C E Cox

University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, United States

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Publications (158)488.52 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Metastatic breast cancer to the contralateral axilla (CAM) is defined as stage IV disease. We postulate that CAM represents an extension of local-regional disease rather than distant metastasis and may have a better outcome. A single-institution, retrospective review of breast cancer cases from January 2005 and May 2011 was performed to identify cases with CAM. Eligibility for the study included unilateral primary breast cancer at presentation with synchronous/metachronous documented CAM without a documented primary invasive breast cancer within the contralateral breast by surgery or MRI. Clinicopathologic data was recorded for these patients (pts). Thirteen pts were identified. 12/13 (92%) pts presented with a locally advanced breast tumor or an ipsilateral in-breast recurrence. 10/13 (77%) pts had documented dermal involvement of tumor either at initial presentation or local recurrence. CAM occurred synchronously with the initial primary tumor (5 pts, 38%), concomitant with a local recurrence (5 pts, 38%), metachronously with the initial tumor (1 pt, 8%), and metachronously with a local recurrence (2 pts, 15%). Three patients had other distant disease at presentation. Of the other 10 pts, seven developed distant disease with a mean follow up of 3.6 years (range 0.3-7.6 years). Three pts have no evidence of disease at a mean follow up of 5.8 years (range 1.5-8.2). CAM may have different prognostic implications than other distant metastases and may occur through dermal lymphatic spread. Further study is warranted on the prognosis and management of these challenging and rare cases.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 04/2014; · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Researchers focused on patient-centered medicine are increasingly trying to identify baseline factors that predict treatment success. Because the quantity and function of lymphocyte subsets change during stress, we hypothesized that these subsets would serve as stress markers and therefore predict which breast cancer patients would benefit most from mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR)-facilitated stress relief. The purpose of this study was to assess whether baseline biomarker levels predicted symptom improvement following an MBSR intervention for breast cancer survivors (MBSR[BC]). This randomized controlled trial involved 41 patients assigned to either an MBSR(BC) intervention group or a no-treatment control group. Biomarkers were assessed at baseline, and symptom change was assessed 6 weeks later. Biomarkers included common lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood as well as the ability of T cells to become activated and secrete cytokines in response to stimulation with mitogens. Spearman correlations were used to identify univariate relationships between baseline biomarkers and 6-week improvement of symptoms. Next, backward elimination regression models were used to identify the strongest predictors from the univariate analyses. Multiple baseline biomarkers were significantly positively related to 6-week symptom improvement. The regression models identified B-lymphocytes and interferon-γ as the strongest predictors of gastrointestinal improvement (p < .01), +CD4+CD8 as the strongest predictor of cognitive/psychological (CP) improvement (p = .02), and lymphocytes and interleukin (IL)-4 as the strongest predictors of fatigue improvement (p < .01). These results provide preliminary evidence of the potential to use baseline biomarkers as predictors to identify the patients likely to benefit from this intervention.
    Biological Research for Nursing 01/2014; · 1.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Metastatic breast cancer to the contralateral axilla (CAM) is defined as stage IV disease. We postulate that CAM represents an extension of local-regional disease rather than distant metastasis and may have a better outcome. A single-institution, retrospective review of breast cancer cases from January 2005 and May 2011 was performed to identify cases with CAM. Eligibility for the study included unilateral primary breast cancer at presentation with synchronous/metachronous documented CAM without a documented primary invasive breast cancer within the contralateral breast by surgery or MRI. Clinicopathologic data was recorded for these patients (pts). Thirteen pts were identified. 12/13 (92%) pts presented with a locally advanced breast tumor or an ipsilateral in-breast recurrence. 10/13 (77%) pts had documented dermal involvement of tumor either at initial presentation or local recurrence. CAM occurred synchronously with the initial primary tumor (5 pts, 38%), concomitant with a local recurrence (5 pts, 38%), metachronously with the initial tumor (1 pt, 8%), and metachronously with a local recurrence (2 pts, 15%). Three patients had other distant disease at presentation. Of the other 10 pts, seven developed distant disease with a mean follow up of 3.6 years (range 0.3–7.6 years). Three pts have no evidence of disease at a mean follow up of 5.8 years (range 1.5–8.2). CAM may have different prognostic implications than other distant metastases and may occur through dermal lymphatic spread. Further study is warranted on the prognosis and management of these challenging and rare cases.
    The Breast. 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: MammaPrint, a prognostic 70-gene profile for early-stage breast cancer, has been available for fresh tissue. Improvements in RNA processing have enabled microarray diagnostics for formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. Here, we describe method optimization, validation, and performance of MammaPrint using analyte from FFPE tissue. Laboratory procedures for enabling the assay to be run on FFPE tissue were determined using 157 samples, and the assay was established using 125 matched FFPE and fresh tissues. Validation of MammaPrint-FFPE, compared with MammaPrint-fresh, was performed on an independent series of matched tissue from five hospitals (n = 211). Reproducibility, repeatability, and precision of the FFPE assay (n = 87) was established for duplicate analysis of the same tumor, interlaboratory performance, 20-day repeat experiments, and repeated analyses over 12 months. FFPE sample processing had a success rate of 97%. The MammaPrint assay using FFPE analyte demonstrated an overall equivalence of 91.5% (95% confidence interval, 86.9% to 94.5%) between the 211 independent matched FFPE and fresh tumor samples. Precision was 97.3%, and repeatability was 97.8%, with highly reproducible results between replicate samples of the same tumor and between two laboratories (concordance, 96%). Thus, with 580 tumor samples, MammaPrint was successfully translated to FFPE tissue. The assay has high precision and reproducibility, and FFPE results are substantially equivalent to results derived from fresh tissue.
    The Journal of molecular diagnostics: JMD 12/2013; · 3.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: As the wave of the baby boomers shifts the age demographic of patients, the current surgical management of breast cancer in elderly women (≥70 years of age) becomes relevant because deviation from standard treatment often occurs in this group. The purpose of this study was to determine the operative mortality when treated with standard surgical procedures and to investigate trends in the surgical management of breast cancer in the elderly. A total of 5,235 patients undergoing either mastectomy or breast conservation surgery (BCS) for invasive and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) were identified in a retrospective review of a prospectively accrued data base between the years of 1994 and 2007 at the Moffitt Cancer Center. Of the 5,235 patients, 1,028 (20%) patients were ≥70 years of age. The 30-day and 90-day mortality in the elderly group (age ≥70 years) was 0.2% (95% CI 0.02-0.7%) and 0.7% (95% CI 0.3-1.4%), respectively. The 30-day and 90-day mortality among patients <70 years was 0 and 0.05% (2 of 4,207 patients) (95% CI 0.005-0.2), respectively. BCS rates for invasive carcinomas were the highest for patients between 40 and 70 years of age, whereas the mastectomy rates were higher among patients <40 years of age (53%). Elderly women were as likely as women <40 years to have BCS for invasive carcinoma (OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.8-1.5), but more likely to have BCS for DCIS (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.3). Surgical mortality in elderly women treated for breast cancer was extremely low and was related to the extent of surgery performed. Breast cancer treatment differed by age groups.
    The Breast Journal 09/2012; 18(5):428-35. · 1.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine factors important in local-regional recurrence (LRR) in patients with negative sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Z0010 was a prospective multicenter trial initiated in 1999 by the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group to evaluate occult disease in SLNs and bone marrow of early-stage breast cancer patients. Participants included women with biopsy-proven T1-2 breast cancer with clinically negative nodes, planned for lumpectomy and whole breast irradiation. Women with clinical T1-2,N0,M0 disease underwent lumpectomy and SLN dissection. There was no axillary-specific treatment for H&E-negative SLNs, and clinicians were blinded to immunohistochemistry results. Systemic therapy was based on primary tumor factors. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to determine clinicopathologic factors associated with LRR. Of 5119 patients, 3904 (76.3%) had H&E-negative SLNs. Median age was 57 years (range 23-95). At median follow-up of 8.4 years, there were 127 local, 20 regional, and 134 distant recurrences. Factors associated with local-regional recurrence were hormone receptor-negative disease (P = 0.0004) and younger age (P = 0.047). In competing risk-regression models, hormone receptor-positive disease and use of chemotherapy were associated with reduction in local-regional recurrence. When local recurrence was included in the model as a time-dependent variable, older age, T2 disease, high tumor grade, and local recurrence were associated with reduced overall survival. Local-regional recurrences are rare in early-stage breast cancer patients with H&E-negative SLNs. Younger age and hormone receptor-negative disease are associated with higher event rates, and local recurrence is associated with reduced overall survival.
    Annals of surgery 08/2012; 256(3):428-36. · 7.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study describes a modified intraoperative method for cavity margin (CM) assessment in place of lumpectomy margin assessment in patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery (BCS). This is a retrospective review of 422 breast cancer patients undergoing BCS with intraoperative CM assessment. After an initial lumpectomy with intent to obtain ≥1-cm margins, separate specimens 1 × 1 cm, 0.5-cm thick were taken from the cavity margin circumferentially. These were frozen without reference to the side of the new margin as a time-saving measure, and parallel sections of the resected surface were evaluated. After a median follow-up of 55.5 months, a cumulative 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival rate of 95.3 %, metastasis-free survival rate of 97.8 %, disease-free survival rate of 88.3 %, and overall survival rate of 96.0 %, was achieved. The CM positivity rates were of no statistical difference when <7, 7-8, and >8 CMs were assessed. The second operation rate was 3.5 % because of the false-negative results of the frozen section analysis on CMs. Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that a higher pN stage and cT stage as well as a lack of adjuvant chemotherapy or radiation demonstrated significantly worse clinical outcomes. Locoregional recurrences and metastasis are both correlated with worse overall survival. The number of the CMs assessed was not associated with clinical outcomes. The modified CM assessment presented here is a rapid, accurate, and oncologically safe approach for margin evaluation in BCS patients. Lumpectomy margin assessment might be spared when this method is used.
    Annals of Surgical Oncology 04/2012; 19(11):3386-94. · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea is a serious concern for women undergoing cancer therapy. This prospective randomized trial evaluated the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog triptorelin to preserve ovarian function in women treated with chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Premenopausal women age 44 years or younger were randomly assigned to receive either triptorelin or no triptorelin during (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy and were further stratified by age (< 35, 35 to 39, > 39 years), estrogen receptor status, and chemotherapy regimen. Objectives included the resumption of menses and serial monitoring of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and inhibin A and B levels. Targeted for 124 patients with a planned 5-year follow-up, the trial was stopped for futility after 49 patients were enrolled (median age, 39 years; range, 21 to 43 years); 47 patients were treated according to assigned groups with four cycles of adriamycin plus cyclophosphamide alone or followed by four cycles of paclitaxel or six cycles of fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide. Menstruation resumed in 19 (90%) of 21 patients in the control group and in 23 (88%) of 26 in the triptorelin group (P= .36). Menses returned after a median of 5.8 months (range, 1 to 19 months) after completion of chemotherapy in the triptorelin versus 5.0 months (range, 0 to 28 months) in the control arm (P= .58). Two patients (age 26 and 35 years at random assignment) in the control group had spontaneous pregnancies with term deliveries. FSH and inhibin B levels correlated with menstrual status. When stratified for age, estrogen receptor status, and treatment regimen, amenorrhea rates on triptorelin were comparable to those seen in the control group.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 02/2012; 30(5):533-8. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives. This randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine immune recovery following breast cancer (BC) therapy and evaluate the effect of mindfulness-based stress reduction therapy (MBSR) on immune recovery with emphasis on lymphocyte subsets, T cell activation, and production of T-helper 1 (Th1; interferon [IFN]-γ) and T-helper 2 (Th2; interleukin-4 [IL-4]) cytokines. Method. Participants who completed the study consisted of 82 patients diagnosed with Stage 0-III BC, who received lumpectomy and adjuvant radiation ± chemotherapy. Patients were randomized into an MBSR(BC) intervention program or a control (usual care) group. Immune cell measures were assessed at baseline and within 2 weeks after the 6-week intervention. The numbers and percentages of lymphocyte subsets, activated T cells, and Th1 and Th2 cells in peripheral blood samples were determined by immunostaining and flow cytometry. Results. Immune subset recovery after cancer treatment showed positive associations with time since treatment completion. The B and natural killer (NK) cells were more susceptible than T cells in being suppressed by cancer treatment. Women who received MBSR(BC) had T cells more readily activated by the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and an increase in the Th1/Th2 ratio. Activation was also higher for the MBSR(BC) group if <12 weeks from the end of treatment and women in MBSR(BC) <12 weeks had higher T cell count for CD4(+). Conclusion. MBSR(BC) promotes a more rapid recovery of functional T cells capable of being activated by a mitogen with the Th1 phenotype, whereas substantial recovery of B and NK cells after completion of cancer treatment appears to occur independent of stress-reducing interventions.
    Biological Research for Nursing 11/2011; · 1.85 Impact Factor
  • The Breast Journal 07/2011; 17(4):335-6. · 1.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prior ipsilateral completion axillary lymph node dissection (CALND) may be considered a contraindication to performing a sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping in a patient with recurrent breast carcinoma. However, reoperative SLN biopsy following axillary dissection would determine if alternative lymphatic drainage pathways exist. If nodes were found to contain metastatic disease, staging and locoregional control of the disease could be affected. An institutional breast cancer database and electronic health record (IRB No. 102554) prospectively accrued 6225 patients between 1994 and 2007. Under separate IRB approval (IRB No. 102552), this database was queried for patients with a prior history of CALND who received a SLN biopsy. Patients' demographic, clinical, and treatment variables were recorded. Of the 6225 patients, 45 (0.7%) were identified as having previously undergone breast-conservation surgery, CALND, and ipsilateral reoperative SLN mapping and biopsy. Of the 45 patients, 13 (29%) had a successful ipsilateral reoperative SLN mapping and biopsy. Nonaxillary drainage was identified in 5 patients with reoperative SLN biopsy. Reoperative SLN mapping and biopsy is feasible in the setting of local recurrence after previous CALND. This procedure performed for breast cancer recurrence provides important staging information while identifying extra-axillary drainage that could affect both staging and local control.
    Annals of Surgical Oncology 03/2011; 18(3):727-32. · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) is the accepted standard of care in early-stage breast cancer and cutaneous melanoma. This technology is accurate for nodal staging and determining the prognosis of these patients. There are several randomized controlled trials confirming the accuracy of this technique and confirming its role in reducing morbidity and improving quality of life. It is also gaining increased acceptance in the management of other solid tumors. Despite the established benefits of SLNB as a minimally invasive approach for nodal staging, the procedure is still underutilized in many developing countries. The Human Health Division of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) convened advisory meetings with panels of multidisciplinary experts from different backgrounds with the remit to analyze the difficulties encountered by developing countries in establishing a successful SLNB program. The other remit of the panel was to recommend an effective program based on existing evidence that can be adapted and implemented in developing countries. The experience of some members of the panel in the training for this technique in Asia, Latin America, and Africa provided the insight required for the development of a comprehensive and structured program. The panel included recommendations on the technical aspects of the procedure, as well as a comprehensive training program, including theoretical teaching, practical training in surgical skills, laboratories, and hands-on proctored learning. Particular emphasis was placed on in-built quality assurance requirements to ensure that this powerful staging investigation is implemented with the highest possible standard in the management of cancer patients, with the lowest false negative rate. It is hoped that this article will be a useful resource for our colleagues planning to establish a SLNB program.
    World Journal of Surgery 01/2011; 35(6):1159-68; discussion 1155-8. · 2.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Axillary ultrasound (AUS) with needle biopsy is used to detect metastasis in patients with invasive breast cancers. Our hypothesis is that preoperative AUS significantly reduces sentinel node biopsy (SLNB) use in patients with invasive breast tumors >2 cm upon clinical examination. A single-institution database of patients with breast cancer and AUS was reviewed. Patients with incomplete records, clinical tumor <2 cm, or postoperative AUS were excluded. A control cohort of non-AUS patients with clinical T2 (cT2) or greater disease was identified. Clinicopathologic data were collected. Simple Kappa coefficient and chi-square statistical analyses were performed. AUS was performed in 153 patients vs. 370 controls. Of AUS patients, 112 (73.2%) had cT2 disease vs. 272 (73.5%) controls. Median AUS patient age was 53.7 (range, 22.8-85.8) years vs. 53.8 (range, 26.7-91.6) years; median pathologic tumor was 3.8 (range, 1.0-20.0) cm in AUS patients vs. 2.5 (range, 0.1-11.0) cm. Among AUS patients, 78% had needle biopsy; 85 of 120 (70.8%) were positive. Sixty-eight patients had SLNB: 33 after negative AUS and 35 after negative needle biopsy. Twenty-three SLNB (37.3%) were positive; 15 of 33 after negative AUS and 8 of 35 after a negative needle biopsy. Axillary dissection was performed in 102 of 153 vs. 225 of 370 controls. Sensitivity and specificity of AUS was 86.2% and 40.5%. Sensitivity of AUS plus needle biopsy was 89.3% with 100% specificity. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was given to 49.7% of AUS patients. AUS reduced costs by more than $4,000 per patient. AUS reduces SLNB use and affects treatment in patients with cT2 or greater breast cancer. Routine AUS should be considered in this population.
    Annals of Surgical Oncology 01/2011; 18(1):72-7. · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous plastic surgery procedures such as breast augmentation or reduction mammoplasty can potentially alter the lymphatic drainage of the breast. The purpose of this study is to determine the success rates of sentinel node lymphatic mapping in patients with previous plastic surgical procedures of the breast. A total of 83 patients with a history of plastic surgery of the breast that underwent subsequent sentinel node mapping between 1996 and 2008 were retrospectively analyzed. Eight-three patients that underwent a total of 108 sentinel node biopsies. Hundred cases (93%) previously underwent breast augmentation and eight cases (7%) previously underwent reduction mammoplasty. The mean time between the previous plastic surgical procedures and the sentinel node biopsy was 10.3 years (range: 2 months-32 years). Indications for the mapping procedure were invasive cancer (n = 64), ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 17), and prophylactic mastectomy (n = 27). The identification rate of the sentinel node was 95.3% (103/108). The success rate based on type of procedure was 96% (96/100) for augmentation and 87.5% (7/8) for reduction mammoplasty. With a mean follow-up of 3.4 years, there has been only one local axillary recurrence that occurred at the time of an ipsilateral breast recurrence following lumpectomy. Lymphatic mapping can be successfully performed in patients who have previously undergone plastic surgery operations.
    The Breast Journal 11/2010; 16(6):598-602. · 1.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Breast cancer represents a major public health problem in the world. According to the GLOBOCAN database, breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the most common cancer among women, accounting for an estimated 1,152,161 new cases each year and 411,093 cancer deaths per year (Fig. 4.1) [1]. In the United States, breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women after lung cancer [2]. Recent trends in the incidence of female breast cancer have shown a sharp decrease during the period of 1999–2003. This can be partly explained by the increased utilization of screening mammography, better technologies that increase the sensitivity of detection suspicious abnormalities, and an overall reduction in the use of hormone replacement therapy (Fig. 4.2) [3]. Despite this recent decrease in breast cancer incidence, it is estimated that in the year 2007, more than 178,480 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States, with approximately 40,460 women dying from this disease. Of these, about 5–10% of the total breast cancer burden will be hereditary, having affected approximately 8,924–17,848 patients during 2007 [2].
    10/2010: pages 51-104;
  • The Breast Journal 01/2010; 16(2):208-10. · 1.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bilateral/contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (PM) is offered to high-risk women to decrease their actual or perceived breast cancer risk. When an invasive occult cancer is identified, prevailing wisdom suggests that an axillary dissection be performed. This single-institution study aims to identify patients who may benefit from sentinel node biopsy (SLNB) at the time of prophylactic mastectomy. We performed a retrospective review of a prospective database of patients treated at our institution with bilateral/contralateral PM between 1995 and 2006. We examined patients' clinicopathologic characteristics in comparison with their incidence of occult cancer in the contralateral breast or axilla. There were 449 patients who underwent PM and SLNB. Twenty-eight underwent bilateral PM. Of the 28, no occult cancers were identified. Occult cancers were identified in 18 of 420 (4.3%) contralateral prophylactic specimens; they were invasive in 6 (1.4%). In cases of occult carcinoma, the primary established tumor was more likely to be of invasive lobular histology. Eight of 420 (2%) patients had a positive contralateral sentinel node, and within this subset of 8 patients the majority had locally advanced disease on the known tumor side. Other features associated with a positive contralateral sentinel node included the presence of lymphovascular involvement or skin or nipple involvement and grade 2 to 3 invasive primary established tumors. Overall, SLNB in patients undergoing bilateral PM or contralateral PM associated with early-stage disease is not indicated. But patients with locally advanced primary breast cancers have a significantly increased risk of occult cancer in the contralateral axilla, likely due to crossover metastasis; this select group of patients may benefit from SLNB at the time of surgery.
    Journal of the American College of Surgeons 12/2009; 209(6):746-52; quiz 800-1. · 4.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Wire-localized breast biopsy (WLBB) remains the standard method for the surgical excision of nonpalpable breast lesions. Because of many of its shortcomings, most important a high microscopic positive margin rate, alternative approaches have been described, including radioactive seed localization (RSL). This review highlights the literature regarding RSL, including safety, the ease of the procedure, billing, and oncologic outcomes. Medline and PubMed were searched using the terms "radioactive seed" and "breast." All peer-reviewed studies were included in this review. RSL is a promising approach for the resection of nonpalpable breast lesions. It is a reliable and safe alternative to WLBB. RSL is at least equivalent compared with WLBB in terms of the ease of the procedure, removing the target lesion, the volume of breast tissue excised, obtaining negative margins, avoiding a second operative intervention, and allowing for simultaneous axillary staging.
    American journal of surgery 11/2009; 199(4):522-8. · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies suggest local surgical therapy improves survival in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). We evaluate the difference in outcome in patients with MBC after mastectomy versus breast conservation (BCT) and factors that influence outcome. In a retrospective review of our prospective database, we identified patients who presented with MBC (1990 to 2007). Patient surgery type and clinicopathologic factors were reviewed. We compared OS between pts dependent on surgery and clinicopathologic factors. Of the 566 patients with MBC, 154 (27%) underwent removal of the primary tumor. Surgery was associated with an improved OS (33%) versus no surgery (20%) (P = 0.0015). Of those undergoing local therapy; mastectomy was associated with a 37% OS vs BCT with a 20% OS (P = 0.04). Our study confirms that removal of the primary tumor in MBC is associated with improved overall survival. It appears that mastectomy is associated with a significantly improved overall survival.
    American journal of surgery 10/2009; 198(4):511-5. · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Considerable morbidity persists among survivors of breast cancer (BC) including high levels of psychological stress, anxiety, depression, fear of recurrence, and physical symptoms including pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbances, and impaired quality of life. Effective interventions are needed during this difficult transitional period. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of 84 female BC survivors (Stages 0-III) recruited from the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer and Research Institute. All subjects were within 18 months of treatment completion with surgery and adjuvant radiation and/or chemotherapy. Subjects were randomly assigned to a 6-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program designed to self-regulate arousal to stressful circumstances or symptoms (n=41) or to usual care (n=43). Outcome measures compared at 6 weeks by random assignment included validated measures of psychological status (depression, anxiety, perceived stress, fear of recurrence, optimism, social support) and psychological and physical subscales of quality of life (SF-36). Compared with usual care, subjects assigned to MBSR(BC) had significantly lower (two-sided p<0.05) adjusted mean levels of depression (6.3 vs 9.6), anxiety (28.3 vs 33.0), and fear of recurrence (9.3 vs 11.6) at 6 weeks, along with higher energy (53.5 vs 49.2), physical functioning (50.1 vs 47.0), and physical role functioning (49.1 vs 42.8). In stratified analyses, subjects more compliant with MBSR tended to experience greater improvements in measures of energy and physical functioning. Among BC survivors within 18 months of treatment completion, a 6-week MBSR(BC) program resulted in significant improvements in psychological status and quality of life compared with usual care.
    Psycho-Oncology 03/2009; 18(12):1261-72. · 3.51 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

5k Citations
488.52 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1989–2014
    • University of South Florida
      • • Department of Surgery
      • • College of Nursing
      Tampa, Florida, United States
  • 2011
    • USF Health Byrd Alzheimer's Institute
      Tampa, Florida, United States
  • 1990–2010
    • Moffitt Cancer Center
      Tampa, Florida, United States
  • 2009
    • Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research
      • Department of Surgery
      Scottsdale, AZ, United States
  • 2003–2004
    • Lakeland Regional Medical Center
      Lakeland, Florida, United States
  • 2002
    • Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
      Seattle, Washington, United States