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Publications (5)15.92 Total impact

  • Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A-molecular & Integrative Physiology - COMP BIOCHEM PHYSIOL PT A. 01/2008; 150(3).
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to isolate clones of genes which are likely to be involved in wax deposition on barley leaves. Of particular interest were those genes which encode proteins that take part in the synthesis and further modification of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), the precursors of waxes. Previously, it had been shown that wax deposition commences within a spatially well-defined developmental zone along the growing barley leaf (Richardson et al. in Planta 222:472-483, 2005). In the present study, a barley microarray approach was used to screen for candidate contig-sequences (www.barleybase.org) that are expressed particularly in those leaf zones where wax deposition occurs and which are expressed specifically within the epidermis, the site of wax synthesis. Candidate contigs were used to screen an established in-house cDNA library of barley. Six full-length coding sequences clones were isolated. Based on sequence homologies, three clones were related to Arabidopsis CER6/CUT1, and these clones were termed HvCUT1;1, HvCUT1;2 and HvCUT1;3. A fourth clone, which was related to Arabidopsis Fiddlehead (FDH), was termed HvFDH1;1. These clones are likely to be involved in synthesis of VLCFAs. A fifth and sixth clone were related to Arabidopsis CER1, and were termed HvCER1;1 and HvCER1;2. These clones are likely to be involved in the decarbonylation pathway of VLCFAs. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed microarray expression data. In addition, expression analyses at 10-mm resolution along the blade suggest that HvCUT1;1 (and possibly HvCUT1;2) and HvCER1;1 are involved in commencement of wax deposition during barley leaf epidermal cell development.
    Planta 12/2007; 226(6):1459-73. · 3.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The developing leaf three of barley provides an excellent model system for the direct determination of relationships between amounts of waxes and cutin and cuticular permeance. Permeance of the cuticle was assessed via the time-course of uptake of either toluidine blue or (14)C-labelled benzoic acid ([(14)C] BA) along the length of the developing leaf. Toluidine blue uptake only occurred within the region 0-25 mm from the point of leaf insertion (POLI). Resistance--the inverse of permeance--to uptake of [(14)C] BA was determined for four leaf regions and was lowest in the region 10-20 mm above POLI. At 20-30 and 50-60 mm above POLI, it increased by factors of 6 and a further 32, respectively. Above the point of emergence of leaf three from the sheath of leaf two, which was 76-80 mm above POLI, resistance was as high as at 50-60 mm above POLI. GC-FID/MS analyses of wax and cutin showed that: (1) the initial seven fold increase in cuticular resistance coincided with increase in cutin coverage and appearance of waxes; (2) the second, larger and final increase in cuticle resistance was accompanied by an increase in wax coverage, whereas cutin coverage remained unchanged; (3) cutin deposition in barley leaf epidermis occurred in parallel with cell elongation, whereas deposition of significant amounts of wax commenced as cells ceased to elongate.
    Planta 06/2007; 225(6):1471-81. · 3.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent results concerning the short-term growth response to salinity of the developing barley leaf are reviewed. Plants were grown hydroponically and the growth response of leaf 3 was studied between 10 min and 5 d following addition of 100 mM NaCl to the root medium. The aim of the experiments was to relate changes in variables that are likely to affect cell elongation to changes in leaf growth. Changes in hormone content (ABA, cytokinins), water and solute relationships (osmolality, turgor, water potential, solute concentrations), gene expression (water channel), cuticle deposition, membrane potential, and transpiration were followed, while leaf elongation velocity was monitored. Leaf elongation decreased close to zero within seconds following addition of NaCl. Between 20 and 30 min after exposure to salt, elongation velocity recovered rather abruptly, to about 46% of the pre-stress level, and remained at the reduced rate for the following 5 d, when it reached about 70% of the level in non-stressed plants. Biophysical and physiological analyses led to three major conclusions. (i) The immediate reduction and sudden recovery in elongation velocity is due to changes in the water potential gradient between leaf xylem and peripheral elongating cells. Changes in transpiration, ABA and cytokinin content, water channel expression, and plasma membrane potential are involved in this response. (ii) Significant solute accumulation, which aids growth recovery, is detectable from 1 h onwards; growing and non-growing leaf regions and mesophyll and epidermis differ in their solute response. (iii) Cuticular wax density is not affected by short-term exposure to salt; transpirational changes are due to stomatal control.
    Journal of Experimental Botany 02/2006; 57(5):1079-95. · 5.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In grasses, leaf cells divide and expand within the sheaths of older leaves, where the micro-environment differs from the open atmosphere. By the time epidermal cells are displaced into the atmosphere, they must have a functional cuticle to minimize uncontrolled water loss. In the present study, gas chromatography and scanning electron microscopy were used to follow cuticular wax deposition along the growing leaf three of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). 1-Hexacosanol (C(26) alcohol) comprised more than 75% of extractable cuticular wax and was used as a marker for wax deposition. There was no detectable wax along the first 20 mm from the point of leaf insertion. Deposition started within the distal portion of the elongation zone (23-45 mm) and continued beyond the point of leaf emergence from the sheath of leaf two. The region where wax deposition commenced shifted towards more proximal (basal) positions when the point of leaf emergence was lowered by stripping back part of the sheath. When relative humidity in the shoot environment was elevated from 70% (standard growth conditions) to 92-96% for up to 4 days prior to analysis, wax deposition did not change significantly. The results show that cuticular waxes are deposited along the growing grass leaf independent of cell age or developmental stage. Instead, the reference point for wax deposition appears to be the point of emergence of cells into the atmosphere. The possibility of changes in relative humidity between enclosed and emerged leaf regions triggering wax deposition is discussed.
    Planta 11/2005; 222(3):472-83. · 3.38 Impact Factor