Rupert Lanzenberger

Medical University of Vienna, Wien, Vienna, Austria

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Publications (226)1001.58 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Recent technological progress enables MRI recordings at ultra-high fields of 7 Tesla and above leading to brain images of higher resolution and increased signal-to-noise ratio. Despite these benefits, imaging at 7T exhibits distinct challenges due to B1 field inhomogeneities, causing decreased image quality and problems in data analysis. Although several strategies have been proposed, a systematic investigation of bias-corrected 7T data for voxel-based morphometry (VBM) is still missing and it is an ongoing matter of debate if VBM at 7T can be carried out properly. Here, an optimized VBM study was conducted, evaluating the impact of field strength (3T vs 7T) and pulse sequence (MPRAGE vs MP2RAGE) on gray matter volume (GMV) estimates. More specifically, twenty-two participants were measured under the conditions 3T MPRAGE, 7T MPRAGE and 7T MP2RAGE. Due to the fact that 7T MPRAGE data exhibited strong intensity inhomogeneities, an alternative preprocessing pipeline was proposed and applied for that data. VBM analysis revealed higher GMV estimates for 7T predominantly in superior cortical areas, caudate nucleus, cingulate cortex and the hippocampus. On the other hand, 3T yielded higher estimates especially in inferior cortical areas of the brain, cerebellum, thalamus and putamen compared to 7T. Besides minor exceptions, these results were observed for 7T MPRAGE as well for the 7T MP2RAGE measurements. Results gained in the inferior parts of the brain should be taken with caution, as native GM segmentations displayed misclassifications in these regions for both 7T sequences. This was supported by the test-retest measurements showing highest variability in these inferior regions of the brain for 7T also for the advanced MP2RAGE sequence. Hence, our data support the use of 7T MRI for VBM analysis in cortical areas, but direct comparison between field strengths and sequences requires careful assessment. Similarly, analysis of inferior cortical regions, cerebellum and subcortical regions still remains challenging at 7T even if the advanced MP2RAGE sequence is used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    NeuroImage 03/2015; 113. DOI:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.03.019 · 6.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated whether s-ketamine differentially affects strategic allocation of attention. In Experiment 1, (1) a less visible cue was weakly masked by the onsets of competing placeholders or (2) a better visible cue was not masked because it was presented in isolation. Both types of cue appeared more often opposite of the target (75%) than at target position (25%). With this setup, we tested for strategic attention shifts to the opposite side of the cues and for exogenous attentional capture toward the cue's side in a short cue-target interval, as well as for (reverse) cueing effects in a long cue-target interval after s-ketamine and after placebo treatment in a double-blind within-participant design. We found reduced strategic attention shifts after cues presented without placeholders for the s-ketamine compared to the placebo treatment in the short interval, indicating an early effect on the strategic allocation of attention. No differences between the two treatments were found for exogenous attentional capture by less visible cues, suggesting that s-ketamine does not affect exogenous attentional capture in the presence of competing distractors. Experiment 2 confirmed that the competing onsets of the placeholders prevented the strategic cueing effect. Taken together, the results indicate that s-ketamine affects strategic attentional capture, but not exogenous attentional capture. The findings point to a more prominent role of s-ketamine during top-down controlled forms of attention that require suppression of automatic capture than during automatic capture itself. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.
    Consciousness and Cognition 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.concog.2015.01.009 · 2.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: For over a decade, the European Group for the Study of Resistant Depression (GSRD) has examined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and clinical parameters in regard to treatment outcome. However, an interaction based model combining these factors has not been established yet. Regarding the low effect of individual SNPs, a model investigating the interactive role of SNPs and clinical variables in treatment-resistant depression (TRD) seems auspicious. Thus 225 patients featured in previous work of the GSRD were enrolled in this investigation. According to data availability and previous positive results, 12 SNPs in HTR2A, COMT, ST8SIA2, PPP3CC and BDNF as well as 8 clinical variables featured in other GSRD studies were chosen for this investigation. Random forests algorithm were used for variable shrinkage and k-means clustering for surfacing variable characteristics determining treatment outcome. Using these machine learning and clustering algorithms, we detected a set of 3 SNPs and a clinical variable that was significantly associated with treatment response. About 62% of patients exhibiting the allelic combination of GG-GG-TT for rs6265, rs7430 and rs6313 of the BDNF, PPP3CC and HTR2A genes, respectively, and without melancholia showed a HAM-D decline under 17 compared to about 34% of the whole study sample. Our random forests prediction model for treatment outcome showed that combining clinical and genetic variables gradually increased the prediction performance recognizing correctly 25% of responders using all 4 factors. Thus, we could confirm our previous findings and furthermore show the strength of an interaction-based model combining statistical algorithms in identifying and operating treatment predictors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.
    European Neuropsychopharmacology 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.euroneuro.2015.01.001 · 5.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Serotonergic neurotransmission is thought to underlie a dynamic interrelation between different key structures of the serotonin system. The serotonin transporter (SERT), which is responsible for the reuptake of serotonin from the synaptic cleft into the neuron, as well as the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) and -1B (5-HT1B) receptors, inhibitory auto-receptors in the raphe region and projection areas, respectively, are likely to determine serotonin release. Thereby, they are involved in the regulation of extracellular serotonin concentrations and the extent of serotonergic effects in respective projection areas. Complex receptor interactions can be assessed in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET) and single-nucleotide-polymorphisms, which are thought to alter protein expression levels. Due to the complexity of the serotonergic system, gene x gene interactions are likely to regulate transporter and receptor expression and therefore subsequently serotonergic transmission. In this context, we measured 51 healthy subjects (mean age 45.5±12.9, 38 female) with PET using [carbonyl-(11)C]WAY-100635 to determine 5-HT1A receptor binding potential (5-HT1A BPND). Genotyping for rs6296 (HTR1B) and 5-HTTLPR (SERT gene promoter polymorphism) was performed using DNA isolated from whole blood. Voxel-wise whole-brain ANOVA revealed a positive interaction effect of genotype groups (5-HTTLPR: LL, LS+SS and HTR1B: rs6296: CC, GC+GG) on 5-HT1A BPND with peak t-values in the bilateral parahippocampal gyrus. More specifically, highest 5-HT1A BPND was identified for individuals homozygous for both the L-allele of 5-HTTLPR and the C-allele of rs6296. This finding suggests that the interaction between two major serotonergic structures involved in 5-HT release, specifically the SERT and 5-HT1B receptor, results in a modification of the inhibitory serotonergic tone mediated via 5-HT1A receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    NeuroImage 01/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.01.049 · 6.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) is involved in cardiovascular, neurological and tumour-related pathologies and serves as an exceptional pharmaceutical target in the clinical setting. A3R antagonists are considered antiinflammatory, antiallergic and anticancer agents, and to have potential for the treatment of asthma, COPD, glaucoma and stroke. Hence, an appropriate A3R PET tracer would be highly beneficial for the diagnosis and therapy monitoring of these diseases. Therefore, in this preclinical in vivo study we evaluated the potential as a PET tracer of the A3R antagonist [(18)F]FE@SUPPY. Rats were injected with [(18)F]FE@SUPPY for baseline scans and blocking scans (A3R with MRS1523 or FE@SUPPY, P-gp with tariquidar; three animals each). Additionally, metabolism was studied in plasma and brain. In a preliminary experiment in a mouse xenograft model (mice injected with cells expressing the human A3R; three animals), the animals received [(18)F]FE@SUPPY and [(18)F]FDG. Dynamic PET imaging was performed (60 min in rats, 90 min in xenografted mice). In vitro stability of [(18)F]FE@SUPPY in human and rat plasma was also evaluated. [(18)F]FE@SUPPY showed high uptake in fat-rich regions and low uptake in the brain. Pretreatment with MRS1523 led to a decrease in [(18)F]FE@SUPPY uptake (p = 0.03), and pretreatment with the P-gp inhibitor tariquidar led to a 1.24-fold increase in [(18)F]FE@SUPPY uptake (p = 0.09) in rat brain. There was no significant difference in metabolites in plasma and brain in the treatment groups. However, plasma concentrations of [(18)F]FE@SUPPY were reduced to levels similar to those in rat brain after blocking. In contrast to [(18)F]FDG uptake (p = 0.12), the xenograft model showed significantly increased uptake of [(18)F]FE@SUPPY in the tissue masses from CHO cells expressing the human A3R (p = 0.03). [(18)F]FE@SUPPY was stable in human plasma. Selective and significant tracer uptake of [(18)F]FE@SUPPY was found in xenografted mice injected with cells expressing human A3R. This finding supports the strategy of evaluating [(18)F]FE@SUPPY in "humanized animal models". In conclusion, preclinical evaluation points to the suitability of [(18)F]FE@SUPPY as an A3R PET tracer in humans.
    European journal of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging 01/2015; 42(5). DOI:10.1007/s00259-014-2976-3 · 5.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was the evaluation and automation of the radiosynthesis of [(11)C]harmine for clinical trials. The following parameters have been investigated: amount of base, precursor concentration, solvent, reaction temperature and time. The optimum reaction conditions were determined to be 2-3mg/mL precursor activated with 1eq. 5M NaOH in DMSO, 80°C reaction temperature and 2min reaction time. Under these conditions 6.1±1GBq (51.0±11% based on [(11)C]CH3I, corrected for decay) of [(11)C]harmine (n=72) were obtained. The specific activity was 101.32±28.2GBq/µmol (at EOS). All quality control parameters were in accordance with the standards for parenteral human application. Due to its reliability and high yields, this fully-automated synthesis method can be used as routine set-up. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.
    Applied Radiation and Isotopes 01/2015; 97C:182-187. DOI:10.1016/j.apradiso.2015.01.002 · 1.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study investigated whether the same visual stimulus indicating zero-value feedback (€0) elicits Feedback-Related Negativity (FRN) variation, depending on whether the outcomes correspond with expectations or not. Thirty-one volunteers performed a monetary incentive delay (MID) task while EEG was recorded. FRN amplitudes were comparable and more negative when zero-value outcome deviated from expectations than with expected gain or loss, supporting theories emphasising the impact of unexpectedness and salience on FRN amplitudes. Surprisingly, expected zero-value outcomes elicited the most negative FRNs. However, source localisation showed that such outcomes evoked less activation in cingulate areas than unexpected zero-value outcomes. Our study illustrates the context dependency of identical zero-value feedback stimuli. Moreover, the results indicate that the incentive cues in the MID task evoke different reward prediction error signals. These prediction signals differ in FRN amplitude and neuronal sources, and have to be considered in the design and interpretation of future studies. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    Biological Psychology 12/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.biopsycho.2014.12.007 · 3.47 Impact Factor
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    Dataset: mmc1
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    Dataset: mmc1
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    ABSTRACT: On average, brain network economy represents a trade-off between communication efficiency, robustness and connection cost, though, an analogous understanding on an individual level is largely missing. Evaluating resting-state networks of 42 healthy participants with 7 Tesla functional MRI and graph theory revealed that not even half of all possible connections were common across subjects. The strongest similarities among individuals were observed for interhemispheric and/or short-range connections, which may relate to the essential feature of the human brain to develop specialized systems within each hemisphere. Despite this marked variability in individual network architecture, all subjects exhibited equal small-world properties. Furthermore, interdependency between four major network economy metrics was observed across healthy individuals. The characteristic path length was associated with the clustering coefficient (r=0.93), the response to network attacks (peak correlation r=-0.97) and the physical connection cost in 3D space (r=-0.62). On the other hand, clustering was negatively related to attack response (r=-0.75) and connection cost (r=-0.59). Finally, increased connection cost was associated with better response to attacks (r=0.65). This indicates that functional brain networks with high global information transfer also exhibit strong network resilience. However, it seems that these advantages come at the cost of decreased local communication efficiency and increased physical connection cost. Except for wiring length, the results were replicated on a subsample at 3 Tesla (n=20). These findings highlight the finely tuned interrelationships between different parameters of brain network economy. Moreover, the understanding of the individual diversity of functional brain network economy may provide further insights in the vulnerability to mental and neurological disorders.
    11/2014; DOI:10.1089/brain.2014.0306
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    ABSTRACT: Biological causes underpinning the well known gender dimorphisms in human behavior, cognition, and emotion have received increased attention in recent years. The advent of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging has permitted the investigation of the white matter microstructure in unprecedented detail. Here, we aimed to study the potential influences of biological sex, gender identity, sex hormones, and sexual orientation on white matter microstructure by investigating transsexuals and healthy controls using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Twenty-three female-to-male (FtM) and 21 male-to-female (MtF) transsexuals, as well as 23 female (FC) and 22 male (MC) controls underwent DTI at 3 tesla. Fractional anisotropy, axial, radial, and mean diffusivity were calculated using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) and fiber tractography. Results showed widespread significant differences in mean diffusivity between groups in almost all white matter tracts. FCs had highest mean diffusivities, followed by FtM transsexuals with lower values, MtF transsexuals with further reduced values, and MCs with lowest values. Investigating axial and radial diffusivities showed that a transition in axial diffusivity accounted for mean diffusivity results. No significant differences in fractional anisotropy maps were found between groups. Plasma testosterone levels were strongly correlated with mean, axial, and radial diffusivities. However, controlling for individual estradiol, testosterone, or progesterone plasma levels or for subjects' sexual orientation did not change group differences. Our data harmonize with the hypothesis that fiber tract development is influenced by the hormonal environment during late prenatal and early postnatal brain development.
    The Journal of Neuroscience : The Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience 11/2014; 34(46):15466-75. DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2488-14.2014 · 6.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recently, Silexan, a patented active substance comprised of an essential oil produced from Lavandula angustifolia flowers, has been authorized in Germany as a medicinal product for the treatment of states of restlessness related to anxious mood. Its efficacy has been shown in several forms of anxiety disorders. Findings from preclinical and clinical studies attribute a major role in the pathogenesis and treatment of anxiety to the serotonin-1A receptor (5-HT1A). To elucidate the effect of Silexan on 5-HT1A receptor binding, 17 healthy men underwent two positron emission tomography measurements using the radioligand [carbonyl-(11)C]WAY-100635 following the daily intake of 160 mg Silexan or placebo over a minimum of eight weeks, respectively (randomized, double-blind, cross-over design). Additionally, structural magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based morphometry analysis was performed to determine potential effects on gray matter microstructure. 5-HT1A receptor binding potential was shown to be significantly reduced following the intake of Silexan compared to placebo in two large clusters encompassing the temporal gyrus, the fusiform gyrus, the hippocampus on one hand as well as the insula and the anterior cingulate cortex on the other hand. No effects of Silexan on gray matter volume could be detected in this investigation. This PET study proposes an involvement of the serotonin-1A receptor in the anxiolytic effects of Silexan. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.
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    ABSTRACT: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) research has long focused on the dopaminergic system's contribution to pathogenesis, although the results have been inconclusive. However, a case has been made for the involvement of the noradrenergic system, which modulates cognitive processes, such as arousal, working memory, and response inhibition, all of which are typically affected in ADHD. Furthermore, the norepinephrine transporter (NET) is an important target for frequently prescribed medication in ADHD. Therefore, the NET is suggested to play a critical role in ADHD.
    JAMA Psychiatry 10/2014; 71(12). DOI:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1226 · 12.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Depressive disorder is frequently accompanied by changes in psychomotor activity and disturbances of the sleep-wake cycle. The chronobiological effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) are largely unknown. The objective of the current study was to measure the influence of ECT on patients’ activity and sleep. 15 patients with unipolar TRD were treated with ECT. Activity levels were measured with wrist actigraphy before and after ECT. Remission rate (score on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale lower than 8 points) was 40.0%. Remitters had increases of 56.0% on light activity, 49.8% on total activity, and 70.2% on circadian amplitude, while there was no significant change of these variables in subjects who did not experience remission. The circadian acrophase and actigraphic sleep-parameters were not significantly affected by treatment.
    Journal of Psychiatric Research 10/2014; 57. DOI:10.1016/j.jpsychires.2014.06.006 · 4.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Anticipatory processes prepare the organism for upcoming experiences. The aim of this study was to investigate neural responses related to anticipation and processing of painful stimuli occurring with different levels of uncertainty. Experimental design: Twenty-five participants (13 females) took part in an electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment at separate times. A visual cue announced the occurrence of an electrical painful or nonpainful stimulus, delivered with certainty or uncertainty (50% chance), at some point during the following 15 s. Principal observations: During the first 2 s of the anticipation phase, a strong effect of uncertainty was reflected in a pronounced frontal stimulus-preceding negativity (SPN) and increased fMRI activation in higher visual processing areas. In the last 2 s before stimulus delivery, we observed stimulus-specific preparatory processes indicated by a centroparietal SPN and posterior insula activation that was most pronounced for the certain pain condition. Uncertain anticipation was associated with attentional control processes. During stimulation, the results revealed that unexpected painful stimuli produced the strongest activation in the affective pain processing network and a more pronounced offset-P2. Conclusions: Our results reflect that during early anticipation uncertainty is strongly associated with affective mechanisms and seems to be a more salient event compared to certain anticipation. During the last 2 s before stimulation, attentional control mechanisms are initiated related to the increased salience of uncertainty. Furthermore, stimulus-specific preparatory mechanisms during certain anticipation also shaped the response to stimulation, underlining the adaptive value of stimulus-targeted preparatory activity which is less likely when facing an uncertain event. Hum Brain Mapp, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Human Brain Mapping 10/2014; 36(2). DOI:10.1002/hbm.22661 · 6.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Women are two times more likely to be diagnosed with depression than men. Sex hormones modulating serotonergic transmission are proposed to partly underlie these epidemiological findings. Here, we used the cross-sex steroid hormone treatment of transsexuals seeking sex reassignment as a model to investigate acute and chronic effects of testosterone and estradiol on serotonin transporter (SERT) binding in female-to-male (FtM) and male-to-female (MtF) transsexuals. Methods 33 transsexuals underwent [11C]DASB PET before start of treatment, a subset of which underwent a second scan four weeks, and a third scan four months, after treatment start. SERT BPND was quantified in 12 regions of interest. Treatment effects were analyzed using linear mixed models. Changes of hormone plasma levels were correlated with changes in regional SERT BPND. Results One and four months of androgen treatment in FtM increased SERT binding in amygdala, caudate, putamen and median raphe nucleus. SERT binding increases correlated with treatment induced increases in testosterone levels, suggesting that testosterone increases SERT expression on the cell surface. Conversely, four months of anti-androgen and estrogen treatment in MtF led to decreases in SERT binding in insula, anterior and mid-cingulate cortex. Increases in estradiol levels correlated negatively with decreases in regional SERT binding, indicating a protective effect of estradiol against SERT loss. Conclusions Given the central role of the SERT in the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders, these findings may lead to new treatment modalities and expand our understanding of the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatment properties. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01065220 https://clinicaltrials.gov/
    Biological Psychiatry 09/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.biopsych.2014.09.010 · 9.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The (fractional) amplitudes of low-frequency fluctuations (f)ALFF are popular measures for the magnitude of low-frequency oscillations in resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) data. Both measures can be directly derived from the spectral power of R-fMRI time courses. Numerous studies suggest that ALFF and fALFF might be used as biomarkers for a variety of diseases including schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. However, the temporal stability of (f)ALFF values, which is of great importance for the application of (f)ALFF both as a biomarker and scaling parameter, have not been studied in detail yet. Here, we quantify the temporal stability, robustness and reproducibility of both ALFF and fALFF maps obtained from R-fMRI data by performing statistical analyses over 55-minute resting-state scans which included a period of NaCl infusion. We also examine the differences of using either raw or standardised (f)ALFF maps. Our analyses show that no significant changes of (f)ALFF values over the 55minute period occur for both raw and standardised (f)ALFF maps. In addition, we demonstrate that raw (f)ALFF maps across subject are correlated with head motion as quantified via frame-wise displacement, whereas no such correlation is present in standardised (f)ALFF maps. In conclusion, the results of our study show that both ALFF and fALFF qualify as potential biomarkers due to their high temporal stability.
    NeuroImage 09/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.09.038 · 6.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although previous investigations of transsexual people have focused on regional brain alterations, evaluations on a network level, especially those structural in nature, are largely missing. Therefore, we investigated the structural connectome of 23 female-to-male (FtM) and 21 male-to-female (MtF) transgender patients before hormone therapy as compared with 25 female and 25 male healthy controls. Graph theoretical analysis of whole-brain probabilistic tractography networks (adjusted for differences in intracranial volume) showed decreased hemispheric connectivity ratios of subcortical/limbic areas for both transgender groups. Subsequent analysis revealed that this finding was driven by increased interhemispheric lobar connectivity weights (LCWs) in MtF transsexuals and decreased intrahemispheric LCWs in FtM patients. This was further reflected on a regional level, where the MtF group showed mostly increased local efficiencies and FtM patients decreased values. Importantly, these parameters separated each patient group from the remaining subjects for the majority of significant findings. This work complements previously established regional alterations with important findings of structural connectivity. Specifically, our data suggest that network parameters may reflect unique characteristics of transgender patients, whereas local physiological aspects have been shown to represent the transition from the biological sex to the actual gender identity.
    Cerebral Cortex 09/2014; DOI:10.1093/cercor/bhu194 · 8.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BackgroundThe brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism (rs6265) may impact on the in-vivo binding of important serotonergic structures such as the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) and the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor. Previous positron emission tomography (PET) studies on the association between Val66Met and 5-HTT and 5-HT1A binding potential (BPND) have demonstrated equivocal results.MethodsWe conducted an imaging genetics study investigating the effect of Val66Met genotype on 5-HTT or 5-HT1A BPND in 92 subjects. Forty-one subjects (25 healthy subjects and 16 depressive patients) underwent genotyping for Val66Met and PET imaging with the 5-HTT specific radioligand [11C]DASB. Additionally, in 51 healthy subjects Val66Met genotypes and 5-HT1A binding with the radioligand [carbonyl-11C]WAY-100635 were ascertained. Voxel-wise and region of interest-based analyses of variance were used to examine the influence of Val66Met on 5-HTT and 5-HT1A BPND.ResultsNo significant differences of 5-HTT nor 5-HT1A BPND between BDNF Val66Met genotype groups (val/val vs. met-carrier) were detected. There was no interaction between depression and Val66Met genotype status.ConclusionIn line with previous data, our work confirms an absent effect of BDNF Val66Met on two major serotonergic structures. These results could suggest that altered protein expression associated with genetic variants, might be compensated in vivo by several levels of unknown feedback mechanisms. In conclusion, Val66Met genotype status is not associated with changes of in-vivo binding of 5-HTT and 5-HT1A receptors in human subjects.
    PLoS ONE 09/2014; 9(9):e106810. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0106810 · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Siegfried Kasper, Gregor Gryglewski, Rupert Lanzenberger
    The Lancet Psychiatry 09/2014; 1(4). DOI:10.1016/S2215-0366(14)70348-7

Publication Stats

2k Citations
1,001.58 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2000–2015
    • Medical University of Vienna
      • • Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
      • • Universitätsklinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie
      • • Department of Nuclear Medicine
      • • Klinische Abteilung für Sozialpsychiatrie
      • • Department of Neurology
      • • Clinical Department of Virology
      Wien, Vienna, Austria
  • 2012
    • National Institutes of Health
      • Branch of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
      Bethesda, MD, United States
  • 2001–2008
    • University of Vienna
      • • Brain Research Institute
      • • Neurological Clinic
      Wien, Vienna, Austria
  • 2007
    • University College Cork
      • Department of Psychiatry
      Corcaigh, Munster, Ireland
  • 2000–2004
    • Vienna General Hospital
      Wien, Vienna, Austria