Debra L Friedman

Vanderbilt University, Нашвилл, Michigan, United States

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Publications (114)686.47 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A phase 3 trial assessing response-based therapy in intermediate-risk Hodgkin lymphoma mandated real-time central review of involved field radiation therapy (IFRT) and imaging records by a centralized review center to maximize protocol compliance. We report the impact of centralized radiation therapy review on protocol compliance. Review of simulation films, port films, and dosimetry records was required before and after treatment. Records were reviewed by study-affiliated or review center-affiliated radiation oncologists. A deviation of 6% to 10% from protocol-specified dose was scored as "minor"; a deviation of >10% was "major." A volume deviation was scored as "minor" if margins were less than specified or "major" if fields transected disease-bearing areas. Interventional review and final compliance review scores were assigned to each radiation therapy case and compared. Of 1712 patients enrolled, 1173 underwent IFRT at 256 institutions in 7 countries. An interventional review was performed in 88% of patients and a final review in 98%. Overall, minor and major deviations were found in 12% and 6% of patients, respectively. Among the cases for which ≥1 pre-IFRT modification was requested by the Quality Assurance Review Center and subsequently made by the treating institution, 100% were made compliant on final review. By contrast, among the cases for which ≥1 modification was requested but not made by the treating institution, 10% were deemed compliant on final review. In a large trial with complex treatment pathways and heterogeneous radiation therapy fields, central review was performed in a large percentage of cases before IFRT and identified frequent potential deviations in a timely manner. When suggested modifications were performed by the institutions, deviations were almost eliminated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2014.11.034 · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the feasibility of a legacy-making intervention in children with cancer and the preliminary effects on outcomes related to quality of life. Children (N = 28) ages 7-17 years completed a baseline QOL questionnaire (PedsQL) at T1. After baseline, the intervention group (n = 15) completed a randomized intervention that guided children to answer questions about legacy-making and create a digital story about themselves. A final copy of the digital story was provided to the families. A control group (n = 13) received customary care. Children repeated the questionnaire at T2. Parents (N = 22) of children who completed the intervention completed follow-up survey questions regarding intervention effects. Feasibility was strong (78% participation; 1 attrition). While differences between the groups in physical, emotional, social, or school functioning change was not statistically significant, the intervention group showed slightly better emotional and school functioning compared to controls. Parents reported that their child's digital story provided emotional comfort to them (n = 11, 46%), facilitated communication between parents and children (n = 9, 38%), and was a coping strategy for them (n = 4, 17%). Parents reported that the intervention helped children express their feelings (n = 19, 79%), cope (n = 6, 27%), and feel better emotionally (n = 5, 23%). Our intervention is feasible for children with cancer, is developmentally appropriate for children 7-17 years of age, and demonstrates promise to improve quality of life outcomes for children with cancer and their parents. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2014;9999:1-8 © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 01/2015; 62(4). DOI:10.1002/pbc.25337 · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The study was designed to determine whether response-based therapy improves outcomes in intermediate-risk Hodgkin lymphoma. We examined patterns of first relapse in the study. From September 2002 to July 2010, 1712 patients <22 years old with stage I-IIA with bulk, I-IIAE, I-IIB, and IIIA-IVA with or without doxorubicin, bleomycin, vincristine, etoposide, prednisone, and cyclophosphamide were enrolled. Patients were categorized as rapid (RER) or slow early responders (SER) after 2 cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vincristine, etoposide, prednisone, and cyclophosphamide (ABVE-PC). The SER patients were randomized to 2 additional ABVE-PC cycles or augmented chemotherapy with 21 Gy involved field radiation therapy (IFRT). RER patients were stipulated to undergo 2 additional ABVE-PC cycles and were then randomized to 21 Gy IFRT or no further treatment if complete response (CR) was achieved. RER without CR patients were non-randomly assigned to 21 Gy IFRT. Relapses were characterized without respect to site (initial, new, or both; and initial bulk or initial nonbulk), and involved field radiation therapy field (in-field, out-of-field, or both). Patients were grouped by treatment assignment (SER; RER/no CR; RER/CR/IFRT; and RER/CR/no IFRT). Summary statistics were reported. At 4-year median follow-up, 244 patients had experienced relapse, 198 of whom were fully evaluable for review. Those who progressed during treatment (n=30) or lacked relapse imaging (n=16) were excluded. The median time to relapse was 12.8 months. Of the 198 evaluable patients, 30% were RER/no CR, 26% were SER, 26% were RER/CR/no IFRT, 16% were RER/CR/IFRT, and 2% remained uncategorized. The 74% and 75% relapses involved initially bulky and nonbulky sites, respectively. First relapses rarely occurred at exclusively new or out-of-field sites. By contrast, relapses usually occurred at nodal sites of initial bulky and nonbulky disease. Although response-based therapy has helped define treatment for selected RER patients, it has not improved outcome for SER patients or facilitated refinement of IFRT volumes or doses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 12/2014; 84(3). DOI:10.1016/j.ijrobp.2014.10.042 · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provide screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for common physical and psychosocial consequences of cancer and cancer treatment. This portion of the guidelines describes recommendations regarding screening for the effects of cancer and its treatment. The panel created a sample screening tool, specifically for use in combination with the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship, to guide providers to topics that require more in-depth assessment. Effective screening and assessment can help providers deliver necessary and comprehensive survivorship care.
    Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN 11/2014; 12(11):1526-31. · 4.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background There has been little improvement in the survival of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients aged 15 to 39 years relative to other age groups, raising the question of whether such patients receive appropriate initial treatment. Methods We examined receipt of initial cancer treatment for a population-based sample of 504 AYAs diagnosed in 20072008 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), Hodgkin's or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, germ cell cancer, or sarcoma. Registry data, patient surveys, and detailed medical record reviews were used to evaluate the association of patient demographic, socioeconomic, and health care setting characteristics with receipt of appropriate initial treatment, which was defined by clinical specialists in AYA oncology based on adult guidelines and published literature available before 2009 and analyzed with multivariable logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Approximately 75% of AYA cancer patients in our sample received appropriate treatment, 68% after excluding stage I male germ cell patients who all received appropriate treatment. After this exclusion, appropriate treatment ranged from 79% of sarcoma patients to 56% of ALL patients. Cancer type (P < .01) and clinical trial participation (P =.04) were statistically significantly associated with appropriate treatment in multivariable analyses. Patients enrolled in clinical trials were more likely to receive appropriate therapy relative to those not enrolled (78% vs 67%, adjusted odds ratio = 2.6, 95% confidence interval = 1.1 to 6.4). Conclusions Except for those with early stage male germ cell tumors, approximately 30% (or 3 in 10) AYA cancer patients did not receive appropriate therapy. Further investigation is required to understand the reasons for this potential shortfall in care delivery.
    JNCI Journal of the National Cancer Institute 11/2014; 106(11). DOI:10.1093/jnci/dju300 · 15.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Children's Oncology Group study AHOD0031, a randomized phase III study, was designed to evaluate the role of early chemotherapy response in tailoring subsequent therapy in pediatric intermediate-risk Hodgkin lymphoma. To avoid treatment-associated risks that compromise long-term health and to maintain high cure rates, dose-intensive chemotherapy with limited cumulative doses was used.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 10/2014; 32(32). DOI:10.1200/JCO.2013.52.5410 · 17.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Healthy lifestyle habits have been associated with improved health outcomes and quality of life and, for some cancers, a reduced risk of recurrence and death. The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship therefore recommend that cancer survivors be encouraged to achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle, including attention to weight management, physical activity, and dietary habits. This section of the NCCN Guidelines focuses on recommendations regarding nutrition, weight management, and supplement use in survivors. Weight management recommendations are based on the survivor's body mass index and include discussions of nutritional, weight management, and physical activity principles, with referral to community resources, dietitians, and/or weight management programs as needed.
    Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN 10/2014; 12(10):1396-406. · 4.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Pediatric oncology patients are at increased risk for blood stream infections (BSI). Risk in the absence of severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count [ANC] ≥500/µl) is not well defined.ProcedureIn a retrospective cohort of febrile (temperature ≥38.0° for >1 hr or ≥38.3°) pediatric oncology patients with ANC ≥500/µl, a diagnostic prediction model for BSI was constructed using logistic regression modeling and the following candidate predictors: age, ANC, absolute monocyte count, body temperature, inpatient/outpatient presentation, sex, central venous catheter type, hypotension, chills, cancer diagnosis, stem cell transplant, upper respiratory symptoms, and exposure to cytarabine, anti-thymocyte globulin, or anti-GD2 antibody. The model was internally validated with bootstrapping methods.ResultsAmong 932 febrile episodes in 463 patients, we identified 91 cases of BSI. Independently significant predictors for BSI were higher body temperature (Odds ratio [OR] 2.36 P < 0.001), tunneled external catheter (OR 13.79 P < 0.001), peripherally inserted central catheter (OR 3.95 P = 0.005), elevated ANC (OR 1.19 P = 0.024), chills (OR 2.09 P = 0.031), and hypotension (OR 3.08 P = 0.004). Acute lymphoblastic leukemia diagnosis (OR 0.34 P = 0.026), increased age (OR 0.70 P = 0.049), and drug exposure (OR 0.08 P < 0.001) were associated with decreased risk for BSI. The risk prediction model had a C-index of 0.898; after bootstrapping adjustment for optimism, corrected C-index 0.885.Conclusions We developed a diagnostic prediction model for BSI in febrile pediatric oncology patients without severe neutropenia. External validation is warranted before use in clinical practice. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2014;9999:1–7© 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 10/2014; DOI:10.1002/pbc.25275 · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Healthy lifestyle habits have been associated with improved health outcomes and quality of life and, for some cancers, a reduced risk of recurrence and death. The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship therefore recommend that cancer survivors be encouraged to achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle, with attention to weight management, physical activity, and dietary habits. This section of the NCCN Guidelines focuses on recommendations regarding physical activity in survivors, including assessment for the risk of exercise-induced adverse events, exercise prescriptions, guidance for resistance training, and considerations for specific populations (eg, survivors with lymphedema, ostomies, peripheral neuropathy). In addition, strategies to encourage health behavioral change in survivors are discussed.
    Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN 09/2014; 12(9):1222-37. · 4.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cancer survivors are at an elevated risk for infection because of immune suppression associated with prior cancer treatments, and they are at increased risk of complications from vaccine-preventable diseases. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides recommendations for the prevention of infections in survivors through education, antimicrobial prophylaxis, and the judicious use of vaccines. These guidelines provide information about travel and gardening precautions and safe pet care/avoidance of zoonosis, and include detailed recommendations regarding vaccinations that should be considered and encouraged in cancer and transplant survivors.
    Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN 08/2014; 12(8):1098-111. · 4.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cognitive impairment is a common complaint among cancer survivors and may be a consequence of the tumors themselves or direct effects of cancer-related treatment (eg, chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, radiation). For some survivors, symptoms persist over the long term and, when more severe, can impact quality of life and function. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides assessment, evaluation, and management recommendations for cognitive dysfunction in survivors. Nonpharmacologic interventions (eg, instruction in coping strategies; management of distress, pain, sleep disturbances, and fatigue; occupational therapy) are recommended, with pharmacologic interventions as a last line of therapy in survivors for whom other interventions have been insufficient.
    Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN 07/2014; 12(7):976-86. · 4.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many cancer survivors report that fatigue is a disruptive symptom even after treatment ends. Persistent cancer-related fatigue affects quality of life, because individuals become too tired to fully participate in the roles and activities that make life meaningful. Identification and management of fatigue remains an unmet need for many cancer survivors. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides screening, evaluation, and management recommendations for fatigue in survivors. Management includes education and counseling, physical activity, psychosocial interventions, and pharmacologic treatments.
    Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN 06/2014; 12(6):876-87. · 4.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sleep disorders, including insomnia and excessive sleepiness, affect a significant proportion of patients with cancer and survivors, often in combination with fatigue, anxiety, and depression. Improvements in sleep lead to improvements in fatigue, mood, and quality of life. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides screening, diagnosis, and management recommendations for sleep disorders in survivors. Management includes combinations of sleep hygiene education, physical activity, psychosocial interventions, and pharmacologic treatments.
    Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN 05/2014; 12(5):630-42. · 4.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many posttreatment cancer survivors experience chronic pain, often leading to psychological distress; decreased activity, motivation, and personal interactions; and an overall poor quality of life. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides screening and management recommendations for pain in survivors. A multidisciplinary approach is recommended, with a combination of pharmacologic treatments, psychosocial and behavioral interventions, physical therapy and exercise, and interventional procedures.
    Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN 04/2014; 12(4):488-500. · 4.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Corticosteroids increase risk for decreased bone mineral density, which can be worsened by vitamin D insufficiency (VDI) or deficiency (VDD). In the Vanderbilt cancer survivorship clinic, we obtained screening total 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels (VDL) in 171 cancer survivors <23 years old who were treated with prolonged corticosteroids for their cancer, and compared this group to a control group of 97 healthy pediatric patients. VDD was diagnosed in 15.8% and VDI in 34.5% of cancer survivors and VDD/VDI combined was associated with body mass index (BMI) >85th percentile (Odds ratio [OR] = 5.4; P < 0.001), older age (OR = 2.2; P = 0.012), non-Caucasian or Hispanic race (OR = 4.5; P = 0.008) and summer versus winter season (OR = 0.12; P < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, VDI/VDD prevalence did not differ from the control group (VDI/VDD (43.3%)). In the combined survivor/control group multivariable analysis, cancer diagnosis did not increase VDI/VDD risk, but significant associations persisted with elevated BMI (P < 0.001), age (P = 0.004), non-Caucasian or Hispanic race (P < 0.001), and seasonality (P < 0.001). VDD/VDI is equally common in pediatric cancer survivors treated with corticosteroids and healthy children. The impact of VDD/VDI in cancer survivors may be greater due to risk for impaired bone health superimposed on that conferred from corticosteroid exposure. Thus, screening VDLs should be obtained in pediatric cancer survivors treated with corticosteroids, particularly in those with elevated BMI, older age, or non-Caucasian race. Prospective studies evaluating the impact of interventions to minimize VDD/VDI on long-term bone health in survivors are required. Pediatr Blood Cancer © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 04/2014; 61(4). DOI:10.1002/pbc.24844 · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To better understand the combined effects of pre-transplant, transplant, and post-transplant factors in determining risks of serious cardiovascular disease following hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Hospitalizations and deaths associated with serious cardiovascular outcomes were identified among 1,379 Washington State residents who received HCT (57% allogeneic; 43% autologous) at a single center from 1985-2005, survived ≥2 years, and followed through 2008. Using a nested-case-cohort design, relationships (hazard ratios, HR) between potential risk factors and outcomes were examined among affected survivors and a randomly selected sub-cohort (n=509). After 7.0 years median follow-up (range 2.0-23.7), the 10-year cumulative incidence of ischemic heart disease, cardiomyopathy, stroke, and all-cause cardiovascular death was 3.8%, 6.0%, 3.5%, and 3.7%, respectively. In multivariable analysis, increased pre-transplant anthracyclines was associated with cardiomyopathy. Active chronic graft vs. host disease was associated with cardiovascular death (HR 4.0, 95% CI 1.1-14.7); risk was otherwise similar between autologous vs. allogeneic HCT recipients. Independent of therapeutic exposures, pre-transplant smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and obesity conferred additional risk of all outcomes except stroke (HR ≥1.5 for each additional risk factor, p<0.03). Hypertension and dyslipidemia at one year with persistence of these conditions two or more years following HCT also were associated with independent risks of multiple outcomes. Hematopoietic cell transplant survivors with pre-existing or newly developed and persistent cardiovascular risk factors remain at greater risk of subsequent serious cardiovascular disease compared with other survivors, independent of chemo- and radiotherapy exposures. These survivors should receive appropriate follow-up and be considered for primary intervention.
    Biology of blood and marrow transplantation: journal of the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation 02/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.bbmt.2014.02.012 · 3.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There exist significant challenges to the receipt of comprehensive oncologic treatment for children diagnosed with cancer in sub-Saharan Africa. To better define those challenges, we investigated treatment outcomes and risk factors for treatment abandonment in a cohort of children diagnosed with cancer at the University Teaching Hospital (UTH), the site of the only pediatric oncology ward in Zambia. Using an established database, a retrospective cohort study was conducted of children aged 0-15 years admitted to the pediatric oncology ward between July 2008 and June 2010 with suspected cancer. Diagnosis, mode of diagnosis, treatment outcome, and risk factors for abandonment of treatment were abstracted from this database and clinical medical records. Among 162 children treated at the UTH during the study time period that met inclusion criteria, only 8.0% completed a treatment regimen with most of the patients dying during treatment or abandoning care. In multivariable analysis, shorter distance from home to the UTH was associated with a lower risk of treatment abandonment (Adjusted Odds Ratio [aOR] = 0.48 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.23-0.97). Conversely maternal education less than secondary school was associated with increased risk for abandonment (aOR = 1.65; 95% CI 1.05-2.58). Despite availability of dedicated pediatric oncology treatment, treatment completion rates are poor, due in part to the logistical challenges faced by families, low educational status, and significant distance from the hospital. Alternative treatment delivery strategies are required to bring effective pediatric oncology care to the patients in need, as their ability to come to and remain at a central tertiary care facility for treatment is limited. We suggest that the extensive system now in place in most of sub-Saharan Africa that sustains life-long antiretroviral therapy for children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection be adapted for pediatric cancer treatment to improve outcome.
    PLoS ONE 02/2014; 9(2):e89102. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0089102 · 3.53 Impact Factor
    This article is viewable in ResearchGate's enriched format
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    ABSTRACT: Cancer treatment, especially hormonal therapy and therapy directed toward the pelvis, can contribute to sexual problems, as can depression and anxiety, which are common in cancer survivors. Thus, sexual dysfunction is common in survivors and can cause increased distress and have a significant negative impact on quality of life. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for female sexual problems, including those related to sexual desire, arousal, orgasm, and pain.
    Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN 02/2014; 12(2):184-92. · 4.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Extensive patient and family education is required at the time of a new diagnosis of pediatric cancer yet little data exist regarding the availability and linguistic competency of new cancer diagnosis education provided by pediatric oncology institutions. Using the American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (ASPHO) membership list, a web-based survey was conducted among a cohort of pediatric oncologists to determine pediatric oncologists' assessment of institutional resources for new cancer diagnosis education and the availability of linguistically appropriate education. Of 1,294 ASPHO members sent email survey invitations, 573 (44.3%) responded with 429 meeting eligibility criteria. Oncologists at academic institutions reported their institutions had more availability of resources for new diagnosis education compared with those from non-academic institutions (mean 78.6 vs. 74.3; 0 [not at all]-100 [well equipped]; P = 0.05). The mean score increased with volume of new cancer diagnoses/year: small (<75) = 73.4; medium (75-149) = 76.7; large (>150) = 84.5 (P < 0.001). Oncologists at large volume institutions reported more availability of an established patient education protocol (50.8% vs. 38.1%, P < 0.001) and increased use of dedicated non-physician staff (79.9% vs. 66.1%, P = 0.02), but less use of websites for patient education (17.2% vs. 33.3%, P = 0.001). Availability of linguistically appropriate education improved with increasing institution size: small (76.4), medium (82.3), and large (84.0) patient volume (P < 0.011). According to pediatric oncologists, a disparity in educational and linguistic resources for new pediatric cancer diagnosis education exists depending on institution type and size. Pediatr Blood Cancer © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 02/2014; 61(2). DOI:10.1002/pbc.24831 · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk of obesity and deconditioning from cancer therapy. This pilot study assessed feasibility/initial efficacy of an exercise intervention for patients with ALL undergoing maintenance therapy.
    Pediatric Physical Therapy 01/2014; 26(3):301-307. DOI:10.1097/PEP.0000000000000053 · 1.29 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4k Citations
686.47 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005–2015
    • Vanderbilt University
      • • Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      Нашвилл, Michigan, United States
    • Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario
      Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • 2009–2014
    • Gateway-Vanderbilt Cancer Treatment Center
      Clarksville, Tennessee, United States
    • Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
      • Department of Pediatrics
      New York City, NY, United States
  • 2004–2009
    • Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
      • Division of Clinical Research
      Seattle, Washington, United States
    • Harvard University
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
    • Harvard Medical School
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1999–2009
    • The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2004–2008
    • Seattle Children's Hospital
      • Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center
      Seattle, Washington, United States
  • 2002–2008
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Seattle, Washington, United States