E Feráková

Comenius University in Bratislava, Bratislava, Bratislavsky Kraj, Slovakia

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Publications (15)41.94 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I (CN I) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder due to hepatic dysfunction of uridine diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity toward bilirubin. Complete inactivation of this enzyme causing CN I lead to accumulation of unconjugated bilirubin in serum and bile. Here we report the results of the molecular characterization of the uridine diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) gene in a consanguineous family of Slovak Roms and an unrelated non-Romany family with CN I. Sequence analysis of UGT1A1 gene in all four Romany patients showed mutation in exon 4, a deletion of an A at codon 407 (1220delA), not yet described in homozygous status. All analysed patients were homozygous for 1220delA mutation and their 3 healthy sibs were heterozygous. The non-Romany patient was a compound heterozygote for two different deletions, 1220delA and 717-718delAG at codon 239. In the family of his cousin a son was born affected with CN I, who was homozygote for 717-718delAG mutation. His other niece affected with CN II was heterozygote for mutation 717-718delAG but homozygote for TA insertion and enhancer substitution T-3279G. Haplotype analysis suggests that the 1220delA mutation is identical by descent in both families, though they originate from two ethnically different populations (Slovaks vs. Roms).
    General Physiology and Biophysics 01/2008; 26(4):306-10. · 0.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of hepatic copper metabolism caused by mutations in a gene encoding a copper-transporting P-type ATPase, ATP7B. The majority of known mutations affecting this gene are frequent in different populations, which may help to introduce rapid diagnostic procedures based on direct DNA analysis into routine clinical practise. The His1069Gln mutation in exon 14 is the most frequent one, accounting for 30-60% of all mutations in Caucasian patients. The aim of the present work was to introduce DNA-based direct analysis into routine molecular screening for the above mutation in Slovak WD patients and to assess its frequency in patients as well as in a control population. Twenty seven clinicaly diagnosed patients from twenty five families, twenty relatives of index patients and three hundred and six control DNA samples were tested using two different DNA-based methods: the earlier described amplification created restriction site (ACRS) for Alw21I in combination with nested PCR and the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS). In 18 of 25 unrelated patients (72%), the mentioned genetic defect was present in at least one copy. In ten of them (40%), the above mutation was detected in homozygous and in eight individuals (32%) in heterozygous state. In seven WD patients (28%), this mutation was not detected. The allele frequency of His1069Gln in Slovak patients with WD was 56%, which was higher as reported in other populations. In a control group of 306 random DNA samples (612 alleles), the His1069Gln mutation was observed in 3 samples (carrier frequency 1%; allele frequency 0.49%). These frequencies correspond to figures observed in different population of European origin. Taken together, we have provided further evidence that the His1069Gln mutation is the prevalent ATP7B mutation in central-european WD patients. Although both methods used in this study worked in our hands reliably, there are in every-day use some drawbacks and limitations inherent to them (PCR reactions in two tubes, possibility of star activity or not complet digestion by restriction endonuclease, etc.). Therefore we developed a simpler, cost effective and rapid DNA diagnostic test based on bidirectional amplification of specific alleles (BI-PASA), which enables detection of homozygotes (wild and mutant) and heterozygotes, respectivelly, in one PCR reaction. The test was highly sensitive and specific, yielding no false-positive or false-negative results. Its reliability and discriminating power was tested on samples of 27 WD patients and 120 random control DNA's, previously genotyped by above mentioned methods. Comparing results of BI-PASA with ACRS and ARMS tests showed 100% concordance.
    General Physiology and Biophysics 07/2007; 26(2):91-6. · 0.85 Impact Factor
  • Clinical Genetics 01/2006; 68(6):554-7. · 3.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mutations in the GJB2 gene (connexin 26) represent a major cause of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL) worldwide. In most Caucasian populations, the 35delG mutation in this gene was found to account for up to 50% of cases of the genetic non-syndromic childhood deafness. In populations of non-European ethnic background, other GJB2 gene mutations are occasionally common, e.g. 167delT in Ashkenazi Jews, R143W in Africaans and 235delC in Koreans. In this work, DNA samples from 54 unrelated NSHL patients from endogamous and inbred population of Slovak Roms (Gypsies) from Eastern Slovakia were screened for GJB2 mutations. The coding region of the GJB2 gene of patients was sequenced and mutations W24X, R127H, V153I, L90P and V37I were found. In Slovak Romany population, mutation W24X accounts for 23.2%, R127H for 19.4%, 35delG for 8.3%, V153I for 3.7%, L90P for 3.7% and V37I for 0.9% of screened chromosomes. As the W24X mutation was previously found in India and Pakistan, were from the European Romanies originate, it was brought by the European Romnanies from their Indian homeland. The carrier frequency of 35delG was estimated for Slovak non-Romany population to be 3.3%, and for Slovak Romany population to 0.88%. The carrier frequency of W24X varied in different Slovak Romany subpopulations from 0.0% up to 26.1%.
    General Physiology and Biophysics 01/2004; 22(4):549-56. · 0.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase (HGO) activity. The disease is characterized by homogentisic aciduria, ochronosis and ochronotic arthritis. AKU shows a very low prevalence (1:250 000), in most ethnic groups. Altogether 43 HGO mutations have been identified in approximately 100 patients. In Slovakia, however, the incidence of this disorder rises up to 1:19 000, and 10 different AKU mutations have been identified in this relatively small country. Here, we report detection methods developed for rapid identification of five HGO mutations. PCR primers were designed enabling detection of mutations IVS5 + 1G-->A, R58fs, and V300G by restriction digestion of amplification-created restriction sites (ACRS). Mutation G152fs is readily identified by heteroduplex analysis, and G161R by amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) PCR.
    Clinical Genetics 02/2003; 63(2):145-9. · 3.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase (HGO) activity. AKU shows a very low prevalence (1:100,000-250,000) in most ethnic groups. One notable exception is in Slovakia, where the incidence of AKU rises to 1:19,000. This high incidence is difficult to explain by a classical founder effect, because as many as 10 different AKU mutations have been identified in this relatively small country. We have determined the allelic associations of 11 HGO intragenic polymorphisms for 44 AKU chromosomes from 20 Slovak pedigrees. These data were compared to the HGO haplotype data available in our laboratory for >80 AKU chromosomes from different European and non-European countries. The results show that common European AKU chromosomes have had only a marginal contribution to the Slovak AKU gene pool. Six of the ten Slovak AKU mutations, including the prevalent G152fs, G161R, G270R, and P370fs mutations, most likely originated in Slovakia. Data available for 17 Slovak AKU pedigrees indicate that most of the AKU chromosomes have their origins in a single very small region in the Carpathian mountains, in the northwestern part of the country. Since all six Slovak AKU mutations are associated with HGO mutational hot spots, we suggest that an increased mutation rate at the HGO gene is responsible for the clustering of AKU mutations in such a small geographical region.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 11/2000; 67(5):1333-9. · 11.20 Impact Factor
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    Journal of Medical Genetics 08/2000; 37(7):539-42. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    Journal of Medical Genetics - J MED GENET. 01/2000; 37(7):539-542.
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    ABSTRACT: Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) is an autosomal recessive eye disease that occurs at an unusually high frequency in the ethnic isolate of Roms (Gypsies) in Slovakia. Recently, we linked the disease in this population to the GLC3A locus on 2p21. At this locus, mutations in the cytochrome P4501B1 (CYP1B1) gene have been identified as a molecular basis for this condition. Here, we report the results of CYP1B1 mutation screening of 43 PCG patients from 26 Slovak Rom families. A homozygous G-->A transition at nucleotide 1505 in the highly conserved region of exon 3 was detected in all families. This mutation results in the E387K substitution, which affects the conserved K helix region of the cytochrome P450 molecule. Determination of the CYP1B1 polymorphic background showed a common DNA haplotype in all patients, thus indicating that the E387K mutation in Roms has originated from a single ancestral mutational event. The Slovak Roms represent the first population in which PCG is found to result from a single mutation in the CYP1B1 gene, so that a founder effect is the most plausible explanation of its increased incidence. An ARMS-PCR assay has been developed for fast detection of this mutation, thus allowing direct DNA based prenatal diagnosis as well as gene carrier detection in this particular population. Screening of 158 healthy Roms identified 17 (10.8%) mutation carriers, indicating that the frequency of PCG in this population may be even higher than originally estimated.
    Journal of Medical Genetics 04/1999; 36(4):290-4. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The autosomal recessive form of primary congenital glaucoma (gene symbol GLC3) has been recently mapped to two different loci, GLC3A (at 2p21), and GLC3B (at 1p36), respectively, on families of Turkish and Saudi Arabian provenance. This disorder is known to occur with an extremely high incidence in Roms (Gypsies) in Slovakia. We performed a standard linkage analysis on a sample of 7 Slovak Gypsy families comprising 18 affected members, and found significant linkage with four STR markers from the chromosomal region of 2p21 (D2S1788, D2S1346, D2S2328, and D2S1356), without heterogeneity. This finding demonstrates that in the Rom population of Slovakia, primary congenital glaucoma is due to the locus GLC3A, and consequently, to the mutation(s) in the cytochrome P4501B1 gene, which has been recently identified as the principal cause of the disease. Roms represent the third population, in which the disorder has been mapped to GLC3A.
    Human Heredity 01/1998; 48(1):30-3. · 1.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the relative contributions of trans-acting factors (replication and repair functions) and cis-acting elements (repeat and flanking DNA composition) to the mechanism of trinucleotide repeat sequence mutation we have analysed the distribution of copy number polymorphisms at 12 loci associated with dynamic mutations in 15 populations of different ethnic origins. Genome wide instability of repeats in a particular population would be evidence of trans-acting factor instigation of the mutation process, whereas instability at a particular locus (perhaps even in several populations) would be evidence that the composition of the particular locus was the most significant factor contributing to mutation. The FRA16A locus is highly polymorphic in only the European population. Some other loci exhibit distinct distributions of alleles between different populations. Therefore sequences in the vicinity of the repeat -- the cis component of a particular locus -- appear(s) to be more important in the mutation mechanism than sporadic genome-wide instability induced by trans-acting factors such as the DNA mismatch repair enzymes.
    Annals of Human Genetics 10/1996; 60(Pt 5):391-400. · 2.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The restriction fragment length polymorphism haplotypes and seven common mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene were analysed in 49 unrelated Slovak phenylketonuria (PKU) families of Caucasian origin. The predominant mutation in this population sample is R408W, with a frequency of 45.9%. In addition, four other mutations have been identified at relatively high frequencies: IVS12nt1, 10.2%; R158Q, 7.1%; R261Q, 7.1%; R252W, 2.0%. The mutation-haplotype associations correspond to those described in other European populations. The high proportion of mutations (72.4%) amenable to simple rapid detection based on the polymerase chain reaction provides a good basis for direct DNA-diagnosis of PKU in the Slovak population.
    Human Genetics 02/1995; 95(1):112-4. · 4.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Amp-FLPs are simple and rapid tools for genetic characterization of both individuals and populations. This paper presents allele frequencies of four Amp-FLPs (ApoBII, MCT118, YNZ22, and COL2A1) based on the analysis of more than 100 unrelated Caucasoid Slovaks. The proportion of heterozygotes observed and expected, and the probability that two individuals taken at random from the population would be identical in a given polymorphism (PI), was determined for each Amp-FLP.
    Gene geography: a computerized bulletin on human gene frequencies 09/1994; 8(2):121-7.
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    ABSTRACT: Authors in this contribution present the results of screening for mutations in PAH gene responsible for classical phenylketonuria (PKU), and that of haplotype analysis, based on DNA analysis in 49 Caucasian families with at least one affected child from Slovak Republic. The clearly predominant PKU mutation in this population was the R408W with proportion of 45.9% among all PKU mutations. In addition four other mutations have been identified: IVS12nt1-10.2%, R158Q-7.1%, R261Q-7.1%, and R252W-2.0%. the overall proportion of identified PKU mutations equals 72.4%. Considering the fact, that these mutations are amenable to rapid and rather simple detection using PCR, the DNA analysis is recommended as a method of direct diagnosis in clinical practice as well as in prevention.
    Bratislavske lekarske listy 05/1994; 95(4):147-50. · 0.47 Impact Factor
  • Functional and developmental morphology 02/1992; 2(2):139-40.

Publication Stats

223 Citations
41.94 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1992–2008
    • Comenius University in Bratislava
      • • Department of Molecular Biology
      • • Department of Genetics
      Bratislava, Bratislavsky Kraj, Slovakia
  • 1995–2007
    • Slovak Academy of Sciences
      • Institute of Molecular Physiology and Genetics
      Bratislava, Bratislavsky Kraj, Slovakia