Lan Chen

Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China

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Publications (5)5.26 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: In recent years, adverse health effects of chemicals from electronic waste (e-waste) have been reported. However, little is known about the genotoxic effects of chemicals in e-waste. In the present study, air concentrations of the toxic metals at e-waste and control sites were analyzed using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Levels of toxic metals (lead, copper and cadmium) in blood and urine were detected using atomic absorption spectrophotometry in 48 exposed individuals and 56 age- and sex-matched controls. The frequencies of lymphocytic micronucleated binucleated cells (MNBNCs) were determined using a cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. Results indicated that blood lead levels were significantly higher in the exposed group (median: 11.449 μg/dL, 1st/3rd quartiles: 9.351-14.410 μg/dL) than in the control group (median: 9.104 μg/dL, 1st/3rd quartiles: 7.275-11.389 μg/dL). The exposed group had higher MNBNCs frequencies (median: 4.0 per thousand, 1st/3rd quartiles: 2.0-7.0 per thousand) compared with the controls (median: 1.0 per thousand, 1st/3rd quartiles: 0.0-2.0 per thousand). Additionally, MNBNCs frequencies and blood lead levels were positively correlated (r = 0.254, p<0.01). Further analysis suggested that a history of working with e-waste was a predictor for increased blood lead levels and MNBNCs frequencies in the subjects. The results suggest that both the living and occupational environments at the e-waste site may be risk factors for increased MNBNCs frequencies among those who are exposed.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 01/2011; 46(6):669-76.
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    ABSTRACT: In the present study, we investigated whether genetic polymorphisms of metabolic enzymes in an exposed population were associated with genotoxic effects of the pollutants from e-waste in 58 subjects (the exposed) resided in a typical e-waste recycling site and 80 subjects (the controls) from a village away from the recycling site. Effects of genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) (GSTT1 and GSTM1) on the frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells (MNed BNC) in peripheral blood lymphocytes were evaluated. GSTM1 and GSTT1 were typed using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism methods. Cytogenetic alterations were evaluated using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. The MNed BNC frequency was significantly higher in the exposed group (median: 4.0 per thousand, IQR: 2.0-7.0 per thousand) than in the control group (median: 1.0 per thousand, IQR: 0.0-2.0 per thousand, P < 0.01 for both comparisons); sera GST activities were also higher in the exposed subjects with either non-null GSTT1 (mean +/- SD: 20.27 +/- 6.43) or non-null GSTM1 (mean +/- SD: 19.71 +/- 4.89) than in the controls (mean +/- SD: 18.79 +/- 4.91 and 19.34 +/- 6.42, respectively, P < 0.05 for both). Although the increased MNed BNC frequencies among the exposed group may be associated with the co-exposure of various chemical pollutants in the environment, there was no statistical evidence of an association between GSTs genotypes and frequencies of micronuclei in the study population. Because this study size was small, the mechanism of genotoxic effects caused by exposure to e-waste needs to be further validated in larger studies.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances & Environmental Engineering 03/2010; 45(4):490-7.
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    ABSTRACT: The levels of thyroid hormones and its receptor expression in the parturient women and the newborns from an electronic waste dismantling region were investigated. We detected the sera levels, including thyroid hormones FT3, FT4, TSH among the subjects from the exposed group (n=48) and the control group (n=45) by immuno radiometric assay (IRMA). The expression levels of TRalpha1, TRbeta1, TSHR mRNA in placentas and umbilical cords were detected by fluorscent quantitative real time PCR (FQ-PCR). The correlation were determined between the thyroid hormones levels in maternal, sera and in umbilical sera, and between the expression levels of its receptors mRNA in placentas and umbilical cords. (1) The FT4 levels of both maternal sera and umbilical cord sera in the exposed group were lower than those in the control (P < 0.05). However, increased the TSH levels in the exposed group were statistically significance compared to the control group (P < 0.05). (2) The TRalPHA1 and TRbeta1 mRNA levels both in placentas and umbilical cords in exposed group were lower than those in control group (P <0.05 and 0.01). However, the TSHR mRNA levels in the exposed group were statistically significance compared to the control group (P < 0.01). (3) The sera FT4 and TSH levels of parturient women were positively correlated with those of the newborns in both groups (P < 0.05 and 0.01). (4) The mRNA levels of TRalpha1, TRbeta1 and TSHR in placentas were positively correlated with those in umbilical cords in both groups (P < 0.01). The findings suggest that some environmental pollutants existing in e-waste dismantling region may affect the health of local parturient women and newborns, representing changes both in sera levels of thyroid hormones and in mRNA expression of its receptors.
    Wei sheng yan jiu = Journal of hygiene research 09/2008; 37(5):536-9.
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, the serum levels, including thyroid hormones free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid stimulating hormone(TSH)among the subjects from the exposed group (n = 48) and the control group (n = 45) were detected by immuno radiometric assay (IRMA). The expression levels of TRα1, TRβ1, TSHR mRNA in placentas and umbilical cords were detected by fluorescent quantitative real-time PCR (FQ-PCR). The correlations between the thyroid hormone levels in maternal serum and umbilical serum, and between the expression levels of its receptors mRNA in placentas and umbilical cords were determined. We found that the FT4 levels of both maternal serum and umbilical cord serum in the exposed group were lower than those in the control (P < 0.05). However, the increased TSH levels in the exposed group had statistically significance compared to those in the control group (P < 0.05). The TRα1 and TRβ1 mRNA levels both in placentas and umbilical cords in the exposed group were lower than those in the control group (P < 0.05 and 0.01). However, the TSHR mRNA levels in the exposed group were significantly different compared to those in the control group (P < 0.01). The serum FT4 and TSH levels of parturient women were positively correlated with those of the newborns in both groups (P < 0.05 and 0.01). The mRNA levels of TRα1, TRβ1 and TSHR in the placentas were positively correlated with those in umbilical cords in both groups (P < 0.01). The findings suggest that some environmental pollutants existing in the electronic waste (e-waste) dismantling region may affect the health of local parturient women and newborns, representing changes both in serum levels of thyroid hormones and in mRNA expression of its receptors.
    Frontiers of Medicine in China 09/2008; 2(3):276-282.
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we recruited 49 subjects from one village close to an electronic waste (e-waste) site (exposed group) and another located 50 km away from the e-waste site (control group). We found that serum levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (median PBDEs, 382 ng/g lipid weight; range, 77-8452 ng/g lipid weight) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (median TSH, 1.79 microIU/mL; range, 0.38-9.03 microIU/mL) and frequencies of micro-nucleated binucleated cells (MNed BNC; median, 5% per hundred; range, 0-96% per hundred) were significantly higher in the exposed group than in the control group (158 ng/g, range of 18-436 ng/g, and p < 0.05; 1.15 microIU/mL, range of 0.48-2.09, and p < 0.01; and 0% per hundred, range of 0-5% per hundred, and p < 0.01, respectively). A history of working with e-waste was significantly associated with increased MNed BNC frequencies (odds ratio (OR), 38.85; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1-1358.71, p = 0.044), independent of years of local residence, a perceived risk factor. However, there was no association between PBDEs exposure and oxidative DNA damage. Therefore, the exposure to PBDEs at the e-waste site may have an effect on the levels of TSH and genetoxic damage among these workers, but this needs to be validated in large studies.
    Environmental Science and Technology 03/2008; 42(6):2195-200. · 5.26 Impact Factor