Johan Olsson

Uppsala University, Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden

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Publications (12)42.69 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the present study, the use of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC–MS)-based metabonomics to characterize blood serum in an intervention study of patients suffering from the common gastrointestinal disorder irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) was investigated. The patients included in the study consumed an acidified milk product with (n = 30) or without probiotics (n = 31) (Lactobacillus paracasei F19, Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 and Bifidobacterium lactis BB-12) for an 8-week period, and blood serum samples were collected before and after the intervention. Acidified milk is commonly used as a delivering vector for probiotics in commercial consumer settings. The serum samples were extracted and derivatized using N-Methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA), and GC–MS analysis was carried out. Multivariate data analysis including principal component analysis (PCA), orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), and S-plot was applied on the obtained GC–MS data, which revealed higher serum lactate, glutamine, proline creatinine/creatine, and aspartic acid levels and lower serum glucose levels after the intervention period for both treatment groups. Consequently, the present study indicated an effect of acidified milk consumption on the plasma metabolite profile, which was independent of a concomitant intake of probiotics. In addition, the present study demonstrates that GC–MS is a useful analytical technique for metabonomics studies of blood serum.
    European Food Research and Technology 12/2011; 233(6). · 1.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Whole grain rye products have previously been shown to increase feelings of satiety for up to 8h after intake under standardized conditions. This study was set out to investigate the sustainability of the satiating effect after regular consumption of breakfast meals with whole grain rye porridge or refined wheat bread. The study was randomized, cross-over and double-blind. Healthy subjects (n=24) were randomly assigned to daily consumption of iso-caloric standardized breakfast meals with whole grain rye porridge or refined wheat bread for two 3-wk phases, separated by a wash out of 3-4weeks. Each intervention phase had 3 scheduled visit days (days 1, 8 and 22) when appetite ratings (hunger, satiety and desire to eat) were registered for 24h at standardized conditions. Orocecal transit time (salicylazosulfapyridine/sulfapyridine method) and breath hydrogen as an indicator of colonic fermentation were measured at day 8 of each 3-wk phase in a subgroup (n=16). To investigate effects of breakfast on free-living food intake, 3-day weighed food diaries were self-registered during both intervention phases. Whole grain rye porridge breakfast resulted in higher ratings of satiety and lower hunger and desire to eat during 4h post consumption compared to refined wheat bread breakfast (p<0.001). This effect was sustained throughout the 3-wk study phases. Unlike previous studies, the effects did not persist into the afternoon (4-8h). The orocecal transit times after consumption of both breakfasts were similar and in the range of 5-6h. The rye porridge resulted in high levels of breath hydrogen 4-8h after intake, showing extensive colonic fermentation. This was however not related to any changes in appetite during this time-period. There were no significant differences in self-reported macronutrient- and energy intake between diets. This study shows that the satiating effect of rye persists after repeated daily consumption for up to three weeks. Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01117363.
    Physiology & Behavior 10/2011; 105(3):877-84. · 3.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The maintenance of an obtained lower weight level is often found to be difficult. The aim of this study was to determine weight maintenance after an initial weight loss by consumption of a meal replacement with a vegetable-oil emulsion associated with prolonged satiety. After a 6-week weight loss period with very low calorie diet (VLCD), subjects with >5% body weight (BW) loss were randomized to a 12-week weight maintenance follow-up period, comparing a partial meal replacement diet containing a vegetable-oil emulsion (test) or dairy fat (control). Anthropometric data and safety variables were collected at baseline and after 4, 8 and 12 weeks. A significant weight loss was observed during the 12-week weight maintenance diet in the test and control group, respectively; 1.0 ± 2.1 kg (p < 0.05) versus 1.3 ± 2.1 kg (p < 0.05) with no significant difference between the groups. Body fat mass (BFM) decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in the test group (--1.7%) compared to the control group (--0.8%). Addition of a vegetable-oil emulsion to a meal replacement weight maintenance program after an initial weight loss using VLCD was associated with decreased BFM by 0.9% without any change in BW between the two groups.
    European Journal of Nutrition 06/2011; 50(4):235-42. · 3.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of probiotics on IBS symptoms has been mixed, but remains an intriguing treatment option with appeal to the patient. Patients fulfilling the Rome II criteria were randomized double-blind to a daily intake of 500 ml of fermented milk containing at least 5 × 10(7) CFU/ml of Lactobacillus paracasei ssp paracasei F19, Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 or an equal volume of acidified milk for 8 weeks. Symptoms were assessed at baseline and weekly using a disease-specific validated symptom rating scale (IBS-SSI). The predefined primary outcome measure was patient reported adequate symptom relief. Adherence to study protocol were assessed by performing stool samples at the of the treatment period. Eight-one patients were screened. Sixty-four patients were randomized; 18 patients did not complete the study due to protocol violations or withdrew due to lack of effect. Fifty-two patients (13 males) completed the study as per protocol; mean age was 51.3 years (range 29-67). The proportion of patients reporting adequate symptom relief increased in both patient groups, but there was not any statistical difference between the groups. IBS-SSI scores did not differ statistically between the groups at the end of the treatment period, but improved during the study period in both groups. During this 8-week trial gastrointestinal symptoms improved. However, there was no difference between treatment with fermented milk containing probiotics or acidified milk. The effect of probiotics on IBS symptoms remains uncertain and further studies are warranted.
    Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 03/2011; 46(6):663-72. · 2.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The structure of whole grain cereals is maintained to varying degrees during processing and preparation of foods. Food structure can influence metabolism, including perceived hunger and satiety. A diet that enhances satiety per calorie may help to prevent excessive calorie intake. The objective of this work was to compare subjective appetite ratings after consumption of intact and milled rye kernels. Two studies were performed using a randomized, cross-over design. Ratings for appetite (hunger, satiety and desire to eat) were registered during an 8-h period after consumption of whole and milled rye kernels prepared as breads (study 1, n = 24) and porridges (study 2, n = 20). Sifted wheat bread was used as reference in both study parts and the products were eaten in iso-caloric portions with standardized additional breakfast foods. Breads and porridges were analyzed to determine whether structure (whole vs. milled kernels) effected dietary fibre content and composition after preparation of the products. Statistical evaluation of the appetite ratings after intake of the different breakfasts was done by paired t-tests for morning and afternoon ratings separately, with subjects as random effect and type of breakfast and time points as fixed effects. All rye breakfasts resulted in higher satiety ratings in the morning and afternoon compared with the iso-caloric reference breakfast with sifted wheat bread. Rye bread with milled or whole kernels affected appetite equally, so no effect of structure was observed. In contrast, after consumption of the rye kernel breakfast, satiety was increased and hunger suppressed in the afternoon compared with the milled rye kernel porridge breakfast. This effect could be related to structural differences alone, because the products were equal in nutritional content including dietary fibre content and composition. The study demonstrates that small changes in diet composition such as cereal grain structure have the potential to effect feelings of hunger and satiety. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01042418.
    Nutrition Journal 01/2011; 10:31. · 2.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effects of a probiotic acidified milk product on the blood serum metabolite profile of patients suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) compared to a non-probiotic acidified milk product was investigated using (1)H NMR metabonomics. For eight weeks, IBS patients consumed 0.4 L per day of a probiotic fermented milk product or non-probiotic acidified milk. Both diets resulted in elevated levels of blood serum L-lactate and 3-hydroxybutyrate. Our results showed identical effects of acidified milk consumption independent of probiotic addition. A similar result was previously obtained in a questionnaire-based evaluation of symptom relief. A specific probiotic effect is thus absent both in the patient subjective symptom evaluations and at the blood serum metabolite level. However, there was no correspondence between symptom relief and metabolite response on the patient level.
    Nutrients 11/2010; 2(11):1141-55. · 3.15 Impact Factor
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    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics 03/2010; 31(8):923 - 924. · 4.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effects of probiotic bacteria in IBS remain controversial. To study the effects of a probiotic product on IBS symptoms. We randomized 74 IBS patients to receive 8 weeks of daily treatment with 400 mL milk fermented with the yoghurt bacteria and containing Lactobacillus paracasei, ssp. paracasei F19, Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (Cultura; active) or acidified milk without these bacteria (control). The primary endpoint was the proportion of subjects reporting adequate relief of their IBS symptoms at least 50% of the weeks. IBS symptom severity, psychological symptoms and quality of life were assessed. The proportion of responders was 38% (14/37 patients) in the active group and 27% (10/37 patients) in the control group (P = 0.3). IBS symptom severity improved significantly in both groups during the treatment period. This change was greater in the active group during the first 2 weeks, but thereafter, no significant group differences were seen. We could not detect a clearly positive effect of fermented milk containing three probiotic bacteria on GI symptoms in IBS patients compared with the control treatment. However, a trend towards a more favourable effect during the first weeks was seen in the active group.
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics 10/2009; 31(2):218-27. · 4.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Given the growing prevalence of overweight and related health consequences, there is increased interest in the search for novel dietary strategies for weight control. A food ingredient, an emulsion based on palm and oat oil (Fabuless, previously known as Olibra), has been associated with short-term reductions of food intake, induction of satiety, alternation in the satiety hormones, as well as long-term effects on weight control. The mechanism by which it can exert these effects is so far unclear, though it has been suggested that the "ileal break" may play a role in increasing gastrointestinal transit time. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of this stable fat emulsion on orocecal transit time in healthy men. In a controlled, double-blind, cross-over-designed study, 15 healthy men (aged 20-59 years, body mass index (BMI) 22-28), randomly allocated to two treatments, consumed the stable fat emulsion or a milk fat in yoghurt during two days of investigation, with an interval of 1 week. Orocecal transit time was determined by following blood sulfapyridine levels, which is a metabolite of salazopyrine in the colon. A statistically significant delay in the appearance of sulfapyridine in serum was obtained after active treatment versus control treatment, corresponding to a 45-min longer orocecal transit time due to fat emulsion consumption. This study provides the first evidence to suggest that this stable fat emulsion may affect the ileal brake mechanism by slowing down the gastrointestinal transit time, which might explain the weight control and appetite suppression previously observed in association with this emulsion.
    Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 09/2009; 44(10):1186-90. · 2.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several studies report that dietary fibre from different sources promotes the feeling of satiety and suppresses hunger. However, results for cereal fibre from rye are essentially lacking. The aim of the present study was to investigate subjective appetite during 8 h after intake of iso-caloric rye bread breakfasts varying in rye dietary fibre composition and content. The study was divided into two parts. The first part (n = 16) compared the satiating effect of iso-caloric bread breakfasts including different milling fractions of rye (bran, intermediate fraction (B4) and sifted flour). The second part (n = 16) investigated the dose-response effect of rye bran and intermediate rye fraction, each providing 5 or 8 g of dietary fibre per iso-caloric bread breakfast. Both study parts used a wheat bread breakfast as reference and a randomised, within-subject comparison design. Appetite (hunger, satiety and desire to eat) was rated regularly from just before breakfast at 08:00 until 16:00. Amount, type and timing of food and drink intake were standardised during the study period. The Milling fractions study showed that each of the rye breakfasts resulted in a suppressed appetite during the time period before lunch (08:3012:00) compared with the wheat reference bread breakfast. At a comparison between the rye bread breakfasts the one with rye bran induced the strongest effect on satiety. In the afternoon the effect from all three rye bread breakfasts could still be seen as a decreased hunger and desire to eat compared to the wheat reference bread breakfast.In the Dose-response study both levels of rye bran and the lower level of intermediate rye fraction resulted in an increased satiety before lunch compared with the wheat reference bread breakfast. Neither the variation in composition between the milling fractions nor the different doses resulted in significant differences in any of the appetite ratings when compared with one another. The results show that rye bread can be used to decrease hunger feelings both before and after lunch when included in a breakfast meal. Rye bran induces a stronger effect on satiety than the other two rye fractions used when served in iso-caloric portions. Trial registration number NCT00876785.
    Nutrition Journal 09/2009; 8:39. · 2.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies show that dietary fibre-rich foods with low energy density have a stronger effect on satiety per calorie compared to more energy dense foods. To investigate subjective appetite and voluntary energy intake (24 h) after consumption of rye porridge breakfast and pasta lunch made from whole grain compared to iso-energetic reference meals made from refined cereals: wheat bread breakfast and wheat pasta lunch. In all, 22 healthy subjects, 14 females and 8 males, aged 21-64 years, BMI ranging from 18.7 to 27.5 kg/m(2), participated. A randomised, crossover design was used. Appetite was rated by visual analogue scales (VAS) regularly from just before breakfast (08:00) until bedtime. An ad libitum dinner was served at 16:00. After leaving the clinic and in the morning day 2, subjects recorded foods consumed. Whole grain rye porridge gave a significantly prolonged satiety, lowered hunger and desire to eat (p<0.05 in most point estimates) up to 8 h after consumption compared to the refined wheat bread. The two pasta lunch meals did not vary in their effects on appetite ratings. There was no significant effect on ad libitum energy intake at 16:00 or self-reported energy and macronutrient intake in the evening and breakfast meal on day 2. Whole grain rye porridge at breakfast has prolonged satiating properties up to 8 h after consumption compared to refined wheat bread, but did not diminish subsequent food intake.
    Food & Nutrition Research 07/2008; 52.
  • Gastroenterology 01/2008; 134(4). · 12.82 Impact Factor