Jerry J Sweet

NorthShore University HealthSystem, Chicago, Illinois, United States

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Publications (87)148.49 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The 20th anniversary of the Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings is celebrated by highlighting the scientist-practitioner philosophy on which it was founded. The goal of the Journal-to provide an outlet for evidence-based approaches to healthcare that underscore the important scientific and clinical contributions of psychology in medical settings-is discussed. The contemporary relevance of this approach is related to the current implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care and its focus on accountability and the development of an interprofessional healthcare workforce; both of which have been foci of the Journal throughout its history and will continue to be so into the future. Several recommendations of future topic areas for the Journal to highlight regarding scientific, practice, policy, and education and training in professional health service psychology are offered. Successfully addressing these topics will support the growth of the field of psychology in the ever evolving healthcare system of the future and continue ensure that the Journal is a key source of professional information in health service psychology.
    Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings 02/2014; · 1.49 Impact Factor
  • Behavioral Sciences & the Law 09/2013; · 0.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs at a high incidence, involving millions of individuals in the U.S. alone. Related to this, there are large numbers of litigants and claimants who are referred annually for forensic evaluation. In formulating opinions regarding claimed injuries, the present review advises experts to rely on two sets of information: TBI outcome and neuropsychological dose-response studies of non-litigants and non-claimants, and response bias literature that has demonstrated the relatively high risk of invalid responding among examinees referred within a secondary gain context, which in turn has resulted in the development of specific assessment methods. Regarding prospective methods for detecting possible response bias, both symptom validity tests, for measuring over-reporting of symptoms on inventories and questionnaires, and performance validity tests, for measuring insufficient effort on ability tests, are considered essential. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Behavioral Sciences & the Law 09/2013; · 0.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Symptom cluster research expands cancer investigations beyond a focus on individual symptoms in isolation. We conducted a prospective longitudinal study of sleep, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and perceived cognitive impairment in patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. Patient-reported outcome measures were administered prior to chemotherapy, at Cycle 4 Day 1, and six months after initiating chemotherapy. Participants were divided into four groups and assigned a symptom cluster index (SCI) score based on the number/severity of symptoms reported at enrollment. Participants (N = 80) were mostly women (97.5%) with Stage II (69.0%) breast cancer, 29-71 years of age. Scores on all measures were moderately-highly correlated across all time points. There were time effects for all symptoms, except sleep quality (nonsignificant trend), with most symptoms worsening during chemotherapy, although anxiety improved. There were no significant group × time interactions; all four SCI groups showed a similar trajectory of symptoms over time. Worse performance status and quality of life were associated with higher SCI score over time. With the exception of anxiety, the coherence of the symptom cluster was supported by similar patterns of severity and change over time in these symptoms (trend for sleep quality). Participants with higher SCI scores prior to chemotherapy continued to experience greater symptom burden during and after chemotherapy. Early assessment and intervention addressing this symptom cluster (vs. individual symptoms) may have a greater impact on patient performance status and quality of life for patients with higher SCIs.
    Journal of pain and symptom management 07/2013; · 2.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Cross-sectional data suggest that many individuals with breast cancer experience significant sleep disturbance across the continuum of care. Understanding the longitudinal trajectory of sleep disturbance may help identify factors associated with its onset, severity, or influence on health-related quality of life (HRQL). Study objectives were to observe sleep quality in breast cancer patients prior to, during, and after completion of adjuvant chemotherapy, evaluate its relationship with HRQL and explore correlates over time. METHODS: Participants were administered patient-reported outcome measures including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G), which assesses HRQL. Data were collected prospectively 3-14 days prior to beginning chemotherapy, cycle 4 day 1 of chemotherapy, and 6 months following initiation of chemotherapy. RESULTS: Participants (n = 80) were primarily women (97.5 %) with stage II (69.0 %) breast cancer. Total FACT-G scores were negatively correlated with global PSQI scores at each time point (rho = -0.46, -0.41, -0.45; all p < 0.001). Poor sleep quality (PSQI ≥ 5) was prevalent at all time points (48.5-65.8 %); however, there were no significant changes within participants over time. Correlates with sleep quality varied across time points. Participants with poor sleep quality reported worse overall HRQL, fatigue, depression, and vasomotor/endocrine symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that early identification of sleep disturbance and ongoing assessment and treatment of contributing factors over the course of care may minimize symptom burden associated with chemotherapy and prevent chronic insomnia in survivorship.
    Supportive Care in Cancer 10/2012; · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A conference specific to the education and training of clinical neuropsychology was held in 1997, which led to a report published in the Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology (Hannay, J., Bieliauskas, L., Crosson, B., Hammeke, T., Hamsher, K., & Koffler, S. (1998). Proceedings of the Houston Conference on Specialty Education and Training in Clinical Neuropsychology. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 13, 157-250.). The guidelines produced by this conference have been referred to as the Houston Conference (HC) guidelines. Since that time, there has been considerable discussion, and some disagreement, about whether the HC guidelines produced a positive outcome in the training of neuropsychologists. To explore this question and determine how widely the HC guidelines were implemented, a meeting was held in 2006. Present and past leaders of the American Psychological Association Division 40 (Clinical Neuropsychology), the National Academy of Neuropsychology, and the Association of Postdoctoral Programs in Clinical Neuropsychology met to discuss the possible need for an Inter-Organizational Summit on Education and Training (ISET). A decision was reached to have the ISET Steering Committee conduct a survey of clinical neuropsychologists that could address the extent to which HC guidelines were present in the specialty and whether the influence of the HC guidelines was positive. An online survey was constructed, with data gathered in 2010. The current paper presents and discusses the ISET survey results. Specific findings need to be viewed cautiously due to the relatively low response rate. However, with some direct parallels to a larger recent survey of clinical neuropsychologists, the following general conclusions appear well founded: (a) the demographics of respondents in the ISET survey are comparable with a recent larger professional practice survey and thus may reasonably represent the specialty; (b) the HC guidelines appear to have been widely adopted by training programs, in that a large proportion of younger practitioners endorsed having had HC-adherent training; and (c) HC-adherent training is associated with a higher frequency endorsement of being well prepared to engage in key professional activities subsequent to the completion of training when compared with those not having HC-adherent training. Overall, the ISET Steering Committee has concluded that the HC guidelines have been widely adopted and that trainees associate participation in HC-adherent training as advantageous. A potential revision based on unfavorable outcomes is deemed unnecessary. Nonetheless, the ISET Steering Committee recognizes that training needs change as a function of the broadening of our field and the introduction of related new technologies, which may prompt updates. The ISET Steering Committee supports the idea that periodic review and updating of training models may be is prudent.
    The Clinical Neuropsychologist 08/2012; 26(7):1055-76. · 1.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A conference specific to the education and training of clinical neuropsychology was held in 1997, which led to a report published in the Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology (Hannay, J., Bieliauskas, L., Crosson, B., Hammeke, T., Hamsher, K., & Koffler, S. (1998). Proceedings of the Houston Conference on Specialty Education and Training in Clinical Neuropsychology. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 13, 157-250.). The guidelines produced by this conference have been referred to as the Houston Conference (HC) guidelines. Since that time, there has been considerable discussion, and some disagreement, about whether the HC guidelines produced a positive outcome in the training of neuropsychologists. To explore this question and determine how widely the HC guidelines were implemented, a meeting was held in 2006. Present and past leaders of the American Psychological Association Division 40 (Clinical Neuropsychology), the National Academy of Neuropsychology, and the Association of Postdoctoral Programs in Clinical Neuropsychology met to discuss the possible need for an Inter-Organizational Summit on Education and Training (ISET). A decision was reached to have the ISET Steering Committee conduct a survey of clinical neuropsychologists that could address the extent to which HC guidelines were present in the specialty and whether the influence of the HC guidelines was positive. An online survey was constructed, with data gathered in 2010. The current paper presents and discusses the ISET survey results. Specific findings need to be viewed cautiously due to the relatively low response rate. However, with some direct parallels to a larger recent survey of clinical neuropsychologists, the following general conclusions appear well founded: (a) the demographics of respondents in the ISET survey are comparable with a recent larger professional practice survey and thus may reasonably represent the specialty; (b) the HC guidelines appear to have been widely adopted by training programs, in that a large proportion of younger practitioners endorsed having had HC-adherent training; and (c) HC-adherent training is associated with a higher frequency endorsement of being well prepared to engage in key professional activities subsequent to the completion of training when compared with those not having HC-adherent training. Overall, the ISET Steering Committee has concluded that the HC guidelines have been widely adopted and that trainees associate participation in HC-adherent training as advantageous. A potential revision based on unfavorable outcomes is deemed unnecessary. Nonetheless, the ISET Steering Committee recognizes that training needs change as a function of the broadening of our field and the introduction of related new technologies, which may prompt updates. The ISET Steering Committee supports the idea that periodic review and updating of training models is prudent.
    Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 08/2012; 27(7):796-812. · 2.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Doctoral-level members of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology, Division 40 (Clinical Neuropsychology) of the American Psychological Association, and the National Academy of Neuropsychology, and other neuropsychologists, were invited to participate in a web-based survey in early 2010. The sample of respondents was 56% larger than a prior related income and practice survey in 2005. The substantial proportional change in gender taking place in the field has continued, with 7 of 10 post-doctoral residents being women and, for the first time ever, more than half of the total sample of respondents being women. Whereas the median age of APA members has been over 50 since the early 1990s, the current median age of clinical neuropsychologists remains at 47 and has remained essentially unchanged since 1989, indicating substantial entrance of young psychologists into the field. The Houston Conference training model has influenced the vast majority of residency training sites, and is endorsed as compatible with prior training by two-thirds of all respondents. Testing assistant usage remains commonplace, and is much more common in institutions. The "flexible battery" approach has again increased in popularity and predominates, whereas endorsement of the "fixed/standardized battery" approach has continued to decline. The vast majority of clinical neuropsychologists work full time. Average length of time reported for evaluations increased significantly from 2005, which does not appear to be explained by changes in common referral sources or common diagnostic conditions being evaluated. The most common factors affecting evaluation length were identified, with the top three being goal of evaluation, stamina/health of examinee, and age of examinee. Pediatric specialists are more likely than others to work part time, more likely to be women, more likely to work in institutions, and report lower incomes than respondents whose professional identity is purely adult or a combination of adult and pediatric. Incomes once again vary considerably by years of clinical practice, work setting, amount of forensic practice, state, and region of country. Job satisfaction has little relationship to income and is comparable across most variables (e.g., work setting, professional identity, amount of forensic activity), whereas income satisfaction has a stronger relationship to actual income, and income satisfaction and job satisfaction are moderately correlated. Job satisfaction of neuropsychologists in general is higher than reported for other US jobs. Fewer than 5% of respondents are considering changing job position. As was true in the 2005 survey, a substantial majority of respondents reported increased incomes over the last 5 years. Actual reported income values were meaningfully higher than in 2005 across general work settings and professional identities, and were also higher for entry-level positions. Numerous breakdowns related to income and professional activities are provided.
    The Clinical Neuropsychologist 01/2011; 25(1):12-61. · 1.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Serial assessments are now common in neuropsychological practice, and have a recognized value in numerous clinical and forensic settings. These assessments can aid in differential diagnosis, tracking neuropsychological strengths and weaknesses over time, and managing various neurologic and psychiatric conditions. This document provides a discussion of the benefits and challenges of serial neuropsychological testing in the context of clinical and forensic assessments. Recommendations regarding the use of repeated testing in neuropsychological practice are provided.
    The Clinical Neuropsychologist 11/2010; 24(8):1267-78. · 1.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Clinical research interest in the symptom reporting validity scale currently known as the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) Symptom Validity Scale (FBS) has continued to be strong, with multiple new publications annually in peer-reviewed journals that publish psychological and neuropsychological assessment research. Related to this growth in relevant literature, the present study was conducted to update the Nelson, Sweet, and Demakis (2006b) FBS meta-analysis. A total of 83 FBS studies (43 new studies) were identified, and 32 (38.5%) met inclusion criteria. Analyses were conducted on a pooled sample of 2218 over-reporting and 3123 comparison participants. Large omnibus effect sizes were observed for FBS, Obvious-Subtle (O-S), and the Dissimulation Scale-Revised (Dsr2) scales. Moderate effect sizes were observed for the following scales: Back Infrequency (Fb), Gough's F-K, Infrequency (F), Infrequency Psychopathology (Fp), and Dissimulation (Ds2). Moderator analyses illustrate that relative to the F-family scales, FBS exhibited larger effect sizes when (1) effort is known to be insufficient and (2) evaluation is conducted in the context of traumatic brain injury. Overall, current results summarize an extensive literature that continues to support use of FBS in forensic neuropsychology practice.
    The Clinical Neuropsychologist 05/2010; 24(4):701-24. · 1.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There are critical issues facing the neuropsychological community, such as inadequate reimbursement for services, a lack of familiarity among public policy makers regarding the science and practice of neuropsychology, and a lack of public policy awareness among professional neuropsychologists. Advocacy for the field is the most effective way to undertake positive change. Currently, a minority of psychological professionals actively engages in an advocacy process, while the majority is not involved, or is involved periodically or passively. With weak advocacy our field risks slower development in key areas, and without strong and constant advocacy we risk losing ground previously gained. The purpose of this article, and those that follow in this special issue of The Clinical Neuropsychologist, is to: (1) convey the importance of advocacy, (2) address and dispel unfounded mental obstacles that inhibit involvement in advocating for the specialty, and (3) aid neuropsychologists in preparing to join the advocacy process. To accomplish this, we acquaint readers with the advocacy process, delineate to practitioners how they can become involved, and encourage participation in advocacy.
    The Clinical Neuropsychologist 10/2009; 24(3):373-90. · 1.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study determined whether performance patterns on the California Verbal Learning Test-II (CVLT-II) could differentiate participants with traumatic brain injury (TBI) showing adequate effort from those with mild TBI exhibiting poor effort using a case-control design. The TBI group consisted of 124 persons with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The poor effort group consisted of 77 persons with mild head injury who were involved in litigation (LG) and failed at least one stand-alone symptom validity measure (SVT) and also either a second SVT or an effort indicator embedded within a standard clinical test. A total of 18 CVLT-II variables were investigated using Bayesian model averaging (BMA) for logistic regression to determine which variables best differentiated the groups. The CVLT-II variables having the most support were Long-Delay Free Recall, Total Recognition Discriminability (d'), and Total Recall Discriminability.
    The Clinical Neuropsychologist 09/2009; 24(1):153-68. · 1.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: During the past two decades clinical and research efforts have led to increasingly sophisticated and effective methods and instruments designed to detect exaggeration or fabrication of neuropsychological dysfunction, as well as somatic and psychological symptom complaints. A vast literature based on relevant research has emerged and substantial portions of professional meetings attended by clinical neuropsychologists have addressed topics related to malingering (Sweet, King, Malina, Bergman, & Simmons, 2002). Yet, despite these extensive activities, understanding the need for methods of detecting problematic effort and response bias and addressing the presence or absence of malingering has proven challenging for practitioners. A consensus conference, comprised of national and international experts in clinical neuropsychology, was held at the 2008 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology (AACN) for the purposes of refinement of critical issues in this area. This consensus statement documents the current state of knowledge and recommendations of expert clinical neuropsychologists and is intended to assist clinicians and researchers with regard to the neuropsychological assessment of effort, response bias, and malingering.
    The Clinical Neuropsychologist 09/2009; 23(7):1093-129. · 1.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The peer-review process is an invaluable service provided by the professional community, and it provides the critical foundation for the advancement of science. However, there is remarkably little systematic guidance for individuals who wish to become part of this process. This paper, written from the perspective of reviewers and editors with varying levels of experience, provides general guidelines and advice for new reviewers in neuropsychology, as well as outlining benefits of participation in this process. It is hoped that the current information will encourage individuals at all levels to become involved in peer-reviewing for neuropsychology journals.
    Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 08/2009; 24(3):201-7. · 2.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Decrements in cognitive function are common in cancer patients and other clinical populations. As direct neuropsychological testing is often not feasible or affordable, there is potential utility in screening for deficits that may warrant a more comprehensive neuropsychological assessment. Furthermore, some evidence suggests that perceived cognitive function (PCF) is independently associated with structural and functional changes on neuroimagery, and may precede more overt deficits. To appropriately measure PCF, one must understand its components and the underlying dimensional structure. The purpose of this study was to examine the dimensionality of PCF in people with cancer. The sample included 393 cancer patients from four clinical trials who completed a questionnaire consisting of the prioritized areas of concerns identified by patients and clinicians: self-reported mental acuity, concentration, memory, verbal fluency, and functional interference. Each area contained both negatively worded (i.e., deficit) and positively worded (i.e., capability) items. Data were analyzed by using Cronbach's alpha, item-total correlations, one-factor confirmatory factor analysis, and a bi-factor analysis model. Results indicated that perceived cognitive problem items are distinct from cognitive capability items, supporting a two-factor structure of PCF. Scoring of PCF based on these two factors should lead to improved assessment of PCF for people with cancer.
    Journal of pain and symptom management 07/2009; 37(6):982-95. · 2.42 Impact Factor
  • The Journal of head trauma rehabilitation 01/2009; 24(5):413-4; discussion 414-8, author reply 418-9. · 2.39 Impact Factor
  • Jerry J. Sweet, John H. King
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    ABSTRACT: The Category Test (CatT) has been one of the most frequently administered neuropsychological tests for many years, in common usage with traumatic brain injury patients and in forensic cases. Since 1985 there have been a number of attempts to delineate the performances of brain injury simulators and malingerers. The present paper reviews the history of these attempts, with particular attention to the CatT validity indicators developed by Bolter (1985) and by Tenhula and Sweet (1996). Similarities and differences between studies are discussed and clinical practice recommendations and limitations are enumerated. In keeping with the universal recommendations for effort tests and validity indicators from reviews of the neuropsychological malingering literature in the last 12 years, CatT validity indicators should not be viewed in isolation. Rather, they should be considered primarily with regard to validity of CatT results and as one source of relevant information in the detection of insufficient effort and the ultimate complex judgment, among a subset of insufficient effort cases, that the cause is malingering. Implications for meeting Daubert evidentiary standards are discussed.
    Journal of Forensic Neuropsychology 10/2008; 3(1):241-274.
  • Jerry J. Sweet, Mark A. Moulthrop
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    ABSTRACT: As clinical neuropsychologists engage more frequently in assessment of potentially adversarial administrative or legal cases, there is a need to address more carefully the potential for personal bias that may develop as a result of either conscious or unconscious responses to the powerful influences operating within such cases. The present paper describes a heuristic approach directed toward increasing the clinician's objectivity in rendering opinions in adversarial cases that rests upon self-examination questions. The authors contend that greater awareness of the expectations of objectivity, ifclearly and explicitly operationalized, will allow clinical neuropsychologists to work conscientiously to reduce possible bias in their expert opinions.
    Journal of Forensic Neuropsychology. 10/2008; 1(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Forensic neuropsychological practice is associated with a series of unique ethical issues. This article discusses ethical issues specifically relevant to relationships in forensic neuropsychology. We begin with the initial contact with the retaining party, and go on to discuss differences between being a “treater” versus a retained expert, role transitions, and issues of informed consent and confidentiality, finally concluding with practitioner-practitioner interactions. Though there have been changes in ethics codes across time, fundamental perspectives on relationships within the context of clinical and forensic activities have for the most part remained unchanged. Neuropsychologists engaged in forensic practice need to be aware of key differences between routine clinical and forensic practice.
    Journal of Forensic Neuropsychology. 10/2008; 4(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Neuropsychologists routinely rely on response validity measures to evaluate the authenticity of test performances. However, the relationship between cognitive and psychological response validity measures is not clearly understood. It remains to be seen whether psychological test results can predict the outcome of response validity testing in clinical and civil forensic samples. The present analysis applied a unique statistical approach, classification tree methodology (Optimal Data Analysis: ODA), in a sample of 307 individuals who had completed the MMPI-2 and a variety of cognitive effort measures. One hundred ninety-eight participants were evaluated in a secondary gain context, and 109 had no identifiable secondary gain. Through recurrent dichotomous discriminations, ODA provided optimized linear decision trees to classify either sufficient effort (SE) or insufficient effort (IE) according to various MMPI-2 scale cutoffs. After of an initial, complex classification tree, the Response Bias Scale (RBS) took precedence in classifying cognitive effort. After removing RBS from the model, Hy took precedence in classifying IE. The present findings provide MMPI-2 scores that may be associated with SE and IE among civil litigants and claimants, in addition to illustrating the complexity with which MMPI-2 scores and effort test results are associated in the litigation context.
    Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society 10/2008; 14(5):842-52. · 2.70 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
148.49 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011–2014
    • NorthShore University HealthSystem
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 2013
    • University of Chicago
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 2009
    • Wayne State University
      Detroit, Michigan, United States
  • 2008
    • Southern Illinois Healthcare
      Illinois, United States
  • 1995–2007
    • Northwestern University
      • • Feinberg School of Medicine
      • • Department of Psychology
      Evanston, IL, United States
  • 2006
    • University of North Carolina at Charlotte
      Charlotte, North Carolina, United States
  • 2000
    • Cook County Hospital
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 1980–1981
    • Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center
      Chicago, Illinois, United States