I N Savvaidis

University of Ioannina, Ioánnina, Ipeiros, Greece

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Publications (69)131.16 Total impact

  • Maria I Tsiraki, Ioannis N Savvaidis
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of packaging (aerobic and vacuum) either with citrus extract, natamycin individually added, or the combination of two, was studied on the shelf-life of a Greek traditional deli salad "Tzatziki" during storage under refrigeration (4°C). Irrespective of the packaging conditions and treatments, yeasts populations of approximately 4.0-6.5logcfu/g were recorded in the microflora of the salad, whereas the Pseudomonas spp. populations were lower (2-3logcfu/g). Tzatziki's overall flavour was better under vacuum, and of all the treatments examined, the addition of citrus extract, and to a letter extent the combination with natamycin, improved the taste and odour (fruity, pleasant, refreshing with reduced garlic typical flavour) of Tzatziki salad. The shelf-life of Tzatziki was extended by ca. >10days (citrus extract, citrus-natamycin) and 5-6days (natamycin, citrus and citrus-natamycin) under aerobic or vacuum, respectively, as compared to the control sample.
    Food Chemistry 01/2014; 142:416-22. · 3.33 Impact Factor
  • L D Kallinteri, O K Kostoula, I N Savvaidis
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    ABSTRACT: The present study evaluated the use of nisin, natamycin and/or their combination as antimicrobial treatments to improve the shelf-life of Galotyri cheese. Samples were treated with nisin [N1 (100 IU/g), N2 (200 IU/g)], natamycin [NA1 (0.01% w/w), NA2 (0.02% w/w)] and their combinations N1-NA1, N1-NA2, N2-NA1 and N2-NA2. A Galotyri control (N0) cheese sample was also tested (absence of nisin or natamycin). Single N1, N2 treatments reduced lactobacilli and lactococci populations, but their effect was less pronounced, as compared to the combined nisin-natamycin treatments between days 14 and 28 of storage. Yeast populations in natamycin-treated Galotyri cheese samples or those additionally treated with nisin were significantly suppressed throughout the entire period of storage. Control N0 or N1, N2 treated samples received significantly lower acceptability scores, as compared to either natamycin or natamycin-nisin treated samples. Natamycin, added either singly or in combination with nisin, efficiently suppressed fungal growth in the Galotyri cheese. The observed shelf life of Galotyri, based on overall acceptability data, was the longest for N1-NA1, N1-NA2, N2-NA1 and N2-NA2 cheese samples (>28 days) followed by the N1, N2 treated samples (18-19 days) whereas for the control N0 a shelf-life of 14-15 days was attained.
    Food Microbiology 12/2013; 36(2):176-81. · 3.41 Impact Factor
  • G C Vasilatos, I N Savvaidis
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    ABSTRACT: In this study fresh turkey meat was packaged under vacuum and stored at 2°C. The following lots were used: T (control); stored under vacuum packaging (VP), T-RO; stored under VP, treated with rosemary oil 0.25% v/w, T-CH; stored under VP, treated with chitosan 1.5% w/v, and T-CH-RO; stored under VP, treated with chitosan 1.5% w/v and rosemary oil 0.25% v/w. Of the microbial microflora species examined, irrespective of treatment, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) constituted the most abundant group. Interestingly, total plate counts (TPCs) and LAB counts, exceeding the limit value of 7logcfu/g, in T and T-RO turkey samples coincided with low taste scores (5 and 6, respectively) on days 12 and 18 of storage. The shelf-life was approximately 10, 17-18 and >21days for the control (T), T-RO, T-CH and T-CH-RO turkey samples, respectively. Thus, a shelf-life extension of 7-8 and >11days was obtained for T-RO and T-CH, and T-CH-RO turkey samples, respectively. The presence of chitosan in T-CH and T-CH-RO samples did not negatively influence the taste of cooked turkey meat.
    International journal of food microbiology 06/2013; 166(1):54-58. · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The qualitative and quantitative profile of biogenic amines (BA) in 50 samples of dry fermented sausages sold in Greek retail markets were determined by HPLC. Putrescine, cadaverine, tryptamine, β-phenylethylamine spermidine, spermine were analysed by UV detection after pre-column derivatization with benzoyl chloride, whereas tyramine and histamine were analysed by fluorescence detection after post-column derivatization with o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA). With the exception of spermidine and spermine a wide variation of BA levels was observed among the samples. Of the BA examined, tyramine, putrescine, histamine and cadaverine showed high concentrations ranging from: 0 to 510mg/kg (median: 197.7mg/kg), 0 to 505mg/kg (median: 96.5mg/kg), 0 to 515mg/kg (median: 7.0mg/kg) and 0 to 690mg/kg (median: 3.6mg/kg), respectively. The histamine content of 28% of the samples exceeded the toxicity limit of 100mg/kg set for histamine in some fish species. Levels of tryptamine and β-phenyl-ethylamine never exceeded 50 and 29mg/kg, respectively. Results of the present study suggest that the amounts of BA in dry fermented sausages, sold in Greek retail markets, may pose a potential health risk for sensitive individuals or for those undergoing classical monoamine oxidase inhibiting (MAOI) drug therapy.
    Food Chemistry 12/2012; 135(4):2750-5. · 3.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study examined the effect of chitosan (1.0% w/v) in combination with packaging on the shelf-life of fresh swordfish steaks. Treatments included the following: A (untreated, control samples stored in air), A-CH (treated with chitosan 1.0% w/v, stored in air), VP (untreated, stored under vacuum packaging) and VP-CH (treated with chitosan, stored under vacuum packaging). VP-CH significantly affected Total Viable Counts (TVC), Pseudomonas spp., H(2)S-producing bacteria (including Shewanella putrefaciens), lactic acid bacteria and Enterobacteriaceae. Production of TMA-N and TVB-N for A-CH, VP and VP-CH swordfish samples was significantly lower than for control (A) samples at day 8 of storage. Histamine formation for all treatments was low. A-CH and VP-CH resulted in significantly lower levels of putrescine, cadaverine and tyramine (day 8) as compared to A and VP swordfish samples. Results of this study indicate that the shelf-life of swordfish steaks can be extended using, either aerobic or vacuum packaging and in combination with chitosan, by approximately 4 (A-CH), 8 (VP) and 12 (VP-CH) days. Swordfish steaks treated with chitosan and stored under VP were sensorially acceptable up to 17days. The presence of chitosan (A-CH and VP-CH) did not negatively influence the taste of cooked swordfish.
    International journal of food microbiology 10/2012; 159(2):101-6. · 3.01 Impact Factor
  • Stefania Papazoglou, Maria Tsiraki, Ioannis N Savvaidis
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    ABSTRACT: In this study fresh chicken liver meat was stored under vacuum packaging (VP) and under refrigeration (4 °C). The following treatments were used: V (control samples, stored under VP), VT1 (thyme oil; 0.1% v/w, stored under VP) and VT2 (thyme oil; 0.3% v/w, stored under VP). Lipid oxidation was low, as judged by determination of malondialdehyde (MDA) values, in vacuum-packaged chicken liver meat, both in the absence or presence of thyme essential oil (EO) during the entire storage period. Of the color parameters (L*, a*, b*) monitored during storage time, L* (lightness) values for vacuum-packaged chicken liver, irrespective of treatment, showed a varying trend, whereas a* (redness) values for V, VT1, and VT2 liver samples decreased, showing no significant differences. As determined by sensory analysis the observed shelf life of chicken liver samples was longest for VT2 (>12 d) followed by VT1 (12 d) and control (V) samples (7 d). Our results suggest that a Brochothrix thermosphact count (7 log CFU/g) and appearance of visible colonies can be used as indicators of chicken liver spoilage.
    Journal of Food Science 08/2012; 77(8):M473-80. · 1.78 Impact Factor
  • S Petrou, M Tsiraki, V Giatrakou, I N Savvaidis
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    ABSTRACT: The present study examined the effect of natural antimicrobials: chitosan, oregano and their combination, on the shelf-life of modified atmosphere packaged chicken breast meat stored at 4°C. Treatments examined in the present study were the following: M (control samples stored under modified atmosphere packaging), M-O (samples treated with oregano oil 0.25% v/w, stored under MAP), M-CH (samples treated with chitosan 1.5% w/v, stored under MAP) and M-CH-O (treated with chitosan 1.5% w/v and oregano oil 0.25% v/w, stored under MAP). Treatment, M-CH-O, significantly affected mesophilic Total Plate Counts (TPC), lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Brochothrix thermosphacta, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas spp., and yeasts-moulds during the storage period. Lipid oxidation (as determined by MDA values) of control and treated chicken samples was in general low and below 0.5 mg MDA/kg, showing no oxidative rancidity during the storage period. Addition of chitosan to the chicken samples produced higher (P<0.05) lightness (L*) values as compared to the control samples. The results of this study indicate that the shelf-life of chicken fillets can be extended using, either oregano oil singly, and/or chitosan, by approximately 6 (M-O) and >15 (M-CH and M-CH-O) days. Interestingly, chitosan (M-CH) or chitosan-oregano (M-CH-O) treated chicken samples were sensorially acceptable during the entire refrigerated storage period of 21 days. It is noteworthy that the presence of chitosan in M-CH and M-CH-O samples did not negatively influence the taste of chicken samples, with M-CH samples receiving a higher score (compared to M-CH-O), probably as a result of a distinct and "spicy" lemon taste of chitosan, that was well received by the panelists. Based primarily on sensory data (taste attribute) M-CH and M-O treatments extended the shelf-life of chicken fillets by 6 days, while M-CH-O treatment resulted in a product with a shelf-life of 14 days, maintaining acceptable sensory characteristics.
    International journal of food microbiology 04/2012; 156(3):264-71. · 3.01 Impact Factor
  • A G Ntzimani, V I Giatrakou, I N Savvaidis
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of natural antimicrobial agents EDTA, lysozyme, and 2 essential oils (rosemary and oregano) on the quality of a ready-to-eat poultry product (semicooked coated; SCC) stored under aerobic packaging conditions at 4°C (retail) and 8°C (abuse) for a period of 16 d. Treatments included the following: air-packaged chicken fillets (control, untreated); with EDTA (1.50% wt/wt); with lysozyme solution (1.50% wt/wt); with rosemary oil (0.20% vol/wt); with oregano oil (0.20% vol/wt); with a combination of EDTA and lysozyme solutions (1.50% wt/wt each); and with the combination of EDTA, lysozyme, and either rosemary or oregano essential oils (all added at concentrations previously mentioned). The shelf life of the SCC samples (untreated and treated) was determined using both microbiological and sensory analyses. Natural antimicrobial combinations consisting of EDTA, lysozyme, and rosemary or oregano essential oil affected the growth of Pseudomonas and yeasts and molds, whereas EDTA, lysozyme, and rosemary essential oil controlled Brochothrix thermosphacta population in the SCC chicken fillets stored at 4 and 8°C. The combination of EDTA, lysozyme, and either rosemary or oregano resulted in a shelf life extension of 5 d compared with the control samples at both 4 and 8°C, with the former combination producing a more sensorially acceptable product.
    Poultry Science 04/2011; 90(4):880-8. · 1.52 Impact Factor
  • A. Hasapidou, I. N. Savvaidis
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    ABSTRACT: Fresh chicken liver meat was packaged in air or under modified atmosphere packaging (MAP; 30%CO2/70%N2) and stored under refrigeration (4°C). The following treatments were used: A (control samples, air packaging), AE [(EDTA (20mM), air packaging)], M (MAP), ME (EDTA, stored under MAP), MER1 [(EDTA, oregano oil (0.1% v/wt), stored under MAP)] and MER2 [(EDTA, oregano oil (0.3% v/wt), stored under MAP)]. Quality evaluation of product stored under above packaging conditions and treated with EDTA and oregano oil was conducted using microbiological, chemical and sensory analyses. Based on mesophilic total viable counts (TVC) a microbiological shelf-life extension of 7, 9, 15 or >15days was obtained for M, ME, MER1 or MER2 liver samples, respectively, compared to the control's (A) shelf-life of 3days. Air-packaged liver samples showed higher pH values in the first 8days of storage compared to M, ME, MER1 and MER2 samples, with the latter showing a significant decrease at the end of the storage period. Interestingly, the presence of the oregano oil in MER1 and MER2 liver resulted in a lower production of TBA compared to all other samples. Based on sensory analysis, MER1 and MER2 extended the shelf-life of chicken liver by 14–15days, while treatments M and ME by 7 and 9days, respectively. Our results support the hypothesis that the shelf-life of chicken liver meat may substantially be extended (by almost 3 times the usual product's shelf-life using a natural antimicrobial combination (EDTA, oregano oil and MAP).
    Food Research International - FOOD RES INT. 01/2011; 44(9):2751-2756.
  • Maria I. Tsiraki, Ioannis N. Savvaidis
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we compared the effect of basil essential oil (EO) and various packaging conditions on “Anthotyros,” a Greek whey cheese. This cheese was stored at 4 °C under aerobic (A), vacuum (V), and modified atmosphere (M, 40%/60%; CO2/N2,) conditions, without or with (AB, VB, and VM) basil EO added to the cheese samples to a final concentration of 0.4% (v/w). The quality characteristics and the shelf life of both untreated and basil EO-treated cheese were assessed using microbiological, physicochemical, and sensory parameters. Microbiological results revealed that either modified atmosphere/vacuum packaging (MAP/VP) singly or in combination with basil EO delayed microbial growth as compared to the control (A) samples. The sensory and microbiological data showed that the combined use of MAP and VP with added basil EO extended the shelf life of fresh Anthotyros (4 °C) by approximately 10–12 days (treatment MB) and 6 days (treatment VB) as compared to aerobic packaging (A). Under these treatments, whey cheese samples maintained good sensory characteristics. This study has shown that the combined use of either VP or MAP, and basil EO, can extend the shelf life of whey cheese and maintain the freshness and the sensorial characteristics of the product.
    Food and Bioprocess Technology 01/2011; · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study evaluated the effect of oregano essential oil (EO) on fresh salted, packaged (45%CO(2)/5%O(2)/50%N(2)) rainbow trout fillets and stored for a period of 21 d at 4 °C. Treatments included the following: M1 (control without added EO), M2 (EO 0.2%, v/w), and M3 (0.4%, v/w). Populations of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), H(2)S-producing bacteria (including Shewanella putrefaciens), Enterobacteriaceae, and Pseudomonas spp. reached higher final numbers in control (M1) than for M2 and M3 samples. Under treatments M2 and M3, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVBN) and trimethylamine nitrogen (TMAN) values were lower than for M1 samples, whereas lipid oxidation, as judged by determination of thiobarbituric acid values (TBA), did not occur during the refrigerated storage period. Interestingly, treatment M2 resulted in a shelf-life extension of 7 to 8 d for the fresh trout fillets, whereas treatment M3 proved unsuitable (due to strong odor) for trout fillet preservation, as determined by sensory evaluation. PRACTICAL APPLICATION: The use of an essential oil such as oregano oil in fresh fish preservation may be considered an alternative "natural" additive, enhancing the sensory characteristics and extending the shelf life of the product.
    Journal of Food Science 09/2010; 75(7):M406-11. · 1.78 Impact Factor
  • V Giatrakou, A Ntzimani, I N Savvaidis
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    ABSTRACT: In the present study, natural antimicrobials chitosan and thyme, and their combination, were evaluated for their effect on the shelf life of a ready-to-cook (RTC) chicken-pepper kebab (skewer) stored under modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) conditions at 4 +/- 0.5 degrees C for 14 days. The following treatments were examined: control samples stored under aerobic packaging (A), samples stored under MAP (M), samples treated with 1.5% chitosan (vol/wt) and stored under MAP (M-CH), samples treated with 0.2% thyme essential oil (vol/wt) (M-T), and samples treated with 1.5% chitosan (vol/wt) and 0.2% thyme essential oil (vol/wt) and stored under MAP (M-CH-T). Treatment M-CH-T significantly affected aerobic plate counts and counts of lactic acid bacteria, Pseudomonas spp., Brochothrix thermosphacta, Enterobacteriaceae, and yeasts and molds during the entire storage period. Similarly, lipid oxidation of the RTC product was retarded (M-CH-T treatment) during storage, whereas redness was maintained in M-T, M-CH, and M-CH-T samples. Based primarily on sensory data (taste attribute), M-CH and M-T treatments extended RTC product shelf life by 6 days, whereas M-CH-T treatment resulted in a product with a shelf life of 14 days that maintained acceptable sensory characteristics (shelf life of the control was 6 days).
    Journal of food protection 04/2010; 73(4):663-9. · 1.83 Impact Factor
  • V Giatrakou, A Ntzimani, I N Savvaidis
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    ABSTRACT: The present study examined the effect of natural antimicrobials: chitosan, thyme and their combination, on the shelf-life of a Ready to Cook (RTC) chicken-pepper kebab (skewer) stored under aerobic conditions at 4 +/- 0.5 degrees C for a period of 12 days. Treatments examined in the present study were the following: A (control samples, untreated), A-CH (chitosan; 1.5% v/w), A-T (thyme essential oil; 0.2% v/w) and A-CH-T (chitosan; 1.5% v/w and thyme essential oil; 0.2% v/w). The shelf-life of the samples was determined using both microbiological and sensory analyses. Among the microorganisms examined, pseudomonads were the most resistant group towards the combined application of chitosan and thyme oil (ca. 1.5 log cycle reduction) while Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Brochothrix thermosphacta and Enterobacteriaceae were the most sensitive to the combined action of these two agents (2-3 log cycle reduction). Yeasts-moulds were also part of the natural microbial association of the RTC product, with A-CH-T treatment suppressing effectively their growth during the entire period of storage. Treatments A-CH and A-CH-T resulted in lower pH values as compared to the control (A) samples. Of the treatments examined in the present study, A-CH-T, gave a "spicy", desirable and pleasant (organoleptically acceptable) RTC product. Based primarily on sensory data (taste attribute) A-CH, A-T and A-CH-T treatments extended the product's shelf-life by ca. 4 and 6 days, respectively, as compared to the control sample.
    Food Microbiology 02/2010; 27(1):132-6. · 3.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study evaluated the effect of salt, oregano essential oil (EO) and packaging on fresh rainbow trout fillets during storage at 4 degrees C. Treatments included the following: A1 (control samples, unsalted: air packaged), A2 (salted: air packaged), VP1 (salted, vacuum packaged), VP2 (salted, vacuum packaged with added oregano EO 0.2% v/wt), and VP3 salted, vacuum packaged with added oregano EO 0.4% v/wt). Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) (to a greater extent), followed by H(2)S-producing bacteria (including Shewanella putrefaciens), Pseudomonas spp. and Enterobacteriaceae reached higher populations in A1, A2 (as compared to VP1, VP2 and VP3) trout samples. Treatments VP1, VP2 and VP3 produced significantly lower (P < 0.05) total volatile basic nitrogen (TVBN) and trimethylamine nitrogen (TMAN) values as compared to the A1 and A2 samples after day 6 and until end of storage period. Changes in thiobarbituric acid values (TBA) values for A1, A2, VP1, VP2 and VP3 samples were variable, indicative of no specific trend in trout samples, irrespective of packaging in the absence and/or presence of salt and oregano EO. As determined by sensory analysis (overall acceptability attribute) the observed shelf-life of trout fillets was longest for VP2 (16-17 days) followed by VP1 (14 days), A2 (8 days) and control (A1) samples (5 days). The presence of salt and oregano oil (0.2%) in cooked VP1 trout samples produced a distinct but sensorially acceptable pleasant odor, well received by the panellists, in contrast to the combined effect of salt and oregano oil at the higher concentrations (0.4% v/wt) used. Addition of salt (treatment VP1) extended the product's shelf-life by 9 days, whereas the combination of salt, oregano EO (0.2% v/wt) under VP conditions (treatment VP2) resulted in a significant shelf-life extension of trout fillets (11-12 days) according to sensory data, as compared to the control sample, kept under aerobic conditions.
    Food Microbiology 02/2010; 27(1):115-21. · 3.41 Impact Factor
  • Athina G. Ntzimani, Vasiliki I. Giatrakou, Ioannis N. Savvaidis
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    ABSTRACT: The present study examined the effect of natural antimicrobials: Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), lysozyme, rosemary and oregano oil and their combinations, on the shelf-life of semi cooked coated chicken fillets stored under vacuum packaging (VP), at 4 ± 0.5 °C for a period of 18 days. The treatments of semi cooked coated chicken fillets examined in the present study were the following: Air-packaged (A, control samples), vacuum-packaged (VP), VP with EDTA–lysozyme solution 1.50% w/w, (VP + EL), VP with rosemary oil 0.20% v/w, (VP + R), VP with oregano oil 0.20% v/w, (VP + O), VP with EDTA–lysozyme solution and rosemary oil (VP + EL + R) and finally VP with EDTA–lysozyme and oregano oil (VP + EL + O). The shelf-life of the samples was determined using both microbiological and sensory analyses. Among the antimicrobial combinations examined in the present study, the treatments VP + EL + R and VP + EL + O were the most effective against the growth of Gram-negative, Gram-positive bacteria, and to a lesser extent on yeasts. Based on both microbiological (TVC data) and sensory (taste attribute) analyses, treatments: VP and VP + O gave a shelf life extension of 6 days, whereas treatments VP + EL + R and VP + EL + O produced a shelf-life extension of 7–8 days, as compared to the control samples.Industrial RelevanceThe present research has highlighted the use of natural antimicrobial treatment combinations, including: EDTA, lysozyme, rosemary and oregano oil and their combinations, in the extension of shelf-life of semi cooked coated chicken fillets stored under vacuum packaging at 4 °C for a period of 18 days. Establishing, the determination of the shelf-life of fresh poultry and products represents a challenge for food companies as poultry meat has a short shelf-life, which causes substantial practical problems for its distribution. Therefore, knowledge of natural preservatives, that can be used as alternatives to chemical additives, that could extend the products' shelf life can have an important economic feedback by reducing losses attributed to spoilage and by allowing the products to reach distant and new markets. This study has shown that combinations of natural antimicrobials can extend the shelf-life of the product.
    Innovative Food Science & Emerging Technologies. 01/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: The present study evaluated the combined effect of Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP) using two different gas mixtures (40% CO2/50% N2/10% O2; treatment M1, 60% CO2/30% N2/10% O2, treatment M2), and thyme oil (0.2% v/w, T) used as a natural preservative, on the quality and shelf life extension of fresh filleted sea bass, product of organic aquaculture, during refrigerated storage (4 +/- 0.5 degrees C), for a period of 21 days. Aerobically packaged sea bass fillets (A) were used as control samples. The dominant bacteria in the microflora of sea bass fillets, irrespective of treatment, were the pseudomonads and the H2S-producing bacteria while lactic acid bacteria were also part of the dominant microflora. Total viable counts for fresh sea bass fillets stored aerobically exceeded 7 log CFU/g after 7 days, while treatments A+T, M1, M2 and M2+T reached the same value on days 9, 10, 12 and 19, respectively. Among the chemical indices determined, TBA values were within the good quality limits (2-4 mg MDA/kg), during the sensory shelf lives of sea bass samples, irrespective of treatment. TVB-N proved to be a suitable index for the spoilage of sea bass fillets stored at 4 degrees C. Samples A and A+T, M1, M2, M2+T exceeded the proposed upper TVB-N acceptability limit (10 mg N/100 g) on days 6, 8, 9, 13 and 17 of storage respectively. TMA-N values of the samples A, A+T and M1, M2, M2+T exceeded the proposed limit (4 mg N/100 g) on days 6, 9, 9-10, 13 and 19 of storage, respectively, and correlated well with the microbiological data, indicating that along with TVB-N, TMA-N may serve as a useful index for sea bass fillets spoilage. As regards sensory evaluation, the presence of thyme oil proved to improve the sensory quality of sea bass fillets when used in combination with MAP2, providing a shelf life of 17 days as compared to 6 days of the control samples.
    Food Microbiology 09/2009; 26(5):475-82. · 3.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study evaluated the use of vacuum packaging (alone) or with addition of oregano essential oil (EO), as an antimicrobial treatment for shelf-life extension of fresh Mediterranean octopus stored under refrigeration for a period of 23 days. Four different treatments were tested: A, control sample; under aerobic storage in the absence of oregano essential oil; VP, under vacuum packaging in the absence of oregano essential oil; and VO1, VO2, treated samples with oregano essential oil 0.2 and 0.4% (v/w), respectively, under VP. Of all the microorganisms enumerated, Pseudomonas spp., H2S-producing bacteria and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were the groups that prevailed in octopus samples, irrespective of antimicrobial treatment. With regard to the chemical freshness indices determined, thiobarbituric acid (TBA) values were low in all octopus samples, as could have been expected from the low fat content of the product. Both trimethylamine nitrogen (TMA-N) and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) values of oregano treated under VP octopus samples were significantly lower compared to control samples during the entire refrigerated storage period. Based primarily on sensory evaluation (odor), the use of VP, VO1 and VO2 extended the shelf-life of fresh Mediterranean octopus by ca. 3, 11 and 20 days, respectively.
    Food Microbiology 05/2009; 26(2):166-72. · 3.41 Impact Factor
  • T. Economou, N. Pournis, A. Ntzimani, I.N. Savvaidis
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of nisin and EDTA treatments on the shelf-life of fresh chicken meat stored under modified atmosphere packaging at 4 °C was evaluated. Chicken meat was subjected to the following antimicrobial treatment combinations: Nisin–EDTA treatments (added post-production to the chicken samples) included: N1 (no nisin–EDTA added; control sample), N2 (500 IU/g; no EDTA added), N3 (1500 IU/g; no EDTA added), N4 (500 IU/g-10 mM EDTA), N5 (1500 IU/g-10 EDTA), N6 (500 IU/g-50 mM EDTA), N7 (1500 IU/g-50 EDTA), N8 (10 mM EDTA; no nisin added), and N9 (50 mM EDTA; no nisin added). N3, N4, N5, N6 and N7 affected populations of mesophilic bacteria, Pseudomonas sp., Brochothrix thermosphacta, lactic acid bacteria, and Enterobacteriaceae. The antimicrobial combination treatments N5, N6 and N7 had a significant effect on the formation of volatile amines, trimethylamine nitrogen (TMA-N) and total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) in chicken meat. The use of MAP in combination with nisin–EDTA antimicrobial treatments resulted in an organoleptic extension of refrigerated, fresh chicken meat by approximately 1–2 days (N2), 3–4 days (N3 and N4), 7–8 days (N5), 9–10 (N7) and by 13–14 days (N6). Chicken was better preserved under treatments N6 and N7, maintaining acceptable odour attributes even up to 24 and 20 days of storage, respectively.
    Food Chemistry. 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: The present study evaluated the effect of thyme essential oil and packaging on fresh Mediterranean swordfish fillets during storage at 4 °C. Treatments in the present study included the following: air (A), modified atmosphere packaging (M), air with thyme oil (AT) and MAP with thyme oil (MT). Of the physicochemical parameters examined, TBA values for A and M swordfish samples were variable, indicative of no specific oxidative rancidity trend, whereas MT treatment inhibited lipid oxidation in swordfish samples during storage. On the basis of microbiological and sensory data, TMA-N and TVB-N limit values of acceptability for Mediterranean swordfish, of ca. 3.72 and 24.5 mg N/100 g, for the initiation of fresh Mediterranean swordfish spoilage, may be proposed. Of the treatments used in the present study, MT and M were the most effective for the inhibition of pseudomonads and H2S-producing bacteria in swordfish. Lactic acid bacteria and Enterobacteriaceae (to a lesser extent) were also found to be part of the natural microbial flora of swordfish, irrespective of packaging treatment. Based primarily on sensory data, the shelf-lives of fresh refrigerated Mediterranean swordfish were 8 and 13 days under aerobic and MAP conditions, respectively. Addition of 0.1% thyme essential oil extended the product’s shelf-life under aerobic conditions by 5 days, whereas the combination of MAP and thyme oil resulted in a significant shelf-life extension of the swordfish fillets, i.e. by approximately 7½ days, according to sensory data, as compared to the control sample.
    Food Chemistry. 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Fresh Souvlaki-type lamb meat was packaged under vacuum (VP) and modified atmospheres (MAs) and stored under refrigeration (4°C) for a period of 13 days. The following gas mixtures were used: M1: 30%/70% (CO2/N2) and M2: 70%/30% (CO2/N2). Identical samples were aerobically-packaged and used as control samples. Quality evaluation of product stored under the above packaging conditions was conducted using physicochemical and microbiological analyses. Of the chemical parameters determined, pH values of product showed no significant differences for all packaging treatments as a function of storage time. Lipid oxidation of lamb meat was enhanced by aerobic storage and gas mixture M1, whereas VP and gas mixture M2 controlled lipid oxidation to a greater extent. Souvlaki colour stability (as determined by a∗, b∗ and L∗ values) was not negatively affected by either VP or MA conditions during the 13 days of storage. Of the two MAs and VP used, gas mixture M2 and VP were the most effective treatments for the inhibition of total viable counts (TVC), Pseudomonas spp., yeasts and Brochothrix thermosphacta in Souvlaki meat. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and Enterobacteriaceae were also found in the microbial flora of Souvlaki and increased during storage under all packaging conditions used. Based on microbiological analysis data and on the proposed a∗ values, the use of VP and MAP (M2: 70%CO2/30N2) extended the shelf-life of “Souvlaki” meat stored at 4°C by approximately 4–5 days compared to aerobic packaging.
    Food Chemistry - FOOD CHEM. 01/2009; 113(1):36-42.

Publication Stats

879 Citations
131.16 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1998–2014
    • University of Ioannina
      • • Department of Chemistry
      • • School of Medicine
      Ioánnina, Ipeiros, Greece
  • 2010
    • Nicosia General Hospital
      Lefkoşa, Lefkosia, Cyprus
  • 2008–2009
    • Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
      • Faculty of Veterinary Medicine
      Thessaloníki, Kentriki Makedonia, Greece
  • 1990
    • King's College London
      • Department of Chemistry
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom