Silke Szymczak

University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany

Are you Silke Szymczak?

Claim your profile

Publications (30)167.31 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the impact of functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) pathways involved in the ROS pathway, DNA repair, or TGFB1 signaling on acute or late normal toxicity as well as individual radiosensitivity.
    Strahlentherapie und Onkologie : Organ der Deutschen Rontgengesellschaft ... [et al]. 08/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Chromosomal aneuploidy has been identified as a prognostic factor in the majority of sporadic carcinomas. However, it is not known how chromosomal aneuploidy affects chromosome-specific protein expression in particular, and the cellular proteome equilibrium in general. The aim was to detect chromosomal aneuploidy-associated expression changes in cell clones carrying trisomies found in colorectal cancer. We used microcell-mediated chromosomal transfer to generate three artificial trisomic cell clones of the karyotypically stable, diploid, yet mismatch-deficient, colorectal cancer cell line DLD1 - each of them harboring one extra copy of either chromosome 3, 7 or 13. Protein expression differences were assessed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, compared to whole-genome gene expression data, and evaluated by PANTHER classification system and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). In total, 79 differentially expressed proteins were identified between the trisomic clones and the parental cell line. Up-regulation of PCNA and HMGB1 as well as down-regulation of IDH3A and PSMB3 were revealed as trisomy-associated alterations involved in regulating genome stability. These results show that trisomies affect the expression of genes and proteins that are not necessarily located on the trisomic chromosome, but reflect a pathway-related alteration of the cellular equilibrium.
    Analytical cellular pathology (Amsterdam) 01/2014; · 0.92 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A large-scale RNAi screen was performed for 8 different melanoma cell lines using a pooled whole genome lentiviral shRNA library. shRNAs affecting proliferation of transduced melanoma cells were negatively selected during 10 days of culture. Overall, 617 shRNAs were identified by microarray hybridization. Pathway analyses identified mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway members such as ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and MAP3K7 and protein kinase Cβ (PKCβ) as candidate genes. Knockdown of PKCβ most consistently reduced cellular proliferation, colony formation and migratory capacity of melanoma cells and was selected for further validation. PKCβ showed enhanced expression in human primary melanomas and distant metastases as compared with benign melanocytic nevi. Moreover, treatment of melanoma cells with PKCβ-specific inhibitor enzastaurin reduced melanoma cell growth but had only small effects on benign fibroblasts. Finally, PKCβ-shRNA significantly reduced lung colonisation capacity of stably transduced melanoma cells in mice. Taken together, the present study identified new candidate genes for melanoma cell growth and proliferation. PKCβ seems to play an important role in these processes and might serve as a new target for treatment of metastatic melanoma. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research 01/2014; · 5.84 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies are performed to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms that modify average expression values of genes, proteins, or metabolites, depending on the genotype. As expression values are often not normally distributed, statistical methods for eQTL studies should be valid and powerful in these situations. Adaptive tests are promising alternatives to standard approaches, such as the analysis of variance or the Kruskal-Wallis test. In a two-stage procedure, skewness and tail length of the distributions are estimated and used to select one of several linear rank tests. In this study, we compare two adaptive tests that were proposed in the literature using extensive Monte Carlo simulations of a wide range of different symmetric and skewed distributions. We derive a new adaptive test that combines the advantages of both literature-based approaches. The new test does not require the user to specify a distribution. It is slightly less powerful than the locally most powerful rank test for the correct distribution and at least as powerful as the maximin efficiency robust rank test. We illustrate the application of all tests using two examples from different eQTL studies. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Statistics in Medicine 08/2012; · 2.04 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To examine the association of polymorphisms in ATM (codon 158), GSTP1 (codon 105), SOD2 (codon 16), TGFB1 (position -509), XPD (codon 751), and XRCC1 (codon 399) with the risk of severe erythema after breast conserving radiotherapy. Retrospective analysis of 83 breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving radiotherapy. A total dose of 50.4 Gy was administered, applying 1.8 Gy/fraction within 42 days. Erythema was evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score. DNA was extracted from blood samples and polymorphisms were determined using either the Polymerase Chain Reaction based Restriction-Fragment-Length-Polymorphism (PCR-RFL) technique or Matrix-Assisted-Laser-Desorption/Ionization -Time-Of-Flight-Mass-Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). Relative excess heterozygosity (REH) was investigated to check compatibility of genotype frequencies with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). In addition, p-values from the standard exact HWE lack of fit test were calculated using 100,000 permutations. HWE analyses were performed using R. Fifty-six percent (46/83) of all patients developed erythema of grade 2 or 3, with this risk being higher for patients with large breast volume (odds ratio, OR = 2.55, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.03-6.31, p = 0.041). No significant association between SNPs and risk of erythema was found when all patients were considered. However, in patients with small breast volume the TGFB1 SNP was associated with erythema (p = 0.028), whereas the SNP in XPD showed an association in patients with large breast volume (p = 0.046). A risk score based on all risk alleles was neither significant in all patients nor in patients with small or large breast volume. Risk alleles of most SNPs were different compared to a previously identified risk profile for fibrosis. The genetic risk profile for erythema appears to be different for patients with small and larger breast volume. This risk profile seems to be specific for erythema as compared to a risk profile for fibrosis.
    Radiation Oncology 04/2012; 7:65. · 2.11 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The mechanisms underlying the transformation from chronic Helicobacter pylori gastritis to gastric extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (MALT lymphoma) are poorly understood. This study aims to identify microRNAs that might be involved in the process of neoplastic transformation. We generated microRNA signatures by RT-PCR in 68 gastric biopsy samples representing normal mucosa, gastritis, suspicious lymphoid infiltrates, and overt MALT lymphoma according to Wotherspoon criteria. Analyses revealed a total of 41 microRNAs that were significantly upregulated (n = 33) or downregulated (n = 8) in succession from normal mucosa to gastritis and to MALT lymphoma. While some of these merely reflect the presence of lymphocytes (e.g. miR-566 and miR-212) or H. pylori infection (e.g. miR-155 and let7f), a distinct set of five microRNAs (miR-150, miR-550, miR-124a, miR-518b and miR-539) was shown to be differentially expressed in gastritis as opposed to MALT lymphoma. This differential expression might therefore indicate a central role of these microRNAs in the process of malignant transformation.
    Archiv für Pathologische Anatomie und Physiologie und für Klinische Medicin 03/2012; 460(4):371-7. · 2.68 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: One major expectation from the transcriptome in humans is to characterize the biological basis of associations identified by genome-wide association studies. So far, few cis expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) have been reliably related to disease susceptibility. Trans-regulating mechanisms may play a more prominent role in disease susceptibility. We analyzed 12,808 genes detected in at least 5% of circulating monocyte samples from a population-based sample of 1,490 European unrelated subjects. We applied a method of extraction of expression patterns-independent component analysis-to identify sets of co-regulated genes. These patterns were then related to 675,350 SNPs to identify major trans-acting regulators. We detected three genomic regions significantly associated with co-regulated gene modules. Association of these loci with multiple expression traits was replicated in Cardiogenics, an independent study in which expression profiles of monocytes were available in 758 subjects. The locus 12q13 (lead SNP rs11171739), previously identified as a type 1 diabetes locus, was associated with a pattern including two cis eQTLs, RPS26 and SUOX, and 5 trans eQTLs, one of which (MADCAM1) is a potential candidate for mediating T1D susceptibility. The locus 12q24 (lead SNP rs653178), which has demonstrated extensive disease pleiotropy, including type 1 diabetes, hypertension, and celiac disease, was associated to a pattern strongly correlating to blood pressure level. The strongest trans eQTL in this pattern was CRIP1, a known marker of cellular proliferation in cancer. The locus 12q15 (lead SNP rs11177644) was associated with a pattern driven by two cis eQTLs, LYZ and YEATS4, and including 34 trans eQTLs, several of them tumor-related genes. This study shows that a method exploiting the structure of co-expressions among genes can help identify genomic regions involved in trans regulation of sets of genes and can provide clues for understanding the mechanisms linking genome-wide association loci to disease.
    PLoS Genetics 12/2011; 7(12):e1002367. · 8.52 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: DNA aneuploidy has been identified as a prognostic factor in the majority of epithelial malignancies. We aimed at identifying ploidy-associated protein expression in endometrial cancer of different prognostic subgroups. Comparison of gel electrophoresis-based protein expression patterns between normal endometrium (n = 5), diploid (n = 7), and aneuploid (n = 7) endometrial carcinoma detected 121 ploidy-associated protein forms, 42 differentially expressed between normal endometrium and diploid endometrioid carcinomas, 37 between diploid and aneuploid endometrioid carcinomas, and 41 between diploid endometrioid and aneuploid uterine papillary serous cancer. Proteins were identified by mass spectrometry and evaluated by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Targets were confirmed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry identified 41 distinct polypeptides and pathway analysis resulted in high-ranked networks with vimentin and Nf-κB as central nodes. These results identify ploidy-associated protein expression differences that overrule histopathology-associated expression differences and emphasize particular protein networks in genomic stability of endometrial cancer.
    Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences CMLS 07/2011; 69(2):325-33. · 5.62 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In humans, the fraction of X-linked genes with higher expression in females has been estimated to be 5% from microarray studies, a proportion lower than the 25% of genes thought to escape X inactivation. We analyzed 715 X-linked transcripts in circulating monocytes from 1,467 subjects and found an excess of female-biased transcripts on the X compared to autosomes (9.4% vs 5.5%, p<2×10(-5)). Among the genes not previously known to escape inactivation, the most significant one was EFHC2 whose 20% of variability was explained by sex. We also investigated cis expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) by analyzing 15,703 X-linked SNPs. The frequency and magnitude of X-linked cis eQTLs were quite similar in males and females. Few genes exhibited a stronger genetic effect in females than in males (ARSD, DCX, POLA1 and ITM2A). These genes would deserve further investigation since they may contribute to sex pathophysiological differences.
    Genomics 07/2011; 98(5):320-6. · 3.01 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: eQTL analyses are important to improve the understanding of genetic association results. We performed a genome-wide association and global gene expression study to identify functionally relevant variants affecting the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). In a genome-wide association analysis of 2078 CAD cases and 2953 control subjects, we identified 950 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were associated with CAD at P<10(-3). Subsequent in silico and wet-laboratory replication stages and a final meta-analysis of 21 428 CAD cases and 38 361 control subjects revealed a novel association signal at chromosome 10q23.31 within the LIPA (lysosomal acid lipase A) gene (P=3.7×10(-8); odds ratio, 1.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.14). The association of this locus with global gene expression was assessed by genome-wide expression analyses in the monocyte transcriptome of 1494 individuals. The results showed a strong association of this locus with expression of the LIPA transcript (P=1.3×10(-96)). An assessment of LIPA SNPs and transcript with cardiovascular phenotypes revealed an association of LIPA transcript levels with impaired endothelial function (P=4.4×10(-3)). The use of data on genetic variants and the addition of data on global monocytic gene expression led to the identification of the novel functional CAD susceptibility locus LIPA, located on chromosome 10q23.31. The respective eSNPs associated with CAD strongly affect LIPA gene expression level, which was related to endothelial dysfunction, a precursor of CAD.
    Circulation Cardiovascular Genetics 05/2011; 4(4):403-12. · 6.73 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: DNA aneuploidy has been identified as a prognostic factor for epithelial malignancies. Further understanding of the translation of DNA aneuploidy into protein expression will help to define novel biomarkers to improve therapies and prognosis. DNA ploidy was assessed by image cytometry. Comparison of gel-electrophoresis-based protein expression patterns of three diploid and four aneuploid colorectal cancer cell lines detected 64 ploidy-associated proteins. Proteins were identified by mass spectrometry and subjected to Ingenuity Pathway Analysis resulting in two overlapping high-ranked networks maintaining Cellular Assembly and Organization, Cell Cycle, and Cellular Growth and Proliferation. CAPZA1, TXNL1, and HDAC2 were significantly validated by Western blotting in cell lines and the latter two showed expression differences also in clinical samples using a tissue microarray of normal mucosa (n=19), diploid (n=31), and aneuploid (n=47) carcinomas. The results suggest that distinct protein expression patterns, affecting TXNL1 and HDAC2, distinguish aneuploid with poor prognosis from diploid colorectal cancers.
    Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences CMLS 02/2011; 68(19):3261-74. · 5.62 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Combined analyses of gene networks and DNA sequence variation can provide new insights into the aetiology of common diseases that may not be apparent from genome-wide association studies alone. Recent advances in rat genomics are facilitating systems-genetics approaches. Here we report the use of integrated genome-wide approaches across seven rat tissues to identify gene networks and the loci underlying their regulation. We defined an interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7)-driven inflammatory network (IDIN) enriched for viral response genes, which represents a molecular biomarker for macrophages and which was regulated in multiple tissues by a locus on rat chromosome 15q25. We show that Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (Ebi2, also known as Gpr183), which lies at this locus and controls B lymphocyte migration, is expressed in macrophages and regulates the IDIN. The human orthologous locus on chromosome 13q32 controlled the human equivalent of the IDIN, which was conserved in monocytes. IDIN genes were more likely to associate with susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D)-a macrophage-associated autoimmune disease-than randomly selected immune response genes (P = 8.85 × 10(-6)). The human locus controlling the IDIN was associated with the risk of T1D at single nucleotide polymorphism rs9585056 (P = 7.0 × 10(-10); odds ratio, 1.15), which was one of five single nucleotide polymorphisms in this region associated with EBI2 (GPR183) expression. These data implicate IRF7 network genes and their regulatory locus in the pathogenesis of T1D.
    Nature 09/2010; 467(7314):460-4. · 38.60 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Comparing the chromosomal radiosensitivity of prostate cancer patients with that of healthy donors. The study was performed on 81 prostate cancer patients characterised by a clinical stage of predominantly pT2c or pT3a and a median age of 67 years. As healthy donors 60 male monozygotic twin pairs were recruited with a median age of 28 years. Chromosomal radiosensitivity was measured using both G0- and G2-assay. No difference between healthy donors and prostate cancer patients was detected concerning G0-radiosensitivity, since medians were similar (Hodges-Lehmann estimate: -0.05, 95% CI: -0.18-0.08, p=0.4167). However, a pronounced difference was determined for G2-radiosensitivity with prostate cancer patients showing a significantly higher sensitivity compared to healthy donors (Hodges-Lehmann estimate: -0.41, 95% CI: -0.53 to -0.30, p=1.75(-9)). Using the 90% quantile of G2-radiosensitivity in healthy donors as a threshold for discrimination the fraction of prostate cancer patients with elevated radiosensitivity increased to 49%. G2-, but not G0-radiosensitivity is a promising marker for predisposition of prostate cancer.
    Radiotherapy and Oncology 05/2010; 96(1):19-24. · 4.52 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To examine the association of polymorphisms in ATM (codon 158), GSTP1 (codon 105), SOD2 (codon 16), TGFB1 (position -509), XPD (codon 751), and XRCC1 (codon 399) with fibrosis and also individual radiosensitivity. Retrospective analysis with 69 breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving radiotherapy; total dose delivered was restricted to vary between 54 and 55Gy. Fibrosis was evaluated according to LENT/SOMA score. DNA was extracted from blood samples; cellular radiosensitivity was measured using the G0 assay and polymorphisms by PCR-RFLP and MALDI-TOF, respectively. Twenty-five percent of all patients developed fibrosis of grade 2 or 3. This proportion tends to be higher in patients being polymorphic in TGFB1 or XRCC1 when compared to patients with wildtype genotype, whereas for ATM, GSTP1, SOD2 and XPD the polymorphic genotype appears to be associated with a lower risk of fibrosis. However, none of these associations are significant. In contrast, when a risk score is calculated based on all risk alleles, there was significant association with an increased risk of fibrosis (per risk allele odds ratio (ORs)=2.09, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32-3.55, p=0.0005). All six polymorphisms were found to have no significant effect on cellular radiosensitivity. It is most likely that risk for radiation-induced fibrosis can be assessed by a combination of risk alleles. This finding needs to be replicated in further studies.
    Radiotherapy and Oncology 02/2010; 97(1):26-32. · 4.52 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Variability of gene expression in human may link gene sequence variability and phenotypes; however, non-genetic variations, alone or in combination with genetics, may also influence expression traits and have a critical role in physiological and disease processes. To get better insight into the overall variability of gene expression, we assessed the transcriptome of circulating monocytes, a key cell involved in immunity-related diseases and atherosclerosis, in 1,490 unrelated individuals and investigated its association with >675,000 SNPs and 10 common cardiovascular risk factors. Out of 12,808 expressed genes, 2,745 expression quantitative trait loci were detected (P<5.78x10(-12)), most of them (90%) being cis-modulated. Extensive analyses showed that associations identified by genome-wide association studies of lipids, body mass index or blood pressure were rarely compatible with a mediation by monocyte expression level at the locus. At a study-wide level (P<3.9x10(-7)), 1,662 expression traits (13.0%) were significantly associated with at least one risk factor. Genome-wide interaction analyses suggested that genetic variability and risk factors mostly acted additively on gene expression. Because of the structure of correlation among expression traits, the variability of risk factors could be characterized by a limited set of independent gene expressions which may have biological and clinical relevance. For example expression traits associated with cigarette smoking were more strongly associated with carotid atherosclerosis than smoking itself. This study demonstrates that the monocyte transcriptome is a potent integrator of genetic and non-genetic influences of relevance for disease pathophysiology and risk assessment.
    PLoS ONE 01/2010; 5(5):e10693. · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recently, genome-wide association studies have substantially expanded our knowledge about genetic variants that influence the susceptibility to complex diseases. Although standard statistical tests for each single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) separately are able to capture main genetic effects, different approaches are necessary to identify SNPs that influence disease risk jointly or in complex interactions. Experimental and simulated genome-wide SNP data provided by the Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 afforded an opportunity to analyze the applicability and benefit of several machine learning methods. Penalized regression, ensemble methods, and network analyses resulted in several new findings while known and simulated genetic risk variants were also identified. In conclusion, machine learning approaches are promising complements to standard single-and multi-SNP analysis methods for understanding the overall genetic architecture of complex human diseases. However, because they are not optimized for genome-wide SNP data, improved implementations and new variable selection procedures are required.
    Genetic Epidemiology 11/2009; 33 Suppl 1:S51-7. · 4.02 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: AT(1) blockers attenuate hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis reactivity in hypertension independently of their potency to lower blood pressure. A reduced pituitary sensitivity to CRH and a downregulation of hypothalamic CRH expression have been suggested to influence HPA axis activity during chronic AT(1) blockade. This study was aimed at confirming the role of central angiotensin II in regulating HPA reactivity by using the transgenic rat TGR(ASrAOGEN), a model featuring low levels of brain angiotensinogen. Different stress tests were performed to determine HPA reactivity in TGR(ASrAOGEN) and appropriate controls. In TGR(ASrAOGEN), blood pressure was diminished compared to controls. The corticosterone response to a CRH or ACTH challenge and a forced swim test was more distinct in TGR(ASrAOGEN) than it was in controls and occurred independently of a concurrent enhancement in ACTH. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we found increased mRNA levels of melanocortin 2 (Mc2r) and AT(2) receptors (Agtr2) in the adrenals of TGR(ASrAOGEN), whereas mRNA levels of Crh, Pomc, and AT(1) receptors (Agtr1) remained unchanged in hypothalami and pituitary glands. Since stress responses were increased rather than attenuated in TGR(ASrAOGEN), we conclude that the reduced HPA reactivity during AT(1) blockade could not be mimicked in a specific transgenic rat model featuring a centrally inactivated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The ACTH independency of the enhanced corticosterone release during CRH test and the enhanced corticosterone response to ACTH rather indicates an adrenal mechanism. The upregulation of adrenal MC2 and AT(2) receptors seems to be involved in the stimulated facilitation of adrenal corticosterone release for effectuating the stimulated stress responses.
    Journal of Endocrinology 10/2009; 204(1):85-92. · 4.06 Impact Factor
  • S Szymczak, B-W Igl, A Ziegler
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Single nucleotide polymorphism-gene expression associations have received increasing interest. The aim of these studies is discovering a difference in the location parameters of gene expressions given genotype. Because gene expressions often are highly skewed, heavy-tailed or data of different genotypes vary in dispersion, the median is the most appropriate measure of location. In this case, model assumptions of standard statistical methods for comparing locations such as the analysis of variance (ANOVA) or the Kruskal-Wallis (KW) test are violated. Alternatives that might be more appropriate are the median test (MED) and tests based on mutual information (MI). In simulation studies these approaches and a novel MI test are compared with ANOVA and KW. Location, dispersion and skewness parameters of the gene expression distributions given genotypes are varied as well as genotype frequencies. The MED test and the novel MI-based method keep the nominal significance levels for comparing medians if gene expression data are non-normally distributed. ANOVA and KW have substantially inflated type I errors. They are, however, optimal if standard model assumptions are fulfilled. The MED test generally has larger power than MI and is therefore recommended if model assumptions of standard procedures are violated. A 300 kb region on chromosome 9p21.3, which is associated with coronary artery disease, was analyzed using the HapMap data. Only the alternative approaches were able to identify three genes (ADM, FCGR3B and ADORA1) as promising candidates to clarify the molecular mechanism of the genetic association.
    Statistics in Medicine 08/2009; 28(29):3581-96. · 2.04 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT : Genome-wide association studies have become standard in genetic epidemiology. Analyzing hundreds of thousands of markers simultaneously imposes some challenges for statisticians. One issue is the problem of multiplicity, which has been compared with the search for the needle in a haystack. To reduce the number of false-positive findings, a number of quality filters such as exclusion of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with a high missing fraction are employed. Another filter is exclusion of SNPs for which the calling algorithm had difficulties in assigning the genotypes. The only way to do this is the visual inspection of the cluster plots, also termed signal intensity plots, but this approach is often neglected. We developed an algorithm ACPA (automated cluster plot analysis), which performs this task automatically for autosomal SNPs. It is based on counting samples that lie too close to the cluster of a different genotype; SNPs are excluded when a certain threshold is exceeded. We evaluated ACPA using 1,000 randomly selected quality controlled SNPs from the Framingham Heart Study data that were provided for the Genetic Analysis Workshop 16. We compared the decision of ACPA with the decision made by two independent readers. We achieved a sensitivity of 88% (95% CI: 81%-93%) and a specificity of 86% (95% CI: 83%-89%). In a screening setting in which one aims at not losing any good SNP, we achieved 99% (95% CI: 98%-100%) specificity and still detected every second low-quality SNP.
    BMC proceedings 01/2009; 3 Suppl 7:S58.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT : Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have helped to reveal genetic mechanisms of complex diseases. Although commonly used genotyping technology enables us to determine up to a million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), causative variants are typically not genotyped directly. A favored approach to increase the power of genome-wide association studies is to impute the untyped SNPs using more complete genotype data of a reference population.Random forests (RF) provides an internal method for replacing missing genotypes. A forest of classification trees is used to determine similarities of probands regarding their genotypes. These proximities are then used to impute genotypes of untyped SNPs.We evaluated this approach using genotype data of the Framingham Heart Study provided as Problem 2 for Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 and the Caucasian HapMap samples as reference population. Our results indicate that RFs are faster but less accurate than alternative approaches for imputing untyped SNPs.
    BMC proceedings 01/2009; 3 Suppl 7:S65.

Publication Stats

1k Citations
167.31 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • University of Hamburg
      • Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology
      Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
  • 2009–2012
    • Universität zu Lübeck
      • • Institut für Medizinische Biometrie und Statistik
      • • Department of Surgery
      Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
  • 2011
    • University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein
      Kiel, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
  • 2008
    • University Medical Center Hamburg - Eppendorf
      • Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology
      Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany