Andy Wullaert

University of Cologne, Köln, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

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Publications (23)207.91 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The human colon harbours a plethora of bacteria known to broadly impact on mucosal metabolism and function and thought to be involved in inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis and colon cancer development. In this report, we investigated the effect of colonic bacteria on epithelial cell differentiation factors in vitro and in vivo. As key transcription factors we focused on Hes1, known to direct towards an absorptive cell fate, Hath1 and KLF4, which govern goblet cell. Expression of the transcription factors Hes1, Hath1 and KLF4, the mucins Muc1 and Muc2 and the defensin HBD2 were measured by real-time PCR in LS174T cells following incubation with several heat-inactivated E. coli strains, including the probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917+/- flagellin, Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria. For protein detection Western blot experiments and chamber-slide immunostaining were performed. Finally, mRNA and protein expression of these factors was evaluated in the colon of germfree vs. specific pathogen free vs. conventionalized mice and colonic goblet cells were counted. Expression of Hes1 and Hath1, and to a minor degree also of KLF4, was reduced by E. coli K-12 and E. coli Nissle 1917. In contrast, Muc1 and HBD2 expression were significantly enhanced, independent of the Notch signalling pathway. Probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 regulated Hes1, Hath1, Muc1 and HBD2 through flagellin. In vivo experiments confirmed the observed in vitro effects of bacteria by a diminished colonic expression of Hath1 and KLF4 in specific pathogen free and conventionalized mice as compared to germ free mice whereas the number of goblet cells was unchanged in these mice. Intestinal bacteria influence the intestinal epithelial differentiation factors Hes1, Hath1 and KLF4, as well as Muc1 and HBD2, in vitro and in vivo. The induction of Muc1 and HBD2 seems to be triggered directly by bacteria and not by Notch.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(2):e55620. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: [This corrects the article on p. e55620 in vol. 8.].
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(5). · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Intestinal immune homeostasis depends on a tightly regulated cross talk between commensal bacteria, mucosal immune cells and intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). Epithelial barrier disruption is considered to be a potential cause of inflammatory bowel disease; however, the mechanisms regulating intestinal epithelial integrity are poorly understood. Here we show that mice with IEC-specific knockout of FADD (FADD(IEC-KO)), an adaptor protein required for death-receptor-induced apoptosis, spontaneously developed epithelial cell necrosis, loss of Paneth cells, enteritis and severe erosive colitis. Genetic deficiency in RIP3, a critical regulator of programmed necrosis, prevented the development of spontaneous pathology in both the small intestine and colon of FADD(IEC-KO) mice, demonstrating that intestinal inflammation is triggered by RIP3-dependent death of FADD-deficient IECs. Epithelial-specific inhibition of CYLD, a deubiquitinase that regulates cellular necrosis, prevented colitis development in FADD(IEC-KO) but not in NEMO(IEC-KO) mice, showing that different mechanisms mediated death of colonic epithelial cells in these two models. In FADD(IEC-KO) mice, TNF deficiency ameliorated colon inflammation, whereas MYD88 deficiency and also elimination of the microbiota prevented colon inflammation, indicating that bacteria-mediated Toll-like-receptor signalling drives colitis by inducing the expression of TNF and other cytokines. However, neither CYLD, TNF or MYD88 deficiency nor elimination of the microbiota could prevent Paneth cell loss and enteritis in FADD(IEC-KO) mice, showing that different mechanisms drive RIP3-dependent necrosis of FADD-deficient IECs in the small and large bowel. Therefore, by inhibiting RIP3-mediated IEC necrosis, FADD preserves epithelial barrier integrity and antibacterial defence, maintains homeostasis and prevents chronic intestinal inflammation. Collectively, these results show that mechanisms preventing RIP3-mediated epithelial cell death are critical for the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and indicate that programmed necrosis of IECs might be implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, in which Paneth cell and barrier defects are thought to contribute to intestinal inflammation.
    Nature 07/2011; 477(7364):330-4. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many cancers display increased NF-κB activity, and NF-κB inhibition is known to diminish tumor development in multiple mouse models, supporting an important role of NF-κB in carcinogenesis. NF-κB activation in premalignant or cancer cells is believed to promote tumor development mainly by protecting these cells from apoptosis. However, it remains unclear to what extent NF-κB activation exhibits additional protumorigenic functions in premalignant cells that could be sufficient to induce spontaneous tumor development. Here we show that expression of constitutively active IκB kinase 2 (IKK2ca) in mouse intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) induced spontaneous tumors in aged mice and also strongly enhanced chemical- and Apc mutation-mediated carcinogenesis. IECs expressing IKK2ca displayed altered Wnt signaling and increased proliferation and elevated expression of genes encoding intestinal stem cell-associated factors including Ascl2, Olfm4, DLK1, and Bmi-1, indicating that increased IKK2/NF-κB activation synergized with Wnt signaling to drive intestinal tumorigenesis. Moreover, IECs expressing IKK2ca produced cytokines and chemokines that induced the recruitment of myeloid cells and activated stromal fibroblasts to become myofibroblasts, thus creating a tumor-promoting microenvironment. Taken together, our results show that constitutively increased activation of IKK2/NF-κB signaling in the intestinal epithelium is sufficient to induce the full spectrum of cell-intrinsic and stromal alterations required for intestinal tumorigenesis.
    The Journal of clinical investigation 06/2011; 121(7):2781-93. · 15.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The IκB kinase/NF-κB signaling pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. Increased activation of NF-κB is often detected in both immune and non-immune cells in tissues affected by chronic inflammation, where it is believed to exert detrimental functions by inducing the expression of proinflammatory mediators that orchestrate and sustain the inflammatory response and cause tissue damage. Thus, increased NF-κB activation is considered an important pathogenic factor in many acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, raising hopes that NF-κB inhibitors could be effective for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, ample evidence has accumulated that NF-κB inhibition can also be harmful for the organism, and in some cases trigger the development of inflammation and disease. These findings suggested that NF-κB signaling has important functions for the maintenance of physiological immune homeostasis and for the prevention of inflammatory diseases in many tissues. This beneficial function of NF-κB has been predominantly observed in epithelial cells, indicating that NF-κB signaling has a particularly important role for the maintenance of immune homeostasis in epithelial tissues. It seems therefore that NF-κB displays two faces in chronic inflammation: on the one hand increased and sustained NF-κB activation induces inflammation and tissue damage, but on the other hand inhibition of NF-κB signaling can also disturb immune homeostasis, triggering inflammation and disease. Here, we discuss the mechanisms that control these apparently opposing functions of NF-κB signaling, focusing particularly on the role of NF-κB in the regulation of immune homeostasis and inflammation in the intestine and the skin.
    Cell Research 01/2011; 21(1):146-58. · 10.53 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Crohn's and Colitis Supplements. 01/2010; 4(1):23-23.
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    ABSTRACT: In addition to progressive CD4(+) T cell immune deficiency, HIV infection is characterized by generalized immune activation, thought to arise from increased microbial exposure resulting from diminishing immunity. Here we report that, in a virus-free mouse model, conditional ablation of activated CD4(+) T cells, the targets of immunodeficiency viruses, accelerates their turnover and produces CD4(+) T cell immune deficiency. More importantly, activated CD4(+) T cell killing also results in generalized immune activation, which is attributable to regulatory CD4(+) T cell insufficiency and preventable by regulatory CD4(+) T cell reconstitution. Immune activation in this model develops independently of microbial exposure. Furthermore, microbial translocation in mice with conditional disruption of intestinal epithelial integrity affects myeloid but not T cell homeostasis. Although neither ablation of activated CD4(+) T cells nor disruption of intestinal epithelial integrity in mice fully reproduces every aspect of HIV-associated immune dysfunction in humans, ablation of activated CD4(+) T cells, but not disruption of intestinal epithelial integrity, approximates the two key immune alterations in HIV infection: CD4(+) T cell immune deficiency and generalized immune activation. We therefore propose activated CD4(+) T cell killing as a common etiology for both immune deficiency and activation in HIV infection.
    Journal of Biology 11/2009; 8(10):93.
  • Andy Wullaert
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    ABSTRACT: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are characterised by a disturbance of intestinal immune homeostasis, either caused by or followed by inappropriate responses to the resident commensal bacteria. Although the transcription factor NF-kappaB actively participates in the excessive inflammatory response observed in IBD, recent studies with mice defective in NF-kappaB activation have revealed that NF-kappaB also serves an essential protective function in the intestinal immune system. The enormous amount of commensal bacteria in the intestine might play a role in the distinct functions of NF-kappaB in the intestine, as they can initiate signalling to NF-kappaB through both Toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors in intestinal epithelial cells as well as mucosal immune cells. However, the exact individual contributions of different NF-kappaB-activating stimuli as well as the target cells that mediate the detrimental or beneficial functions of NF-kappaB in the intestine are still elusive. In this review, I will summarise and discuss the current knowledge on the role of different NF-kappaB-activating pathways in preserving intestinal immune homeostasis and the development of intestinal inflammation.
    International journal of medical microbiology: IJMM 09/2009; 300(1):49-56. · 4.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently overexpressed in various tumours of epidermal origin and is held responsible for tumourigenicity and tumour persistence. Increased nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activity has been suggested to be involved in the malignant behaviour of EGFR-overexpressing cells. However, the mechanisms that regulate EGF-induced NF-kappaB activation are still largely unknown. Here we show that EGF can induce NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression independently from IkappaBalpha degradation or p100 processing in EGFR-overexpressing HEK293T cells. Moreover, EGF-induced NF-kappaB activation could be inhibited by overexpression of ABINs, which were previously identified as intracellular inhibitors of tumour necrosis factor, interleukin-1 and lipopolysaccharide-induced NF-kappaB activation. Knockdown of ABIN-1 by RNA interference boosted the NF-kappaB response upon EGF stimulation. The C-terminal ubiquitin-binding domain containing region of ABINs was crucial and sufficient for NF-kappaB inhibition. Adenoviral gene transfer of ABINs reduced constitutive NF-kappaB activity as well as the proliferation of EGFR-overexpressing A431 and DU145 human carcinoma cells. Altogether, these results demonstrate an important role for an ABIN-sensitive non-classical NF-kappaB signalling pathway in the proliferation of EGFR-overexpressing tumour cells, and indicate a potential use for ABIN gene therapy in the treatment of cancer.
    Oncogene 08/2008; 27(47):6131-40. · 8.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that forms a serious problem for immunocompromised patients and also the leading cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis. The overall importance of a functional Type III secretion system (T3SS) in P. aeruginosa virulence has been well established, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Using in vitro infected macrophages as w as a murine model of acute lung infection, we show that the Caspase-1 mediated maturation and secretion of IL-1beta needs a translocation competent T3SS and Flagellin, but not the Type III effector proteins ExoS, ExoT and ExoY. However, ExoS was found to negative regulate the P. aeruginosa induced IL-1beta maturation by a mechanism that is dependent on its ADP ribosyltransferase activity. Moreov ExoS deficiency also switched the mode of macrophage death from apoptosis to pro-inflammatory pyroptosis. Altogether, these data demonstrate a dual role for the P. aeruginosa T3SS in the regulation of Caspase-1 mediated IL-1beta production and provide new insights into the mechanisms of immune evasion by this pathogen.
    Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine 01/2008; 12(5A):1767-76. · 4.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Benzoylaminoalkanohydroxamic acids, including 5-(4-dimethylaminobenzoyl)aminovaleric acid hydroxamide (4-Me(2)N-BAVAH), are structural analogues of Trichostatin A, a naturally occurring histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi). 4-Me(2)N-BAVAH has been shown to induce histone hyperacetylation and to inhibit proliferation in Friend erythroleukaemia cells in vitro. However, the molecular mechanisms have remained unidentified. In this study, we evaluated the effects of 4-Me(2)N-BAVAH on proliferation in non-malignant cells, namely epidermal growth factor-stimulated primary rat hepatocytes. We have found that 4-Me(2)N-BAVAH inhibits HDAC activity at non-cytotoxic concentrations and prevents cells from responding to the mitogenic stimuli of epidermal growth factor. This results in an early G(1) cell cycle arrest that is independent of p21 activity, but instead can be attributed to inhibition of cyclin D1 transcription through a mechanism involving inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB activation. In addition, 4-Me(2)N-BAVAH delays the onset of spontaneous apoptosis in primary rat hepatocyte cultures as evidenced by down-regulation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bid and Bax, and inhibition of caspase-3 activation.
    Cell Proliferation 11/2007; 40(5):640-55. · 2.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The proinflammatory cytokine TNF has a pivotal role in liver pathophysiology because it holds the capacity to induce both hepatocyte cell death and hepatocyte proliferation. This dual effect of TNF on hepatocytes reflects its ability to induce both nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB)-dependent gene expression and cell death. Multiple studies have demonstrated the crucial role of the transcription factor NF-kappaB in the decision between life and death of a hepatocyte. Massive hepatocyte apoptosis preceding embryonic lethality in NF-kappaB-deficient mice constituted the first indication of an essential antiapoptotic function of NF-kappaB in the liver. Although many studies confirmed this crucial cytoprotective role of NF-kappaB in adult liver, a number of genetic studies recently obtained conflicting results on the exact role of NF-kappaB in different mouse models of TNF hepatotoxicity, demonstrating that caution should be taken when interpreting studies using different NF-kappaB-deficient mice in distinct models of liver injury. Recent reports showing a role for hepatic NF-kappaB activation in the proliferation of malignant cells during hepatocarcinogenesis, and in the progression of fatty liver diseases to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus demonstrate that NF-kappaB can also have more detrimental effects in the liver. Moreover, its role in the development of the metabolic syndrome emphasizes that hepatic NF-kappaB activation might also have adverse effects on the endocrine system. Therefore, understanding the regulation of hepatic TNF signaling and NF-kappaB activation is of critical therapeutic importance. In this review, we summarize how studies on the role of NF-kappaB in different mouse models of liver pathologies have contributed to this understanding.
    Endocrine Reviews 07/2007; 28(4):365-86. · 14.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Deregulation of intestinal immune responses seems to have a principal function in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. The gut epithelium is critically involved in the maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis-acting as a physical barrier separating luminal bacteria and immune cells, and also expressing antimicrobial peptides. However, the molecular mechanisms that control this function of gut epithelial cells are poorly understood. Here we show that the transcription factor NF-kappaB, a master regulator of pro-inflammatory responses, functions in gut epithelial cells to control epithelial integrity and the interaction between the mucosal immune system and gut microflora. Intestinal epithelial-cell-specific inhibition of NF-kappaB through conditional ablation of NEMO (also called IkappaB kinase-gamma (IKKgamma)) or both IKK1 (IKKalpha) and IKK2 (IKKbeta)-IKK subunits essential for NF-kappaB activation-spontaneously caused severe chronic intestinal inflammation in mice. NF-kappaB deficiency led to apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells, impaired expression of antimicrobial peptides and translocation of bacteria into the mucosa. Concurrently, this epithelial defect triggered a chronic inflammatory response in the colon, initially dominated by innate immune cells but later also involving T lymphocytes. Deficiency of the gene encoding the adaptor protein MyD88 prevented the development of intestinal inflammation, demonstrating that Toll-like receptor activation by intestinal bacteria is essential for disease pathogenesis in this mouse model. Furthermore, NEMO deficiency sensitized epithelial cells to tumour-necrosis factor (TNF)-induced apoptosis, whereas TNF receptor-1 inactivation inhibited intestinal inflammation, demonstrating that TNF receptor-1 signalling is crucial for disease induction. These findings demonstrate that a primary NF-kappaB signalling defect in intestinal epithelial cells disrupts immune homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract, causing an inflammatory-bowel-disease-like phenotype. Our results identify NF-kappaB signalling in the gut epithelium as a critical regulator of epithelial integrity and intestinal immune homeostasis, and have important implications for understanding the mechanisms controlling the pathogenesis of human inflammatory bowel disease.
    Nature 04/2007; 446(7135):557-61. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recognition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 initiates an intracellular signaling pathway leading to the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). Although LPS-induced activation of NF-kappaB is critical to the induction of an efficient immune response, excessive or prolonged signaling from TLR4 can be harmful to the host. Therefore, the NF-kappaB signal transduction pathway demands tight regulation. In the present study, we describe the human protein Listeria INDuced (LIND) as a novel A20-binding inhibitor of NF-kappaB activation (ABIN) that is related to ABIN-1 and -2 and, therefore, is further referred to as ABIN-3. Similar to the other ABINs, ABIN-3 binds to A20 and inhibits NF-kappaB activation induced by tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. However, unlike the other ABINs, constitutive expression of ABIN-3 could not be detected in different human cells. Treatment of human monocytic cells with LPS strongly induced ABIN-3 mRNA and protein expression, suggesting a role for ABIN-3 in the LPS/TLR4 pathway. Indeed, ABIN-3 overexpression was found to inhibit NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression in response to LPS/TLR4 at a level downstream of TRAF6 and upstream of IKKbeta. NF-kappaB inhibition was mediated by the ABIN-homology domain 2 and was independent of A20 binding. Moreover, in vivo adenoviral gene transfer of ABIN-3 in mice reduced LPS-induced NF-kappaB activity in the liver, thereby partially protecting mice against LPS/D-(+)-galactosamine-induced mortality. Taken together, these results implicate ABIN-3 as a novel negative feedback regulator of LPS-induced NF-kappaB activation.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 02/2007; 282(1):81-90. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The authors would like to draw the readers’ attention to the fact that in the above article, an incorrect version of Table 1 was published. The correct version of Table 1 is printed below:
    Cell Proliferation 01/2007; 40(6):961-961. · 2.27 Impact Factor
  • Zeitschrift Fur Gastroenterologie - Z GASTROENTEROL. 01/2007; 45(08).
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    ABSTRACT: The transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) has a pivotal role in initiating inflammation and raising an effective immune response. Because NF-kappaB activation depends on ubiquitination, cells have developed ubiquitin (Ub)-mediated strategies for inhibiting NF-kappaB activation and preventing excessive inflammation. Recent findings concerning tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor and toll-like receptor (TLR)-interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor signalling pathways show that Ub can be a tool as well as a target for NF-kappaB inhibitory proteins, either by labelling specific signalling proteins for proteasome-dependent degradation or by serving as a target for specific de-ubiquitinating enzymes that prevent the formation of pertinent signalling complexes. Interfering with ubiquitination therefore seems to be a versatile means for regulating NF-kappaB activity, indicating that studies of Ub-mediated signalling might hold the key for developing new therapeutic strategies for inflammatory disease.
    Trends in Immunology 12/2006; 27(11):533-40. · 9.49 Impact Factor
  • Andy Wullaert, Karen Heyninck, Rudi Beyaert
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    ABSTRACT: Hepatocyte cell death is a universal feature of inflammatory liver diseases. The observation that mice deficient in the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) are not viable because of excessive hepatocyte apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) made it crystal-clear that NF-kappaB plays a central role in protecting hepatocytes against TNF-induced cell death. Also during TNF-mediated liver injury, NF-kappaB was shown to have an essential anti-apoptotic effect, underscoring the therapeutic importance of understanding its underlying molecular mechanisms. For a long time, the ability of NF-kappaB to induce the expression of a variety of anti-apoptotic proteins was thought to be solely responsible for its cytoprotective effects. However, during the past few years it has become clear that NF-kappaB-mediated inhibition of cell death also involves attenuating TNF-induced activation of c-Jun activating kinase (JNK). Whereas transient activation of JNK upon TNF treatment is associated with cellular survival, prolonged JNK activation contributes to cell death. Several studies have shown that NF-kappaB activation inhibits the sustained phase of TNF-induced JNK activation and thus protects cells against TNF cytotoxicity. In this review, we will discuss the various mechanisms by which NF-kappaB activation blunts TNF-induced JNK activation, including the induction of JNK inhibitory proteins and controlling the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, because the cytoprotective effects of NF-kappaB activation are particularly important in liver physiology, we will put each of these JNK-inhibitory mechanisms into a 'hepatic perspective' by discussing their role in various mouse models of TNF-mediated liver injury.
    Biochemical Pharmacology 11/2006; 72(9):1090-101. · 4.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-positive cells is essential for eliminating Gram-negative bacteria, overactivation of these cells by the TLR4 ligand LPS initiates a systemic inflammatory reaction and shock. Here we demonstrate that SPRET/Ei mice, derived from Mus spretus, exhibit a dominant resistance against LPS-induced lethality. This resistance is mediated by bone marrow-derived cells. Macrophages from these mice exhibit normal signaling and gene expression responses that depend on the myeloid differentiation factor 88 adaptor protein, but they are impaired in IFN-β production. The defect appears to be specific for IFN-β, although the SPRET/Ei IFN-β promoter is normal. In vivo IFN-β induction by LPS or influenza virus is very low in SPRET/Ei mice, but IFN-β-treatment restores the sensitivity to LPS, and IFN type 1 receptor-deficient mice are also resistant to LPS. Because of the defective induction of IFN-β, these mice are completely resistant to Listeria monocytogenes and highly sensitive to Leishmania major infection. Stimulation of SPRET/Ei macrophages leads to rapid down-regulation of IFN type 1 receptor mRNA expression, which is reflected in poor induction of IFN-β-dependent genes. This finding indicates that the resistance of SPRET/Ei mice to LPS is due to disruption of a positive-feedback loop that amplifies IFN-β production. In contrast to TLR4-deficient mice, SPRET/Ei mice resist both LPS and sepsis induced with Klebsiella pneumoniae.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 02/2006; 103(7):2292-2297. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a proinflammatory cytokine that plays a central role in acute and chronic hepatitis B and C infection and alcoholic liver disease as well as fulminant liver failure. TNF-induced liver failure is characterized by parenchymal cell apoptosis and inflammation leading to liver cell necrosis. The transcription factor NF-kappaB is believed to mediate at least part of the proinflammatory effects of TNF, and is therefore a favorite drug target. However, NF-kappaB also suppresses TNF-mediated hepatocyte apoptosis, implicating a potential cytotoxic effect of NF-kappaB inhibitors in the liver. This dual function of NF-kappaB emphasizes the need for therapeutics that can inhibit both TNF-induced NF-kappaB activation and cell death. Here we describe that adenoviral expression of the NF-kappaB inhibitory protein ABIN-1, but not an IkappaBalpha superrepressor (IkappaBalpha(s)), completely prevents lethality in the TNF/D-(+)-galactosamine-induced model of liver failure. Protection was associated with a significant decrease in TNF-induced leukocyte infiltration as well as hepatocyte apoptosis. The differential effects of ABIN-1 and IkappaBalpha(s) suggest a role for an NF-kappaB independent function of ABIN-1. Indeed, ABIN-1 was found to prevent not only NF-kappaB activation, but also apoptosis of cultured hepatocytes in response to TNF, explaining its protective effect against TNF-induced liver failure. In conclusion, ABIN-1 has a dual NF-kappaB inhibitory and anti-apoptotic activity in the liver, which might be of considerable interest for the treatment of inflammatory liver diseases.
    Hepatology 09/2005; 42(2):381-9. · 12.00 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
207.91 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007–2013
    • University of Cologne
      • Institute for Genetics
      Köln, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2003–2007
    • Ghent University
      • • VIB Department of Molecular Biomedical Research (DMBR)
      • • Department of Molecular Biotechnology
      Gent, VLG, Belgium