Zu-Jun Yang

University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Hua-yang, Sichuan, China

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Publications (35)34.46 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Although the unique properties of wheat α-gliadin gene family are well characterized, little is known about the evolution and genomic divergence of α-gliadin gene family within the Triticeae. We isolated a total of 203 α-gliadin gene sequences from 11 representative diploid and polyploid Triticeae species, and found 108 sequences putatively functional. Our results indicate that α-gliadin genes may have possibly originated from wild Secale species, where the sequences contain the shortest repetitive domains and display minimum variation. A miniature inverted-repeat transposable element insertion is reported for the first time in α-gliadin gene sequence of Thinopyrum intermedium in this study, indicating that the transposable element might have contributed to the diversification of α-gliadin genes family among Triticeae genomes. The phylogenetic analyses revealed that the α-gliadin gene sequences of Dasypyrum, Australopyrum, Lophopyrum, Eremopyrum and Pseudoroengeria species have amplified several times. A search for four typical toxic epitopes for celiac disease within the Triticeae α-gliadin gene sequences showed that the α-gliadins of wild Secale, Australopyrum and Agropyron genomes lack all four epitopes, while other Triticeae species have accumulated these epitopes, suggesting that the evolution of these toxic epitopes sequences occurred during the course of speciation, domestication or polyploidization of Triticeae.
    Journal of Genetics 12/2014; 93(3):725-31. DOI:10.1007/s12041-014-0441-5 · 1.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The introduction of genetic variation from wild and cultivated Triticeae species has been a long-standing approach for wheat improvement. Dasypyrumbreviaristatum species harbor novel and agronomically important genes for resistance against multi-fungal diseases. The development of new wheat-D. breviaristatum introgression lines offers chances for the identification of stripe rust resistance gene(s). A wheat line, D11-5, was selected from a cross between wheat line MY11 and wheat-D. breviaristatum partial amphiploid TDH-2. It was characterized by FISH and PCR-based molecular markers. Chromosome counting revealed that the D11-5 line shows a hexaploid set of 2n = 6x = 42 chromosomes. FISH analysis using the Dasypyrum repetitive sequence pDb12H as a probe demonstrated that D11-5 contained a pair of D. breviaristatum chromosomes, while FISH with wheat D-genomic repetitive sequences revealed that the chromosome 2D was absent in D11-5. The functional molecular markers confirmed that the introduced D. breviaristatum chromosomes belong to the homoeologous group 2, indicating that D11-5 was a 2V(b) (2D) disomic substitution line. Field resistance showed that the introduced D. breviaristatum chromosomes 2V(b) were responsible for the stripe rust resistance at the adult plant stage. FISH, C-banding, and PCR-based molecular marker analysis indicated that the chromosome 2V(b) of D. breviaristatum was completely different from the chromosome 2V of D. villosum. The identified wheat-D. breviaristatum chromosome substitution line D11-5 may be applied to produce agronomically desirable stripe rust resistance germplasm. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.
    Cytogenetic and Genome Research 09/2014; 143(4). DOI:10.1159/000366051 · 1.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The wild species, Secale africanum Stapf., serves as a valuable germplasm resource for increasing the diversity of cultivated rye (Secale cereale L.) and providing novel genes for wheat improvement. The objective of this study was to identify new wheat-S. africanum chromosome 2Rafr derivatives by molecular markers and in situ hybridization, and to test the effects of centric translocations of S. africanum chromosome 2Rafr on disease resistance and agronomic performance of wheat. The T2RafrS.2DL and T2DS.2RafrL translocations, and other S. africanum chromosome introgressions such as a 2Rafr substitution as well as monotelo-2RafrS and 2RafrL addition lines, were identified by the genomic in situ hybridization and sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Twenty-three molecular markers were localized on chromosome 2Rafr arms which will facilitate future identification of their introgressions into wheat. A comparison of FISH patterns and the molecular marker distribution between the S. africanum chromosome 2Rafr and cultivated rye chromosome 2R indicates differentiation between the wild and cultivated Secale genomes. Tests of disease resistance and agronomic performance of wheat-S. africanum chromosome 2Rafr derivatives indicated that chromosome 2RafrL carried gene(s) for dwarfing and stripe rust resistance, while the 2RafrS translocation line was the most favorable for agronomic performance when compared with the substitution and 2RafrL translocation lines. These results encourage the continued use of novel wheat-S. africanum 2Rafr derivative lines in wheat improvement.
    Euphytica 11/2013; 194(2). DOI:10.1007/s10681-013-0913-3 · 1.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite rapid progress in understanding the mechanisms that shape the evolution of proteins, the relative importance of various factors remain to be elucidated. In this study, we have assessed the effects of 16 different biological features on the evolutionary rates (ERs) of protein-coding sequences in bacterial genomes. Our analysis of 18 bacterial species revealed new correlations between ERs and constraining factors. Previous studies have suggested that transcriptional abundance overwhelmingly constrains the evolution of yeast protein sequences. This transcriptional abundance leads to selection against misfolding or misinteractions. In this study we found that there was no single factor in determining the evolution of bacterial proteins. Not only transcriptional abundance (codon adaptation index and expression level), but also protein-protein associations (PPAs), essentiality (ESS), subcellular localization of cytoplasmic membrane (SLM), transmembrane helices (TMH) and hydropathicity score (HS) independently and significantly affected the ERs of bacterial proteins. In some species, PPA and ESS demonstrate higher correlations with ER than transcriptional abundance. Different forces drive the evolution of protein sequences in yeast and bacteria. In bacteria, the constraints are involved in avoiding a build-up of toxic molecules caused by misfolding/misinteraction (transcriptional abundance), while retaining important functions (ESS, PPA) and maintaining the cell membrane (SLM, TMH and HS). Each of these independently contributes to the variation in protein evolution.
    BMC Evolutionary Biology 08/2013; 13:162. DOI:10.1186/1471-2148-13-162 · 3.41 Impact Factor
  • Tao Zhang, Zu-Jun Yang
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    ABSTRACT: Eukaryotes's gene expression and regulation relies on the interaction of their cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors. The cis-elements are specific DNA sequences in the genome and frequently located in the untranslated regions. The trans-acting factors are usually considered to be proteins that bind to the cis-acting sequences to regulate gene expression. It is well known that the cis-elements are always associated with DNase I hypersensitive site, which is a signature of open chromatin. The identification of all the functional cis-element using high-throughput method in plant genome has not been initiated in plant genomes. With the rapid achievement of genomics studies, an increasing number of plant genomes have been sequenced. Genome-wide identification of DNase I hypersensitive sites will be a considerably efficient method to locate cis-element in plants, which will provide a vital potential for further plant functional genomics. The present review is to reveal the recent progresses on identification and analysis of DNase I hypersensitive site in plant genomes.
    Hereditas (Beijing) 07/2013; 35(7):867-74. DOI:10.3724/SP.J.1005.2013.00867
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    ABSTRACT: Thinopyrum intermedium has been hybridized extensively with wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and several genes for disease resistance have been introgressed to cultivated wheat. However, there are very few reports about the Th. intermedium-derived seed storage protein genes which have been transferred into a wheat background by chromosome manipulation. Our aim is to identify several wheat–Th. intermedium ssp. trichophorum derivatives, and document these lines by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), molecular markers and seed storage protein analysis. We found that a novel Th. intermedium 1St#2 chromosome-specific high-molecular-weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) was transferred to the wheat–Thinopyrum derivative lines. The genomic sequence of the Thinopyrum-derived HMW-GS was characterized and designated Glu-1St#2x, since it resembled x-type glutenins in both the N-terminal domain and C-terminal domain. It is much shorter than that of reported HMW-GS genes. The Glu-1St#2x sequence was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and resulted in the identical weight to the native protein. The GISH and newly developed chromosome Thinopyrum-specific DNA markers enabled physically location of Glu-1St#2x to the region FL0.60–1.00 on Th. intermedium 1St#2L chromosome arm. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Glu-1St#2x evolved earlier than other x-type HMW-GS homoeologues in modern wheat genomes. The effect of Glu-1St#2x on protein content, sodium dodecyl sulphate sedimentation value and improvement of solvent retention capacity in wheat background suggested that Th. intermedium chromosome 1St#2 may have potential for improvement of wheat end-product quality.
    Molecular Breeding 04/2013; 31(4). DOI:10.1007/s11032-013-9838-8 · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Wheat leaf rust, one of the most major diseases of wheat, greatly reduce wheat yield when wheat cultivars are infected. It is important to continuously screen and obtain new resistance sources for wheat breeding due to the resistance losses caused by mutant of leaf rust races. Wheat-alien species harbor resistance gene(s) which could be transferred to wheat for wheat breeding purpose. In this research, we screened and characterized new leaf rust resistance sources from wheat-alien species amphiploids, additions, substitutions and translocations for further using these germplasm. Leaf rust complex isolates (Lrcomp)(from Kansas State) and 09-9-1441-1 etc. five leaf rust isolates (from China), were inoculated to germplasm at seedling stage, and were scored for infection types. Total 31 from 116 germplasm are immune or highly resistant to Lrcomp. Part of germplasm included Aegilops searsii, Ae. caudate, Ae. speltoide, Ae. biuncialis, Ae. geniculata, Ae. sharonensis, Ae. peregrina, Ae. comosa, Ae. umbellulata, Ae. ventricosa, Thinopyrum intermedium, Th. intermedium ssp. trichophoru, Th. elongatum, Elymus trachycaulus, Secale cereale, S. africanum or Triticum timopheevi chromatin are immune or highly resistant to Lrcomp, while germplasm which contain Ae. bicornis, Ae. mutica, Agropyron scirpeum, Dasypyrum breviaristatum or D. villosum chromatin are susceptible to Lrcomp. Aegilops searsii 4Ss chromosome, Ae. caudate C#1 and D#1 chromosmes, and Ae. biuncialis, Ae. comosa may harbor new wheat leaf rust resistance gene which need further research. Wheat-E. trachycaulus Robertsonian translocation line 1HtS.1BL, nearly immune to Lrcomp and other five leaf rust isolates indicating that it is worth to make small chromosome translocation by chromosome engineering for wheat breeding purpose.
    01/2013; 14(5).
  • Journal of Genetics 12/2012; 91(3):343-8. DOI:10.1007/s12041-012-0181-3 · 1.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Wild Secale species, Secale africanum Stapf., serve as a valuable source for increasing the diversity of cultivated rye (Secale cereale L.) and provide novel genes for wheat improvement. New wheat - S. africanum chromosome 1R(afr) addition, 1R(afr)(1D) substitution, 1BL.1R(afr)S and 1DS.1R(afr)L translocation, and 1R(afr)L monotelocentric addition lines were identified by chromosome banding and in situ hybridization. Disease resistance screening revealed that chromosome 1R(afr)S carries resistance gene(s) to new stripe rust races. Twenty-nine molecular markers were localized on S. africanum chromosome 1R(afr) by the wheat - S. africanum introgression lines. Twenty markers can also identically amplify other reported wheat - S. cereale chromosome 1R derivative lines, indicating that there is high conservation between the wild and cultivated Secale chromosome 1R. Nine markers displayed polymorphic amplification between S. africanum and S. cereale chromosome 1R(afr) derivatives. The comparison of the nucleotide sequences of these polymorphic markers suggested that gene duplication and sequence divergence may have occurred among Secale species during its evolution and domestication.
    Genome 11/2012; 55(11):765-74. DOI:10.1139/g2012-062 · 1.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Thinopyrum elongatum serves as an excellent gene pool for wheat improvement. Genes for resistance to many biotic and abiotic stresses have been transferred from Th. elongatum to wheat through chromosome manipulation. For breeding programs, molecular markers enable screening of a large number of genotypes for alien chromosome introgressions. The main objective of the present study was to develop and characterize EST (expressed sequence tags) and PLUG (PCR-based Landmark Unique Gene) markers that can distinguish Th. elongatum chromatin from the wheat genomes. A total of 258 mapped EST primer pairs and 46 PLUG primer pairs were tested on DNA from wheat Chinese Spring (CS) and CS-Th. elongatum addition lines. The results showed that 43 primer pairs could be effectively mapped to specific Th. elongatum chromosomes. Twenty-two of the 43 markers displayed similar homoeologous chromosome locations to hexaploid wheat. Nine markers mapped to different linkage groups between wheat and Th. elongatum, while 12 makers mapped on two or three different Th. elongatum chromosomes. A comparison of molecular marker locations indicated that Th. elongatum genome was closely related to the D genome of wheat, and chromosome rearrangements and duplication had occurred in Th. elongatum and the wheat genomes. The markers will be useful in comparative gene mapping, chromosome evolutionary analysis, and gene introgression for wheat improvement using Th. elongatum accessions as gene donors.
    Genes & genomics 02/2012; 34(1). DOI:10.1007/s13258-011-0153-7 · 0.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Stripe rust and powdery mildew, caused respectively by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) and Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt), are globally important diseases of wheat. Genes transferred to wheat from wild species are often associated with deleterious traits. In this study, a wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium germplasm line CH7124 was characterized by a combination of resistance evaluation, cytological observation and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). Disease screening demonstrated this line was highly resistant to both Pst races CYR29, CYR31, CYR32 and CYR33 and Bgt isolates E09, E20, E21 and E26, which are the most widely virulent pathotypes in China and virulent to most of the known resistance genes, and the resistance derived from Th. intermedium. Genetic analysis of the F1, F2, F3 and BC1 populations from resistant line CH7124 revealed that the resistance to powdery mildew and stripe rust was controlled by a single dominant allele. Mitotic observation showed that CH7124 had 42 chromosomes, and the chromosomes in most pollen mother cells of its F1s involved wheat genotypes Chinese Spring and Mianyang 11 at PMC MI formed 21 bivalents, averaging, respectively, 20.73 in 102 cells and 20.74 in 87 cells, suggesting stability of CH7124 in cytology and regular pairing with common wheat. As no signal could be detected when using genomic Th. intermedium DNA as a probe in the GISH experiment, the introgressed alien chromatin in this line was very small and cytologically undetectable, further indicating that CH7124 is a cryptic wheat-alien introgression line. This study showed that CH7124 appears to serve as a novel resistance source for wheat breeding.
    01/2012; 13(4).
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    ABSTRACT: We present the first characterization of 360 sequences in six species of the genus Secale of both cultivated and wild accessions. These include four distinct kinds of dispersed repetitive DNA sequences named pSc20H, pSc119.1, pSaO5(411), and pSaD15(940) belonging to the Revolver family. During the evolution of the genus Secale from wild to cultivated accessions, the pSaO5(411)-like sequences became shorter mainly because of the deletion of a trinucleotide tandem repeating unit, the pSc20H-like sequences displayed apparent homogenization in cultivated rye, and the second intron of Revolver became longer. In addition, the pSc20H-, pSc119.1-, and pSaO5(411)-like sequences cloned from wild rye and cultivated rye could be divided into two large clades. No single case of the four kinds of repetitive elements has been inherited by each Secale accession from a lone ancestor. It is reasonable to consider the vertical transmission of the four repetitive elements during the evolution of the genus Secale. The pSc20H- and pSaO5(411)-like sequences showed evolutionary elimination at specific chromosomal locations from wild species to cultivated species. These cases imply that different repetitive DNA sequences have played different roles in the chromosome development and genomic evolution of rye. The present study adds important information to the investigations dealing with characterization of dispersed repetitive elements in wild and cultivated rye.
    Genome 04/2011; 54(4):285-300. DOI:10.1139/g10-118 · 1.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Stripe rust (caused by Puccinia striiformis) occurs annually in most wheat-growing areas of the world. Thinopyrum ponticum has provided novel rust resistance genes to protect wheat from this fungal disease. Wheat - Th. ponticum partial amphiploid line 7430 and a substitution line X005 developed from crosses between wheat and 7430 were resistant to stripe rust isolates from China. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) analysis using Pseudoroegneria spicata genomic DNA as a probe demonstrated that the partial amphiploid line 7430 contained ten J(s) and six J genome chromosomes, and line X005 had a pair of J(s)-chromosomes. Giemsa-C banding further revealed that both lines 7430 and X005 were absent of wheat chromosomes 6B. The EST based PCR confirmed that the introduced J(s) chromosomes belonging to linkage group 6, indicating that line X005 was a 6J(s)/6B substitution line. Both resistance observation and sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers displayed that the introduced chromosomes 6J(s) were responsible for the stripe rust resistances. Therefore, lines 7430 and X005 can be used as a donor in wheat breeding for stripe rust resistance.
    Journal of applied genetics 03/2011; 52(3):279-85. DOI:10.1007/s13353-011-0038-0 · 1.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A new wheat-Thinopyrum substitution line AS1677, developed from a cross between wheat line ML-13 and wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium ssp. trichophorum partial amphiploid TE-3, was characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), sequential Giemsa-C banding, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), seed storage protein electrophoresis, molecular marker analysis and disease resistance screening. Sequential Giemsa-C banding and GISH using Pseudoroegneria spicata genomic DNA as probe indicated that a pair of St-chromosomes with strong terminal bands were introduced into AS1677. FISH using pTa71 as a probe gave strong hybridization signals at the nuclear organization region and in the distal region of the short arms of the St chromosome. Moreover, FISH using the repetitive sequence pAs1 revealed that a pair of wheat 1D chromosomes was absent in accession AS1677. Seed storage proteins separated by acid polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (APAGE) and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) confirmed that AS1677 lacked the gliadin and glutenin bands encoded by Gli-D1 and Glu-D1, further confirming the absence of chromosome 1D. The introduced St chromosome pair belonging to homoeologous group 1 was identified by newly produced genome specific markers. AS1677 is a new 1St (1D) substitution line. When inoculated with stripe rust and powdery mildew isolates, AS1677 expressed stripe rust resistance possibly derived from its Thinopyrum parent. AS1677 can be used as a donor source for introducing novel disease resistance genes to wheat in breeding programs aided by molecular and cytogenetic markers. KeywordsC-banding-In situ hybridization-Stripe rust resistance- Thinopyrum intermedium ssp. trichophorum -Alien substitution line
    Euphytica 01/2011; 177(2):169-177. DOI:10.1007/s10681-010-0216-x · 1.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Partial amphiploids between wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and Thinopyrum species play an important role in the transfer and use of traits from alien species. A wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium partial amphiploid, TAI8335, and its alien parent were characterized by a combination of genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and cytological observations. Evidence from GISH indicated that the donor parent Th. intermedium possessed seven pairs of S, seven J(s) and 21 J chromosomes. Mitotic observation showed that the majority of TAI8335 plants had 56 chromosomes, but a few had 54 to 55, in some cases with two to three additional telochromosomes. The chromosomes in most pollen mother cells of plants with 2n = 56 formed 28 bivalents, averaging 27.12 in 223 cells, suggesting a basic cytological stability. Sequential GISH patterns using genomic Pseudoroegneria spicata and genomic Th. intermedium DNA as probes revealed that TAI8335 had fourteen chromosomes derived from Th. intermedium and its alien genome consisted of one pair of S-, three pairs of J(s) - and one pair of J-genome chromosomes as well as two translocated chromosome pairs, one being a Robertsonian translocation and another an intercalary translocation, both of which involved J and S genome. Two of the telochromosomes in the aneuploid plants originated from the J genome and one from wheat. Disease screening demonstrated this line was highly resistant to leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust and powdery mildew. This study showed that the partial amphiploid TAI8335 appears to serve as a novel source for the transfer of resistance genes for multiple fungal pathogens to wheat.
    Hereditas 12/2010; 147(6):304-12. DOI:10.1111/j.1601-5223.2010.02156.x · 0.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The genus Dasypyrum (or Haynaldia) consists of two species, D. villosum and D. breviaristatum. However, the genomic relationships between these two species remain unclear. The objective of this study was to provide molecular phylogenic and cytological evidence on the evolutionary relationships of the genus Dasypyrum. Sequences of Chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) and α-gliadin genes both support the hypothesis that diploid D. breviaristatum is the progenitor of tetraploid D. breviaristatum, and the diploid D. villosum and D. breviaristatum evolved parallel from an ancestral species. Genomic and fluorescence in situ hybridization using ribosomal DNA and rye repetitive DNA sequence as probes also indicated that tetraploid D. breviaristatum originated from diploid D. breviaristatum.
    Plant Systematics and Evolution 07/2010; 288(3-4):149-156. DOI:10.1007/s00606-010-0319-9 · 1.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The 1BL.1RS wheat-rye translocation from Petkus rye has contributed substantially to the world wheat production. However, following the breakdown of disease resistance genes in 1RS, its importance for wheat improvement decreased. We have developed a new 1BL.1RS line, R14, by means of crossing rye inbred line L155, selected from Petkus rye to several wheat cultivars. One new gene each, for stripe rust and powdery mildew resistance, located on 1RS of the line R14, are tentatively named YrCn17 and PmCn17. YrCn17 and PmCn17 confer resistance to Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici pathotypes that are virulent on Yr9, and Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici pathotypes virulent on Pm8. These two new resistances, YrCn17 and PmCn17, are now available for wheat improvement programs. The present study indicates that rye cultivars may carry yet untapped variations as potential sources of resistance.
    Euphytica 09/2009; 169(2):207-213. DOI:10.1007/s10681-009-9924-5 · 1.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Two amphiploids, AF-1(Triticum aestivum L. cv. Anyuepaideng–Secale africanum Stapf.) and BF-1 (T. turgidum ssp. carthlicum–S. africanum), were evaluated by chromosomal banding and in situ hybridization. The individual S. africanum chromosomes were identified in the BF-1 background by sequential C-banding and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), and were distinguishable from those of S. cereale, because they exhibited less terminal heterochromatin. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the tandem repeat pSc250 as a probe indicated that only 6Ra of S. africanum contained a significant hybrid signal, whereas S. cereale displayed strong hybridization at the telomeres or subtelomeres in all seven pairs of chromosomes. Extensive wheat–S. africanum non-Robertsonian translocations were observed in both AF-1 and BF-1 plants, suggesting a frequent occurrence of chromosomal recombination between wheat and S. africanum. Moreover, introgression lines selected from the progeny of wheat/AF-1 crosses were resistant when field tested with widely virulent strains of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici. Three highly resistant lines were selected. GISH and C-banding revealed that resistant line L9-15 carried a pair of 1BL.1RS translocated chromosomes. This new type of S. africanum derived wheat–Secale translocation line with resistance to Yr9-virulent strains will broaden the genetic diversity of 1BL.1RS for wheat breeding.
    Euphytica 01/2009; 167(2):197-202. DOI:10.1007/s10681-008-9861-8 · 1.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genome in situ hybridization (GISH) analysis of wheat-Secale africanum amphiploid revealed that the S. africanum genome displayed significant divergence to the Secale cereale genome. It is thus valuable to deploy genes from S. africanum. We performed the PCR analysis on S. africanum, wheat-S. afticanum amphiploid, T. eastivum cv. Anyuepaideng and other genetic stocks by 100 ISSR primers. A specific segment of 561 bp, named pSaUBC815561, was obtained from S. africanum using primer UBC815. This segment was not amplified from the control wheat lines. Primer UBC815 also am-plified fragments from wild species of genus Secale, including S. vavilovii, S. sylvestre, and other cultivated ryes. Based on the sequence of pSaUBC815561, a pair of special primers U815-F and U815-R was designed and was used to amplify the DNA of wheat related species in Triticeae aimed at validating the specificity of pSaUBC815561. PCR analysis indicated that this specific DNA fragment was amplified not only from a set of Chinese Spring wheat-Imperial rye chromosome addition lines but also from certain wheat-rye introgression lines. Therefore, pSaUBC815561 can be used as a specific marker for detection of chromosomes of Secale genome in wheat.
    Hereditas (Beijing) 09/2008; 30(8):1056-62. DOI:10.3724/SP.J.1005.2008.011056

Publication Stats

149 Citations
34.46 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005–2014
    • University of Electronic Science and Technology of China
      • School of Life Science and Technology
      Hua-yang, Sichuan, China
  • 2010
    • Millet Research Institute Shanxi Academy of Agricultural Science
      Shanxi, Liaoning, China
  • 2006
    • Sichuan Agricultural University
      Hua-yang, Sichuan, China