Murat Biteker

Istanbul Medipol University, İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey

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Publications (63)162.35 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Although ischemic stroke is a well-known complication of cardiovascular surgery it has not been extensively studied in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to assess the predictors and outcomes of perioperative acute ischemic stroke (PAIS) in patients undergoing noncardiothoracic, nonvascular surgery (NCS).
    Canadian journal of surgery. Journal canadien de chirurgie. 06/2014; 57(3):E55-61.
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    ABSTRACT: Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a form of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy affecting women in late pregnancy or early puerperium. Although initially described in the late 1800s, it has only recently been recognized as a distinct cardiac condition. The reported incidence and prognosis varies according to geography. The clinical course varies between complete recovery to rapid progression to chronic heart failure, heart transplantation or death. In spite of significant improvements in understanding the pathophysiology and management of the PPCM many features of this unique disease are poorly understood, including incidence, etiology, epidemiology, pathophysiology, predictors of prognosis and optimal therapy. The present article revisits these concepts and recent advances in PPCM.
    Current Cardiology Reviews 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between blood gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) levels and coronary collateral circulation in patients with chronic total occlusion (CTO). Two hundred twenty-two patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and CTO were included in this cross-sectional, observational study. Coronary collaterals were graded from 0 to 3 according to the Rentrop method. Patients with grade 0-1 collateral development were regarded as poor collateral group (n=66) while patients with grade 2-3 collateral development were regarded as good collateral group (n=156). Statistical analysis was performed using independent samples t, Mann-Whitney U and Chi-square tests, logistic regression and receiver operator curve analysis. The poor coronary collateral group had significantly higher levels of serum GGT compared to the good collateral group (p<0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that GGT levels were independent predictors of poor collateral circulation (OR-0.946, 95% CI=0.918-0.9719, p<0.001). The result of ROC curve analysis for GGT was as following: area under the ROC curve (AUC)=0.732, 95% CI: 0.622-0.841, p<0.001. Higher GGT levels are associated with poor coronary collateral circulation in patients with CTO. GGT may be used to predict the grade of coronary collateral circulation in CTO patients with chronic stable CAD.
    Anadolu kardiyoloji dergisi: AKD = the Anatolian journal of cardiology 10/2013; · 0.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence rate, identify the risk factors, and describe the clinical outcome of perioperative acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients undergoing noncardiac, nonvascular surgery (NCS). A total of 1,200 adult consecutive patients undergoing NCS were prospectively evaluated. Patients with pre-existing renal dysfunction were excluded. The primary outcome of this study was perioperative AKI defined by the RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss of function, and end-stage kidney disease) criteria. Eighty-one patients (6.7%) met the AKI criteria. Multivariate analysis identified age, diabetes, revised cardiac risk index, and American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status as independent predictors of AKI. Patients with AKI had more cardiovascular (33.3% vs 11.3%, P < .001) complications and a higher in-hospital mortality rate (6.1% vs 0.9%, P = .003) compared with patients without AKI. Several preoperative predictors are found to be associated with AKI after NCS. Perioperative AKI is an independent risk factor for outcome after NCS.
    American journal of surgery 09/2013; · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT) during pregnancy is life-threatening for mother and fetus, and the treatment of this complication is unclear. Cardiac surgery in pregnancy is associated with very high maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Thrombolytic therapy (TT) has been rarely used in these patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of low-dose (25 mg), slow infusion (6 hours) of t-PA (tissue plasminogen activator) for the treatment of PVT in pregnant women. Between 2004 and 2012, t-PA was administered to 24 consecutive women in 25 pregnancies with 28 PVT episodes (obstructive n=15; non-obstructive n=13). Mean age of the patients was 29±6 years. TT sessions were performed under transesophageal echocardiography guidance. The mean dose of t-PA used was 48.7±29.5 mg (range 25-100mg). All episodes resulted in complete thrombus lysis following TT. One patient had placental hemorrhage with preterm live birth occurred at 30(th) week, and one patient had minor bleeding. Low-dose, slow infusion of t-PA with repeated doses as needed is an effective therapy with excellent thrombolytic success rate for the treatment of PVT in pregnant women. This protocol also seems to be safer than cardiac surgery or any alternative medical strategies published to date. TT should be considered as first-line therapy in pregnant patients with PVT.
    Circulation 06/2013; · 15.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The study aimed to evaluate the prognostic role and discriminative power of aortic stiffness and plasma brain natriuretic peptide levels in a cohort of patients hospitalized for acute ischemic stroke. METHODS AND RESULTS: Three hundred and ten consecutive patients aged 50 years and older with a first episode of acute ischemic stroke were prospectively evaluated. All patients were admitted to the hospital within 24 h of the onset of stroke symptoms. The type of acute ischemic stroke was classified according to the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment classification. Blood samples were taken for measurement of brain natriuretic peptide levels at admission. Aortic stiffness indices, aortic strain and distensibility, were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by transthoracic echocardiography. The patients were followed for one-year or until death, whichever came first. Death occurred in 51 (16·5%) patients. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score >13, diabetes, brain natriuretic peptide >235 pg/mL, aortic distensibility, and aortic strain were associated with all-cause mortality. The optimal cutoff level of brain natriuretic peptide to distinguish the deceased group from the survival group was 235 pg/mL (sensitivity 71·0% and specificity 63·0%) and to distinguish cardioembolic stroke from noncardioembolic stroke was 155 pg/mL (sensitivity 81% and specificity 63%). CONCLUSIONS: Aortic stiffness and brain natriuretic peptide predict mortality in patients with first-ever acute ischemic stroke. Brain natriuretic peptide also differentiates cardioembolic stroke from noncardioembolic stroke.
    International Journal of Stroke 05/2013; · 2.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To analyze electrocardiographic features of patients diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after the Van-Erciş earthquake, with a shock measuring 7.2 on the Richter scale that took place in Turkey in October 2011. Surface electrocardiograms of 12 patients with PTSD admitted to Van Erciş State Hospital (Van, Turkey) from February 2012 to May 2012 were examined. Psychiatric interviews of the sex and age matched control subjects, who had experienced the earthquake, confirmed the absence of any known diagnosable psychiatric conditions in the control group. A wide range of electrocardiogram (ECG) parameters, such as P-wave dispersion, QT dispersion, QT interval, Tpeak to Tend interval, intrinsicoid deflection durations and other traditional parameters were similar in both groups. There was no one with an abnormal P wave axis, short or long PR interval, long or short QT interval, negative T wave in lateral leads, abnormal T wave axis, abnormal left or right intrinsicoid deflection duration, low voltage, left bundle branch block, right bundle branch block, left posterior hemiblock, left or right axis deviation, left ventricular hypertrophy, right or left atrial enlargement and pathological q(Q) wave in either group. The study showed no direct effect of earthquake related PTSD on surface ECG in young patients. So, we propose that PTSD has no direct effect on surface ECG but may cause electrocardiographic changes indirectly by triggering atherosclerosis and/or contributing to the ongoing atherosclerotic process.
    World journal of cardiology. 03/2013; 5(3):60-4.
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Pulmonary embolism (PE) and severe pulmonary stenosis (PS) are two distinct conditions accompanied by increased pressure load of the right ventricle (RV). Despite major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of RV adaptation to the increased pressure, substantial gaps in our knowledge remain unsettled. One of much less known aspect of pressure overload of RV is its impact on electrocardiographic (ECG) changes. In this study, we aimed to study whether acute and chronic RV overload are accompanied by different ECG patterns. METHODS: Thirty-eight patients with PE underwent ECG monitoring were compared with 20 matched patients with PS in this observational retrospective study. ECG abnormalities suggestive of RV overload were recorded and analyzed in both groups. Logistic regression analysis was used to define the predictors of chronic RV overload. RESULTS: Among the ECG changes studied, premature atrial contraction (OR-12.2, 95% CI, 1.3-107, p=0.008), right axis deviation (OR-20.4, 95% CI 4.2-98, p<0.001), indeterminate axis (OR-0.11, 95% CI 0.02-0.44, p=0.001 0.11), incomplete right bundle branch block (OR-4.2, 95% CI, 1.1-15.4, p=0.02), late R in aVR (OR-8.4, 95% CI 2.1-33.2, p=0.001), qR in V1 lead (OR-8.3, 95% CI 1.2-74.8, p=0.03) were found to be the independent predictors of chronic RV pressure overload. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that the ECG changes that attributed to the acute RV pressure loading states may be more prevalent in chronic RV overload as compared with acute RV overload.
    Anadolu kardiyoloji dergisi: AKD = the Anatolian journal of cardiology 03/2013; · 0.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this prospective study was to identify the most effective and safest regimen among different thrombolytic treatment strategies. BACKGROUND: The best treatment strategies for prosthetic valve thrombosis have been controversial. METHODS: Transesophageal echocardiography-guided thrombolytic treatment was administered to 182 consecutive patients with prosthetic valve thrombosis in 220 different episodes (156 women; mean age, 43.2 ± 13.06 years) between 1993 and 2009 at a single center. These regimens chronologically included rapid (Group I), slow (Group II) streptokinase, high-dose (100 mg) tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) (Group III), a half-dose (50 mg) and slow infusion (6 h) of t-PA without bolus (Group IV), and a low dose (25 mg) and slow infusion (6 h) of t-PA without bolus (Group V). The endpoints were thrombolytic success, in-hospital mortality, and nonfatal complication rates. RESULTS: The overall success rate in the whole series was 83.2%; it did not differ significantly among Groups I through V (68.8%, 85.4%, 75%, 81.5%, and 85.5%, respectively; p = 0.46). The overall complication rate in the whole series was 18.6%. Although the overall complication rate was similar among Groups I through IV (37.5%, 24.4 %, 33.3%, and 29.6%, respectively; p > 0.05 for each comparison), it was significantly lower in Group V (10.5%, p < 0.05 for each). The combined rates of mortality and nonfatal major complications were also lower in Group V than in the other groups, with all differences significant except for comparison of Groups IV and V. By multivariate analysis, the predictors of combined mortality plus nonfatal major complications were any thrombolytic therapy regimen other than Group V (odds ratios for Groups I through IV: 8.2, 3.8, 8.1, and 4.1, respectively; p < 0.05 for each) and a history of stroke/transient ischemic attack (odds ratio: 3.5, p = 0.011). In addition, there was no mortality in Group V. CONCLUSIONS: Low-dose slow infusion of t-PA repeated as needed without a bolus provides effective and safe thrombolysis in patients with prosthetic valve thrombosis. (Comparison of Different TRansesophageal Echocardiography Guided thrOmbolytic Regimens for prosthetIc vAlve Thrombosis; NCT01451320).
    JACC. Cardiovascular imaging 02/2013; 6(2):206-216. · 14.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: New, quantitative, reliable and practical echocardiographic parameters are required for grading the severity of mitral regurgitation (MR). Thus, an investigation was made of tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) parameters in MR patients with a preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Transthoracic echocardiography was performed in 96 consecutive patients with varying degrees of MR but with a preserved LVEF. In addition, TDI-derived systolic velocities of the mitral and tricuspid annulus were recorded. The results obtained were compared with those from 31 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. The study patients were classified according to MR severity: mild-moderate (n = 65) or severe (n = 31). Although isovolumic myocardial acceleration (IVA) and peak myocardial velocity during isovolumic contraction (IVV) showed similar values in all groups, the acceleration time (AT) was higher in the severe MR group than in mild or moderate MR patients (p < 0.001). The AT cut-off value to predict severe MR was 35 ms (sensitivity 74.2%, specificity 58.5%). AT has the potential to differentiate severe MR from non-severe MR in patients with a preserved LVEF. These findings suggest that TDI of the mitral annulus might serve as a novel method for assessing MR severity.
    The Journal of heart valve disease 01/2013; 22(1):20-7. · 1.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies have reported a strong independent association between increased red cell distribution width (RDW) and the risk of adverse outcomes in patients with heart failure, stable coronary disease, and acute coronary syndromes. However, in this study we aimed to determine the impact of an elevated RDW level on the postinterventional thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) flow and intrahospital mortality in patients with acute anterior myocardial infarction (AMI). A total of 763 patients with acute AMI undergoing a primary percutaneous coronary intervention were evaluated retrospectively. Upon admission, the RDW level was measured by an automated complete blood count. Postinterventional TIMI flow and intrahospital mortality was documented for all patients from hospital registries. The patients were classified according to the RDW level. RDW more than 14.8% was defined as elevated RDW. All groups were compared statistically according to the preinterventional characteristics. Elevated RDW was found to be an independent predictor of increased intrahospital mortality in multivariate regression analysis (hazard ratio: 3.677, 95% confidence interval: 1.228-11.008, P=0.02). Other independent predictors for intrahospital mortality were diabetes mellitus (hazard ratio: 6.743, 95% confidence interval: 1.941-23.420, P=0.003), smoking (hazard ratio: 6.779, 95% confidence interval: 1.505-30.534, P=0.013), and creatinine more than 0.8 mg/dl (hazard ratio: 7.982, 95% confidence interval: 1.759-36.211, P=0.007). However, there were no independent predictors for TIMI including elevated RDW. A high admission RDW level in patients with acute AMI undergoing a primary percutaneous coronary intervention was associated with an increased risk for intrahospital cardiovascular mortality, but was not associated with worse postinterventional TIMI flow.
    Coronary artery disease 08/2012; 23(7):450-4. · 1.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To survey the dentists in Central Eastern Turkey, testing their knowledge on coronary interventions and assessing perception of antecedent dual antiplatelet therapy. Two hundred and ninety-eight dentists were surveyed face-to-face by completing questionnaires, including 16 structured questions focused on general knowledge of coronary stents, and assessing periprocedural practice with regard to antiplatelet therapy. All respondents were aware of such devices as coronary stents, but only one-third of the respondents knew the differences between a bare metal and a drug-eluting stent design, and associated vascular outcomes. Awareness about stent thrombosis was limited to 34%, while consequences of interrupting antiplatelet therapy were known to only 30% of surveyed dentists. Importantly, the attitudes of surveyed respondents differed substantially depending on the location of their practice, where dentists working in the urban environment (population over 10 000) were more aware of antiplatelet recommendations when compared to their colleagues from the rural areas. Knowledge about coronary stents, associated clinical outcomes, and current guidelines with regard to surgical management of antecedent antiplatelet therapy in Central Eastern Turkey is inconsistent, and heavily dependent on the location of dental practice. Rural areas around the globe should be in a focus of continuous medical education to improve the quality of medical care.
    World journal of cardiology. 07/2012; 4(7):226-30.
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the relationship of coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores with common carotid artery intima media thickness (CCA-IMT), albuminuria and inflammatory factors in type 2 diabetes. 128 asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients, with at least one cardiovascular risk factor in addition to diabetes, were included in the study. CAC scores, carotid arteries plaque formation and CCA-IMT were assessed. The patients were followed for a mean period of 36.6±3.3 months. Linear regression analysis identified the logarithmically transformed (Ln) albuminuria (β=0.32, P=0.007), age (β=0.04, P=0.001) and the uric acid (β=0.13, P=0.04) as independent determinants of the CAC score. During follow-up period, cardiovascular events occurred in 18 out of 46 patients with CAC score ≥100 compared with 5 out of 82 patients with CAC score <100 (log rank, P<0.0001). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis identified LnCAC score (P<0.0001), LnAlbuminuria (P=0.01) and uric acid (P=0.03) as independent predictors for cardiovascular events. There was a significant relationship between CAC score, albuminuria and inflammation in patients with type 2 diabetes. LnCAC score together with LnAlbuminuria and uric acid were identified as independent predictors of cardiovascular events in these patients.
    Diabetes research and clinical practice 05/2012; 98(1):98-103. · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Persistence of left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction after 6 months of diagnosis is believed to be a marker of an irreversible cardiomyopathy in peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). We sought to determine the length of time required for recovery of LV systolic function (LVSF) in patients with PPCM. Forty-two consecutive women with PPCM were enrolled in this prospective study. The minimum required time of follow-up for inclusion was 30 months. Each patient underwent transthoracic echocardiography, and plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-reactive protein measurement at admission, and every 3 months. Early recovery was defined as normalization of LVSF at 6 months post-diagnosis. Delayed recovery was defined if the length of time required for recovery of LVSF was longer than 6 months. Persistent left ventricular dysfunction (PLVD) was defined as an ejection fraction of <50% at the end of follow-up. Twenty patients (47.6%) recovered completely, 10 died (23.8%), and 12 (28.6%) had PLVD. Average time to complete recovery was 19.3 months after initial diagnosis (3-42 months). Early recovery was observed only in six patients (30%), whereas delayed recovery was observed in 14 out of 20 patients (70%). Patients with complete recovery were more likely to have a higher LV ejection fraction and smaller LV end-systolic dimensions at baseline. Full recovery of LVSF in PPCM patients often requires longer than 6 months.
    European Journal of Heart Failure 05/2012; 14(8):895-901. · 5.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is a tendency to avoid noncardiac surgery in patients with mechanical heart valves (MHVs) owing to the increased risk of perioperative thromboembolism, infective endocarditis, and bleeding. We aimed to determine the risk of cardiac and noncardiac complications in patients with MHVs who underwent noncardiothoracic, nonvascular surgery. A total of 140 patients with MHVs (77 aortic, 46 mitral, and 17 double valve) and 1,200 patients with native valves (control group) were prospectively followed up for a minimum of 3 months after noncardiothoracic and nonvascular surgery. Patients with bioprostheses were excluded. Those patients aged >18 years who underwent an elective, non-outpatient, open surgical procedure were enrolled. Subcutaneous enoxaparin 1 mg/kg, twice daily, was used as bridging anticoagulation. The demographics, co-morbidities, and preoperative (medications, echocardiographic findings, laboratory results) and postoperative data were evaluated for their association with the occurrence of perioperative adverse events. The incidence of perioperative adverse cardiovascular (10.8% vs 10.7%, p = 0.985) and noncardiovascular (11.9% vs 11.4%, p = 0.989) events was similar in those patients with and without MHVs. Bleeding (18.6% vs 14.2%, p = 0.989), thromboembolism (3.6% vs 2%, p = 0.989), and mortality at 3 months (1.4% vs 1.3%, p = 0.825) were also similar for the 2 groups. In conclusion, with close follow-up and strict adherence to the guidelines, patients with MHVs and patients with native heart valves undergoing noncardiac and nonvascular surgery have a similar risk of mortality and morbidity.
    The American journal of cardiology 05/2012; 110(4):562-7. · 3.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The study aimed to evaluate the prognostic importance of small pericardial effusion (SPE) found on echocardiography in a cohort of patients hospitalized for acute ischemic stroke. We prospectively followed a series of 408 consecutive first-ever acute ischemic stroke patients aged ≥50 years who were admitted to the hospital within 24 h of the onset of stroke symptoms. All of the patients underwent transthoracic echocardiography within the first 48 h. Exclusion criteria were cardiothoracic surgery or acute myocardial infarction within the previous 6 months, a moderate or greater pericardial effusion (>1 cm if circumferential), and inadequate visualization of the pericardial space. The patients were followed for 1 year or until death, whichever came first. SPE was noted in 64 (15.7 %) of the patients. Mortality at 1 year was greater for patients with a small effusion (n = 21, 32.8 %) compared to those without an effusion (n = 40, 11.6 %, p < 0.001). After adjustment for age, demographics, medical history, and other echocardiographic findings, SPE remained associated with higher mortality (OR 2.515; 95 % CI 1.188-5.477; p = 0.008). This study is the first to demonstrate that the presence of SPE is associated with increased mortality in patients with first-ever acute ischemic stroke.
    Journal of Neurology 04/2012; · 3.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the association of upper airway obstruction (UAO) type and cardiopulmonary complications in children. The effect of obstruction type on quality of life and severity of obstructive symptoms were also investigated. Cross-sectional study. A Brodsky scale and adenoid-nasopharynx ratio (ANR) were used to categorize tonsil and adenoid size, respectively. The patients were divided into four groups according to obstruction type: adenoid hypertrophy only (ANR ≥ 0.63, tonsil grade 1 or 2), adenoid and tonsil hypertrophy (ANR ≥ 0.63, tonsil grade 3 or 4), tonsillar hypertrophy only (ANR < 0.63, tonsil grade 3 or 4), and normal (ANR < 0.63, tonsil grade 1 or 2). Mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP), tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), and right ventricle myocardial performance index (RVMPI) were evaluated for each patient. The obstructive sleep apnea questionnaire (OSA-18) and Brouilette symptom score questionnaire were completed by each child's parents. MPAP was higher in patients with adenoid hypertrophy and adenoid and tonsil hypertrophy in comparison with the normal group. The P values were .079 and .055, respectively, when comparing TAPSE and RVMPI measurents in adenoid and tonsil hypertrophy and normal patients. A significant correlation was found between ANR and MPAP, RVMP, and TAPSE. The patients in the adenoid and tonsil hypertrophy group had the highest Brouilette symptom and OSA-18 scores. Patients with adenoid and tonsil hypertrophy are at a higher risk for cardiopulmonary complications, poorer quality of life, and more severe UAO symptoms and should have priority for surgical treatment to prevent cardiopulmonary complications.
    The Laryngoscope 03/2012; 122(3):676-80. · 1.98 Impact Factor
  • Murat Biteker
    International journal of cardiology 11/2011; 158(3):e60-1. · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The utility of routine preoperative electrocardiography (ECG) for assessing perioperative cardiovascular risk in patients undergoing noncardiac, nonvascular surgery (NCNVS) is unclear. There would be an association between preoperative ECG and perioperative cardiovascular outcomes in patients undergoing NCNVS. A total of 660 patients undergoing NCNVS were prospectively evaluated. Patients age >18 years who underwent an elective, nonday case, open surgical procedure were enrolled. Troponin I concentrations and 12-lead ECG were evaluated the day before surgery, immediately after surgery, and on the first 5 postoperative days. Preoperative ECG showing atrial fibrillation, left or right bundle branch block, left ventricular hypertrophy, frequent premature ventricular complexes, pacemaker rhythm, Q-wave, ST-segment changes, or sinus tachycardia or bradycardia were classified as abnormal. The patients were followed up during hospitalization and were evaluated for the presence of perioperative cardiovascular events (PCE). Eighty patients (12.1%) experienced PCE. Patients with abnormal ECG findings had a greater incidence of PCE than those with normal ECG results (16% vs 6.4%; P < 0.001). Mean QTc interval was significantly longer in the patients who had PCE (436.6 ± 31.4 vs 413.3 ± 16.7 ms; P < 0.001). Univariate analysis showed a significant association between preoperative atrial fibrillation, pacemaker rhythm, ST-segment changes, QTc prolongation, and in-hospital PCE. However, only QTc prolongation (odds ratio: 1.15, 95% confidence interval: 1.06-1.2, P < 0.001) was an independent predictor of PCE according to the multivariate analysis. Every 10-ms increase in QTc interval was related to a 13% increase for PCE. Prolongation of the QTc interval on the preoperative ECG was related with PCE in patients undergoing NCNVS.
    Clinical Cardiology 11/2011; 35(8):494-9. · 1.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aortic stiffness is an early marker of arteriosclerosis and associated with cardiovascular mortality. However, the impact of aortic stiffness on perioperative cardiovascular outcomes in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery is unknown. The study population was composed of 660 consecutive adults aged 18 years and over (mean age = 65.3 ± 14 years) who underwent intermediate-risk (nonvascular), noncardiac surgery between January 2010 and February 2011. Nonemergency, non-day-case, open surgical procedures were enrolled. Aortic stiffness indices were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by echocardiography. Electrocardiography and cardiac biomarkers were evaluated 1 day before surgery, and on days 1, 3, and 7 after surgery. Eighty patients (12.1%) experienced perioperative cardiovascular events (PCE). Preoperative aortic distensibility (AD) (2 ± 1.3 vs. 2.9 ± 1.1 cm2/dyn/10(3), P < 0.001) and aortic strain (AS) (4.4 ± 2.4 vs. 6.4 ± 1.9, P < 0.001) of the patients with PCE were significantly lower than in patients without PCE. Univariate analysis showed a significant association between age, diabetes mellitus (DM), coronary artery disease, preoperative atrial fibrillation, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) status, Revised Cardiac Risk Index, left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF), AD, aortic strain, and in-hospital PCE. However, on multivariate logistic regression analysis, only AD (OR: 1.94, 95% CI: 1.1-3.4; P = 0.02), AS (OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.3-0.6; P < 0.001), DM (OR: 2.28, 95% CI: 1.08-4.82; P = 0.03), and LVEF (OR: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.93-0.99; P = 0.03) remained as significant variables associated with PCE. Impaired elastic properties of the aorta are associated with increased PCE rates in patients undergoing noncardiac, nonvascular surgery.
    World Journal of Surgery 09/2011; 35(11):2411-6. · 2.23 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

191 Citations
162.35 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013–2014
    • Istanbul Medipol University
      İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
    • Istanbul Training and Research Hospital
      İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
  • 2010–2013
    • Haydarpasa Numune Research and Teaching Hospital
      İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
  • 2008–2010
    • Koşuyolu Kalp ve Araştırma Hastanesi
      İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey