versus four cycles of thiotepa, bleomycin, and vinblastine (TBV) combined with regional radiation therapy (RT) was conducted. For MOPP and RT, the CR percentage was 98% (60 of 61), and at 5 years, the percentage of patients in CR was 90%, with freedom from progression of 89% and overall survival of 91%. For TBV and RT, the CR percentage was 93% (55 of 59), with a 5-year duration of CR of 83%, freedom from progression of 81%, and overall survival of 91% (P > 0.15). The median follow-up was 65 months (range, 7 to 96 months). For 27 patients with clinical Stage IIIA, the CR percentage for MOPP and RT was 75% (12 of 16), with 1 relapse and 4 deaths. For TBV and RT, the CR percentage for clinical Stage IIIA was 73% (8 of 11) with 2 relapses and 2 deaths. Short-term toxicity except for transient leukopenia was less for TBV and RT than for MOPP and RT. Good results are achievable with combined treatment without excessive toxicity. Cancer 1992; 69:1052–1060.
    Cancer 06/2006; 69(4):1052 - 1060. · 5.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Spontaneous rosette formation with sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) was studied in the peripheral blood and bone marrow lymphoid cells from a patient whose leukemic cells appeared to be T-lymphocytes. Simultaneous morphological examination of the peripheral blood white cells indicated that they consisted of 21% lymphoblasts; 26% prolymphocytes and 48% mature lymphocytes. The distribution of bone marrow cells within the cell cycle was determined by flow microfluorometry and 7 hours after treatment with vincristine consisted of 69% in G1, 21% in S, and 9% in mitosis. Since virtually all the cells both in marrow and blood formed rosettes with SRBC this implies that the expression of this T cell marker is independent both of the morphological appearance of these cells and their position within the cell cycle.
    Cancer 06/2006; 39(3):1101 - 1104. · 5.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Twenty-three adult patients (ages greater than 15 years) and 75 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were treated with similar intensive, sequential cytotoxic protocols (L-2). The adult patients have a lower remission rate (78%) than the children (98%). The duration of remission and the length of survival are also shorter in adults. The incidence of central nervous system (CNS) relapse in adults (27.7%) is higher than in children (7.1%) suggesting that prolonged prophylactic intrathecal methotrexate as given to the children is more effective than the schedule used for adults where intrathecal methotrexate was given only in the first 2 months of therapy. The low incidence of CNS involvement in children on the L-2 protocol compares favorably with other series reported using a combination of cranial irradiation and intrathecal methotrexate. In both adults and children there seemed to be a higher incidence of CNS involvement in patients with initial white blood cell counts greater than 25,000 cells/mm3.
    Cancer 06/2006; 37(3):1256 - 1264. · 5.20 Impact Factor
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    Cancer 06/2006; 16(5):567 - 582. · 5.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Targeted cancer therapies exploit the continued dependence of cancer cells on oncogenic mutations. Such agents can have remarkable activity against some cancers, although antitumor responses are often heterogeneous, and resistance remains a clinical problem. To gain insight into factors that influence the action of a prototypical targeted drug, we studied the action of imatinib (STI-571, Gleevec) against murine cells and leukemias expressing BCR-ABL, an imatinib target and the initiating oncogene for human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We show that the tumor suppressor p53 is selectively activated by imatinib in BCR-ABL-expressing cells as a result of BCR-ABL kinase inhibition. Inactivation of p53, which can accompany disease progression in human CML, impedes the response to imatinib in vitro and in vivo without preventing BCR-ABL kinase inhibition. Concordantly, p53 mutations are associated with progression to imatinib resistance in some human CMLs. Our results identify p53 as a determinant of the response to oncogene inhibition and suggest one way in which resistance to targeted therapy can emerge during the course of tumor evolution.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 06/2006; 103(19):7444-9. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The pyridopyrimidinones are a potent class of inhibitors of c-Abl kinase and Bcr-Abl kinase, the causative fusion protein in chronic myelogenous leukemia and Src family kinases. A novel method for routine, high-yield no-carrier-added synthesis of [(124)I]-, [(125)I]- and [(131)I]-6-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-2-(4-iodophenylamino)-8-methyl-8H-pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-one has been developed. The 4'-trimethylstannyl- or 4'-tri-n-butylstannyl-pyridopyrimidinone precursors were prepared from the aryl bromide via a palladium-mediated coupling with hexaalkylditin (dioxane/microwave irradiation/10 min at 160 degrees C). The radioiodination of 4'-stannylpyridopyrimidinones was found to optimally occur via an iododestannylation with Na(124)I, Na(125)I or Na(131)I in the presence of an oxidant [30% H(2)O(2)/HOAc (1:3)/10 min] in 79-87% radiochemical yield with >99% radiochemical purity. The total radiosynthesis time was 30 min. The 4-iodophenylpyridopyrimidinone 2 inhibited recombinant Abl kinase activity with an IC(50) of 2.0 nM. Cell proliferation of K562 and A431 cells was inhibited with an IC(50) of 2.0 and 20 nM, respectively. Rapid cellular uptake and equilibrium were observed within 10-15 min using [(131)I]-4-iodophenylpyridopyrimidinone 6c in K562 and A431 cells and demonstrated a 2.8-fold uptake selectivity for the Bcr-Abl-expressing K562 cells at 60 min. These results suggest that pyridopyrimidinone radiotracers may be useful in imaging Abl-, Bcr-Abl- or Src-expressing malignancies.
    Nuclear Medicine and Biology 06/2005; 32(4):313-21. · 2.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Imatinib mesylate is highly effective in newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but BCR/ABL (breakpoint cluster region/abelson murine leukemia)-positive progenitors persist in most patients with CML treated with imatinib mesylate, indicating the need for novel therapeutic approaches. In this study, we have used the murine CML-like myeloproliferative disorder as a platform to characterize the pharmacokinetic, signal transduction, and antileukemic properties of PD166326, one of the most potent members of the pyridopyrimidine class of protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In mice with the CML-like disease, PD166326 rapidly inhibited Bcr/Abl kinase activity after a single oral dose and demonstrated marked antileukemic activity in vivo. Seventy percent of PD166326-treated mice achieved a white blood cell (WBC) count less than 20.0 x 10(9)/L (20,000/microL) at necropsy, compared with only 8% of imatinib mesylate-treated animals. Further, two thirds of PD166326-treated animals had complete resolution of splenomegaly, compared with none of the imatinib mesylate-treated animals. Consistent with its more potent antileukemic effect in vivo, PD166326 was also superior to imatinib mesylate in inhibiting the constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous leukemia-cell proteins, including the src family member Lyn. PD166326 also prolonged the survival of mice with imatinib mesylate-resistant CML induced by the Bcr/Abl mutants P210/H396P and P210/M351T. Altogether, these findings demonstrate the potential of more potent Bcr/Abl inhibitors to provide more effective antileukemic activity. Clinical development of PD166326 or a related analog may lead to more effective drugs for the treatment of de novo and imatinib mesylate-resistant CML.
    Blood 06/2005; 105(10):3995-4003. · 9.78 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

7k Citations
1,396.04 Total Impact Points

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Institutions

  • 1970–2006
    • Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
      • • Division of Molecular Pharmacology & Chemistry
      • • Department of Medicine
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1993
    • Cancer Research Institute
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1970–1992
    • Cornell University
      • Department of Medicine
      Ithaca, NY, United States
  • 1991
    • Clarkson University
      Potsdam, New York, United States
  • 1990
    • Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
      Mayence, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
  • 1987
    • Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
      Cold Spring Harbor, New York, United States
  • 1982
    • University of Münster
      • Department of Internal Medicine
      Muenster, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 1975
    • Devry College of New York, USA
      New York City, New York, United States