K A Jaeger

Universitätsspital Basel, Bâle, Basel-City, Switzerland

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Publications (144)521.51 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background Although the possibility of bleeding during anticoagulant treatment may limit patients from taking part in physical activity, the association between physical activity and anticoagulation-related bleeding is uncertain.Objectives To determine whether physical activity is associated with bleeding in elderly patients taking anticoagulants.Patients/Methods In a prospective multicenter cohort study of 988 patients aged ≥65 years receiving anticoagulants for venous thromboembolism, we assessed patients’ self-reported physical activity level. The primary outcome was the time to a first major bleeding, defined as fatal bleeding, symptomatic bleeding in a critical site, or bleeding causing a fall in hemoglobin or leading to transfusions. The secondary outcome was the time to a first clinically-relevant non-major bleeding. We examined the association between physical activity level and time to a first bleeding using competing risk regression, accounting for death as a competing event. We adjusted for known bleeding risk factors and anticoagulation as a time-varying covariate.ResultsDuring a mean follow-up of 22 months, patients with a low, moderate, and high physical activity level had an incidence of major bleeding of 11.6, 6.3, and 3.1 events per 100 patient-years, and an incidence of clinically relevant non-major bleeding of 14.0, 10.3, and 7.7 events per 100 patient-years, respectively. A high physical activity level was significantly associated with a lower risk of major bleeding (adjusted sub-hazard ratio 0.40, 95%-CI 0.22-0.72). There was no association between physical activity and non-major bleeding.ConclusionsA high level of physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of major bleeding in elderly patients receiving anticoagulant therapy.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 11/2014; · 6.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Polypharmacy, defined as the concomitant use of multiple medications, is very common in the elderly and may trigger drug-drug interactions and increase the risk of falls in patients receiving vitamin K antagonists.
    Journal of General Internal Medicine 08/2014; · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We aimed to assess whether elderly patients with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) receive recommended initial processes of care and to identify predictors of process adherence.
    PLoS ONE 07/2014; 9(7):e100164. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective Whether or not a high risk of falls increases the risk of bleeding in patients receiving anticoagulants remains a matter of debate.Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study involving 991 patients ≥65 years of age who received anticoagulants for acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) at 9 Swiss hospitals between September 2009 and September 2012. The study outcomes were as follows: the time to a first major episode of bleeding; and clinically-relevant non-major bleeding. We determined the associations between the risk of falls and the time to a first episode of bleeding using competing risk regression, accounting for death as a competing event. We adjusted for known bleeding risk factors and anticoagulation as a time-varying covariate.ResultsFour hundred fifty-eight of 991 patients (46%) were at high risk of falls. The mean duration of follow-up was 16.7 months. Patients at high risk of falls had a higher incidence of major bleeding (9.6 vs. 6.6 events/100 patient-years; P=0.05) and a significantly higher incidence of clinically relevant non-major bleeding (16.7 vs. 8.3 events/100 patient-years; P<0.001) than patients at low risk of falls. After adjustment, a high risk of falls was associated with clinically relevant non-major bleeding (sub-hazard ratio [SHR] = 1.74, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23-2.46), but not with major bleeding (SHR = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.83-1.86).Conclusion In elderly patients who receive anticoagulants because of VTE, a high risk of falls is significantly associated with clinically-relevant non-major bleeding, but not with major bleeding. Whether or not a high risk of falls is a reason against providing anticoagulation beyond 3 months should be based on patient preferences and the risk of VTE recurrence.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Internal Medicine 03/2014; · 6.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the origin of skeletal muscle BOLD MRI alterations in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) by correlating BOLD MRI T2* signal of calf muscles with microcirculatory blood flow of calf skin measured by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). BOLD MRI (3T) and LDF measurements were performed in 12 consecutive SSc patients (6 women, 6 men; mean age 54.0 ± 10.0 years) and 12 healthy volunteers (4 men, 8 women; mean age 44.7 ± 13.1 years). For both modalities, the same cuff compression paradigm at mid-thigh level was used. LDF datasets were acquired using a PeriScan PIM II Imager (Perimed AB, Stockholm, Sweden) at the upper calf corresponding to the level of MR imaging. Cross-correlations of BOLD and LDF signal intensity changes depending on time lags between both time series were calculated. Maximal cross-correlations of BOLD T2* and LDF measurements were calculated as 0.93 (healthy volunteers) and 0.94 (SSc patients) for a BOLD time lag of approximately 10 s. Key parameter analysis suggested that in contrast to hyperemic BOLD signal loss at maximum value in SSc patients, ischemic T2* decrease cannot be explained by differences of tissue perfusion. Skeletal muscle BOLD T2* signal in SSc patients is closely correlated with changes of microperfusion as detected by LDF.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging 11/2013; · 2.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is a need to validate risk assessment tools for hospitalised medical patients at risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). We investigated whether a predefined cut-off of the Geneva Risk Score, as compared to the Padua Prediction Score, accurately distinguishes low-risk from high-risk patients regardless of the use of thromboprophylaxis. In the multicentre, prospective Explicit ASsessment of Thromboembolic RIsk and Prophylaxis for Medical PATients in SwitzErland (ESTIMATE) cohort study, 1,478 hospitalised medical patients were enrolled of whom 637 (43%) did not receive thromboprophylaxis. The primary endpoint was symptomatic VTE or VTE-related death at 90 days. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01277536. According to the Geneva Risk Score, the cumulative rate of the primary endpoint was 3.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.2-4.6%) in 962 high-risk vs 0.6% (95% CI 0.2-1.9%) in 516 low-risk patients (p=0.002); among patients without prophylaxis, it was 3.5% vs 0.8% (p=0.029), respectively. In comparison, the Padua Prediction Score yielded a cumulative rate of the primary endpoint of 3.5% (95% CI 2.3-5.3%) in 714 high-risk vs 1.1% (95% CI 0.6-2.3%) in 764 low-risk patients (p=0.002); among patients without prophylaxis, it was 3.2% vs 1.5% (p=0.130), respectively. Negative likelihood ratio was 0.28 (95% CI 0.10-0.83) for the Geneva Risk Score and 0.51 (95% CI 0.28-0.93) for the Padua Prediction Score. In conclusion, among hospitalised medical patients, the Geneva Risk Score predicted VTE and VTE-related mortality and compared favourably with the Padua Prediction Score, particularly for its accuracy to identify low-risk patients who do not require thromboprophylaxis.
    Thrombosis and Haemostasis 11/2013; 111(3). · 5.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To prospectively compare calf muscle BOLD MRI with transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO(2) ) measurement in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and healthy volunteers and thereby get insight into the pathogenesis of vasculopathy in this connective tissue disorder. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve patients with SSc (6 women and 6 men, mean age 53.5 ± 10.0 years) and 12 healthy volunteers (4 men and 8 women, mean age 47 ± 12.1 years) were examined using muscle BOLD MRI and TcPO(2) . A cuff compression at mid-thigh level was performed to provoke ischemia and reactive hyperemia. BOLD measurements were acquired on a 3 Tesla whole body-scanner in the upper calf region using a multi-echo EPI-sequence with four echo-times (TE: 9/20/31/42 ms) and a repetition time of 2 s. Empirical cross-correlation analysis depending on time lags between BOLD- and TcPO(2) -measurements was performed. RESULTS: Maximal cross-correlation of BOLD T2*- and TcPO(2) -measurements was calculated as 0.93 (healthy volunteers) and 0.90 (SSc patients) for a time lag of approximately 40 s. Both modalities showed substantial differences regarding time course parameters between the SSc patients and healthy volunteers. CONCLUSION: Skeletal muscle BOLD MRI correlated very well with TcPO(2) . T2* changes seem to reflect reoxygenation deficits in deeper muscle tissue of SSc patients. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2013;. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging 02/2013; · 2.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We assessed the cutaneous microcirculatory reactivity of a clinically unaffected skin region in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) compared to healthy controls by measuring transcutaneous oxygen saturation (TcPO2) and Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Twelve consecutive patients with SSc and twelve healthy controls were subjected to TcPO2 monitoring and LDF during cuff-induced ischemia and reactive hyperemia in order to measure the skin oxygen tension and the microcirculatory blood flow. Mean minimal and maximal values of oxygen tension and blood flow, time to peak (TTP), and declining slopes after peaking (slope) were compared between patients with SSc and controls. Compared to the controls, TcPO2 values in SSc were similar during ischemia and diminished during reactive hyperemia, with shorter TTP, and a slower return to baseline (-60% vs. -58%, p = 1.000, +76% vs. +210%, p = 0.047, 137 s vs. 108 s, p = 0.028, -0.009%/s vs. -0.019%/s, p = 0.021, respectively). LDF values, however, did not differ significantly between patients with SSc and controls. Unaffected skin regions of SSc patients showed a significantly diminished postischemic vasodilatory reactivity when assessed by TcPO2 monitoring, but not by LDF, indicating that vasculopathy may represent an early mechanism in the onset of skin sclerosis. TcPO2 measurement may help to detect changes in the microcirculation in SSc with no skin affection.
    Clinical hemorheology and microcirculation 01/2013; · 3.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is common and has a high impact on morbidity, mortality, and costs of care. Although most of the patients with VTE are aged ≥65 years, there is little data about the medical outcomes in the elderly with VTE. The Swiss Cohort of Elderly Patients with VTE (SWITCO65+) is a prospective multicenter cohort study of in- and outpatients aged ≥65 years with acute VTE from all five Swiss university and four high-volume non-university hospitals. The goal is to examine which clinical and biological factors and processes of care drive short- and long-term medical outcomes, health-related quality of life, and medical resource utilization in elderly patients with acute VTE. The cohort also includes a large biobank with biological material from each participant. From September 2009 to March 2012, 1,863 elderly patients with VTE were screened and 1003 (53.8 %) were enrolled in the cohort. Overall, 51.7 % of patients were aged ≥75 years and 52.7 % were men. By October 16, 2012, after an average follow-up time of 512 days, 799 (79.7 %) patients were still actively participating. SWITCO65+ is a unique opportunity to study short- and long-term outcomes in elderly patients with VTE. The Steering Committee encourages national and international collaborative research projects related to SWITCO65+, including sharing anonymized data and biological samples.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 01/2013; · 1.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) for vascular imaging indications has increased dramatically during the last decade. Ultrasound contrast agents are gas-filled microbubbles that are injected into the bloodstream and serve as strict intravascular reflectors of ultrasound waves. Numerous studies have addressed the potential clinical use of CEUS in different vascular fields including the carotid arteries, the abdominal aorta, renal arteries and the kidneys. In this review article we discuss the clinical value of contrast agents in vascular ultrasound by enhancing the vascular lumen, and more important, their role as a tool to deliver high resolution, real-time images of microvascular perfusion. Specifically, CEUS imaging of the carotid artery provides a novel, non-invasive method not only to improve the delineation of the vessel wall, but also for the assessment of the vasa vasorum and the ectopic vascularization of the atherosclerotic plaque (intraplaque neovascularization); probably providing a “window” to risk stratify atherosclerotic lesions and individuals by identifying “vulnerable” plaques prone to rupture causing vascular events. CEUS imaging has also emerged as a novel diagnostic tool in various aortic pathologies and particularly for the detection of endoleaks following endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. It is also a valuable tool for the assessment of the tissue perfusion in native and transplanted kidneys providing information on perfusion deficits of the parenchyma. Furthermore, a real-time CEUS method has recently been developed to assess the skeletal muscle microcirculation which could be used to study patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease or diabetic microangiopathy. In the future, the use of targeted microbubbles could further enhance and expand the diagnostic capabilities of current vascular ultrasound imaging by detecting specific molecular processes that play a role in the pathophysiology of vascular disease.
    VASA.: Zeitschrift für Gefässkrankheiten. Journal for vascular diseases 01/2013; 42(1):17-31. · 1.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The Outpatient Bleeding Risk Index (OBRI) and the Kuijer, RIETE, and Kearon scores are clinical prognostic scores for bleeding in patients receiving oral anticoagulants for venous thromboembolism (VTE). We prospectively compared the performance of these scores in elderly patients with VTE. METHODS: In a prospective multicenter Swiss cohort study, we studied 663 patients aged ≥65 years with acute VTE. The outcome was a first major bleeding at 90 days. We classified patients into three categories of bleeding risk (low, intermediate, and high) according to each score and dichotomized patients as high vs. low or intermediate risk. We calculated the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, positive predictive values and likelihood ratios for each score. RESULTS: Overall, 28 out of 663 patients (4.2%, 95% confidence interval 2.8-6.0%) had a first major bleeding within 90 days. According to different scores, the rate of major bleeding varied from 1.9% to 2.1% in low-risk, from 4.2% to 5.0% in intermediate-risk, and from 3.1% to 6.6% in high-risk patients. The discriminative power of the scores was poor to moderate, with areas under the ROC curve ranging from 0.49 to 0.60 (P=0.21). The positive predictive values and positive likelihood ratios were low and varied from 3.1% to 6.6% and from 0.72 to 1.59, respectively. CONCLUSION: In elderly patients with VTE, existing bleeding risk scores do not have sufficient accuracy and power to discriminate between patients with VTE who are at high-risk of short-term major bleeding and those who are not. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 12/2012; · 6.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Muscle symptoms in systemic sclerosis (SSc) may originate from altered skeletal muscle microcirculation, which can be investigated by means of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: After ethics committee approval and written consent, 11 consecutive SSc patients (5 men, mean age 52.6 years, mean SSc disease duration 5.4 years) and 12 healthy volunteers (4 men, mean age 45.1 years) were included. Subjects with peripheral arterial occlusive disease were excluded. BOLD MRI was performed on calf muscles during cuff-induced ischemia and reactive hyperemia, using a 3-T whole-body scanner (Verio, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) and fat-suppressed single-short multi-echo echo planar imaging (EPI) with four different effective echo times. Muscle BOLD signal time courses were obtained for gastrocnemius and soleus muscles: minimal hemoglobin oxygen saturation (T2*min) and maximal T2* values (T2*max), time to T2* peak (TTP), and slopes of oxygen normalization after T2* peaking. RESULTS: The vast majority of SSc patients lacked skeletal muscle atrophy, weakness or serum creatine kinase elevation. Nevertheless, more intense oxygen desaturation during ischemia was observed in calf muscles of SSc patients (mean T2*min 15.0 %), compared with controls (-9.1%, P=0.02). SSc patients also had impaired oxygenation during hyperemia (median T2*max 9.2% vs. 20.1%, respectively, P=0.007). The slope of muscle oxygen normalization was significantly less steep and prolonged (TTP) in SSc patients (P<0.001 for both). Similar differences were found at a separate analysis of gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, with most pronounced impairment in the gastrocnemius. CONCLUSIONS: BOLD MRI demonstrates a significant impairment of skeletal muscle microcirculation in SSc.
    Arthritis research & therapy 10/2012; 14(5):R209. · 4.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The Geneva Prognostic Score (GPS), the Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI), and its simplified version (sPESI) are well known clinical prognostic scores for pulmonary embolism (PE).Objectives: To compare the prognostic performance of these scores in elderly patients with PE. Patients/Methods: In a multicenter Swiss cohort of elderly patients with venous thromboembolism, we prospectively studied 449 patients aged ≥65 years with symptomatic PE. The outcome was 30-day overall mortality. We dichotomized patients as low- vs. higher-risk in all three scores using the following thresholds: GPS scores ≤2 vs. >2, PESI risk classes I-II vs. III-V, and sPESI scores 0 vs. ≥1. We compared 30-day mortality in low- vs. higher-risk patients and the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC). Results: Overall, 3.8% of patients (17/449) died within 30 days. The GPS classified a greater proportion of patients as low risk (92% [413/449]) than the PESI (36.3% [163/449]) and the sPESI (39.6% [178/449]) (P<0.001 for each comparison). Low-risk patients based on the sPESI had a mortality of 0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0-2.1%) compared to 0.6% (95% CI 0-3.4%) for low-risk patients based on the PESI and 3.4% (95% CI 1.9-5.6%) for low-risk patients based on the GPS. The areas under the ROC curves were 0.77 (95%CI 0.72-0.81), 0.76 (95% CI 0.72-0.80), and 0.71 (95% CI 0.66-0.75), respectively (P=0.47). Conclusions: In this cohort of elderly patients with PE, the GPS identified a higher proportion of patients as low-risk but the PESI and sPESI were more accurate in predicting mortality. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 09/2012; · 6.08 Impact Factor
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    Ultraschall in der Medizin 08/2012; · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: In patients with suspected giant cell arteritis (GCA), a search for the perivascular halo sign, a sophisticated color duplex ultrasound (CDU) finding, at experienced centers reliably identifies inflamed temporal arteries (TA). We tested whether TA compression in patients with GCA, a simple, largely operator-independent maneuver, elicits contrasting echogenicity between the diseased artery wall and the surrounding tissue (compression sign). Materials and Methods: 80 individuals with suspected GCA were prospectively enrolled in this single-center study. In all study participants, bilateral ultrasound examination of the TA established the presence/absence of the halo and compression sign. A positive compression sign was defined as visibility of the TA upon transducer-imposed compression of the artery. Based on ACR criteria, a team of specialized physicians independently grouped patients as GCA versus non-GCA. Results: 43/80 study participants were grouped as GCA. Both the halo sign and the compression sign were positive in 34/43 patients in the GCA group, and negative in all 37/37 of the non-GCA group, resulting in a sensitivity of 79 % and a specificity of 100 % for both the halo and the compression sign. Conclusion: In this cohort of individuals with suspected GCA, the halo sign and the compression sign were equal in their diagnostic performance. The simplicity of the compression sign suggests a level of reliability warranting further evaluation.
    Ultraschall in der Medizin 06/2012; · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the accuracy of noninvasive central venous pressure (CVP) assessment by compression ultrasound of a forearm vein (CUS), inferior vena cava (IVC-C) and internal jugular vein collapsibility (IJV-C) compared to invasive CVP measurement (invCVP) as the gold standard. Materials and Methods: CUS, IVC-C and IJV-C were performed in a random sequence in 81 consecutive intensive care patients with simultaneous invCVP monitoring. Examiners were blinded to invCVP and previous examinations. Results: Median invCVP was 12.0 mmHg (range 1 - 23). CUS, IVC-C and IJV-C could be obtained in 89 %, 95 % and 100 % of cases, respectively, within a median time of 188 sec [IQR 125; 270], 133 sec [IQR 100; 211] and 60 sec [IQR 50; 109], respectively. The Spearman correlation coefficient between invCVP and CUS, IVC-C, and IJV-C was 0.485 95 %-CI [0.25; 0.65], -0.186 [-0.42; 0.07], and -0.408 [-0.59; -0.18], respectively. The median absolute difference between CUS and invCVP was 3 mmHg [IQR 2; 6.75]. CVP was categorized as low (< 7 mmHg; collapsibility > 0.6), normal (7 - 12 mmHg; collapsibility 0.6 - 0.2) and high (> 12 mmHg; collapsibility < 0.2) as prespecified. The proportions of identical CVP classifications compared to invCVP were 61.4% 95%-CI [49.3%; 72.4%] with CUS, 48.7% [37.4%; 60%] with IVC-C and 51.3% [40.3%; 62.3%] with IJV-C (p > 0.10 for all pair-wise comparisons). Conclusion: The overall ability of CUS, IVC-C and IJV-C to assess invCVP was only moderate. CUS seems to be the preferable method if absolute CVP values are needed. IJV-C seems to be the fastest and most easily acquirable method, and thus may be especially valuable in emergency rooms.
    Ultraschall in der Medizin 06/2012; · 4.12 Impact Factor
  • Pavel Broz, Kurt A Jaeger
    Vascular Medicine 05/2012; 17(5):366-7. · 1.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Thrombin potently activates platelets through the protease-activated receptor PAR-1. Vorapaxar is a novel antiplatelet agent that selectively inhibits the cellular actions of thrombin through antagonism of PAR-1. We randomly assigned 26,449 patients who had a history of myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, or peripheral arterial disease to receive vorapaxar (2.5 mg daily) or matching placebo and followed them for a median of 30 months. The primary efficacy end point was the composite of death from cardiovascular causes, myocardial infarction, or stroke. After 2 years, the data and safety monitoring board recommended discontinuation of the study treatment in patients with a history of stroke owing to the risk of intracranial hemorrhage. At 3 years, the primary end point had occurred in 1028 patients (9.3%) in the vorapaxar group and in 1176 patients (10.5%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio for the vorapaxar group, 0.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80 to 0.94; P<0.001). Cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, or recurrent ischemia leading to revascularization occurred in 1259 patients (11.2%) in the vorapaxar group and 1417 patients (12.4%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.95; P=0.001). Moderate or severe bleeding occurred in 4.2% of patients who received vorapaxar and 2.5% of those who received placebo (hazard ratio, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.43 to 1.93; P<0.001). There was an increase in the rate of intracranial hemorrhage in the vorapaxar group (1.0%, vs. 0.5% in the placebo group; P<0.001). Inhibition of PAR-1 with vorapaxar reduced the risk of cardiovascular death or ischemic events in patients with stable atherosclerosis who were receiving standard therapy. However, it increased the risk of moderate or severe bleeding, including intracranial hemorrhage. (Funded by Merck; TRA 2P-TIMI 50 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00526474.).
    New England Journal of Medicine 03/2012; 366(15):1404-13. · 54.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study sought to determine possible effects of different antiplatelet therapies on walking exercise performance in intermittent claudication. Aspirin, in contrast to clopidogrel, interferes with processes that increase collateral conductance in an ischemic animal model. Patients with stable intermittent claudication were recruited from 21 centers in Switzerland and Germany and randomized to either aspirin or clopidogrel treatment. They participated in a 3-month rehabilitation program (electronically monitored, home-based, 1-hour daily walking sessions at a speed of approximately 120 steps/min). Walking distance was assessed by treadmill tests (3.2 km/h; 12% grade) at baseline and after 12 weeks. A total of 229 of 259 patients with a mean age of 66.2±7.7 years completed the study according to the protocol. A total of 24.5% were females, 20.1% diabetics, and 85.6% were active/ex-smokers. The baseline characteristics were a median (interquartile range) ankle/brachial index of 0.69 (0.57±0.8), an initial claudication distance (ICD) of 98 m (70 to 151 m), and an absolute claudication distance (ACD) of 162 m (113 to 302 m). Training resulted in a median increase of initial claudication distance by 33.5 m (33.3%) in the clopidogrel group and 29 m (33.9%) in the aspirin group. The values for absolute claudication distance were 60.5 m (34.9%) and 75 m (35.3%), respectively (p(ICD)=0.42 and p(ACD)=0.66). Treatment with aspirin did not show a difference in initial claudication distance or absolute claudication distance improvements compared with clopidogrel after a 3-month walking rehabilitation program. (J Am Heart Assoc. 2012;1:51-56.) URL: http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00189618, URL: https://EudraCT.ema.europa.eu, Unique identifier: 2004-005041-35.
    Journal of the American Heart Association. 02/2012; 1(1):51-6.

Publication Stats

1k Citations
521.51 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1994–2014
    • Universitätsspital Basel
      • • Departement für Medizinische Radiologie
      • • Klinik für Angiologie
      Bâle, Basel-City, Switzerland
  • 2013
    • Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
      Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • 2012–2013
    • Inselspital, Universitätsspital Bern
      • Department of General Internal Medicine
      Bern, BE, Switzerland
  • 2001–2012
    • Universität Basel
      • Abteilung Angewandte & Umweltgeologie (AUG)
      Bâle, Basel-City, Switzerland
  • 2010
    • University of Birmingham
      Birmingham, England, United Kingdom