Jianyong Wang

University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR, United States

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Publications (3)5.31 Total impact

  • Jianyong Wang, Wenjun Sun, Syed F. Ali
    08/2009: pages 171 - 182; , ISBN: 9780470747803
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    ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons with unknown etiology. MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion) is the active metabolite of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), which induces Parkinson's-like symptoms in humans and animals. MPTP/MPP+ produces selective dopaminergic neuronal degeneration, therefore, these agents are commonly used to study the pathogenesis of PD. However, the mechanisms of their toxicity have not been fully elucidated. Recently, we reported in a microarray study using a midbrain-derived dopaminergic neuronal cell line, MN9D, that MPP+ induced significant changes in a number of genes known to be associated with the dopaminergic system. In this study, we investigated the expression time courses of six genes using real-time RT-PCR, and compared them with the progressive dopaminergic depletion caused by MPP+. Our data showed that dopamine content was significantly decreased after 0.5h of MPP+ (200 microM) exposure and was completely depleted after 40 h. The expression of Gpr37, which is closely related to the pathogenesis of autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinsonism, was up-regulated after 0.5h, and stayed up-regulated up to 48 h. Txnip, which is critical to the adjustment of cellular redox status, was down-regulated after 1h and stayed down-regulated up to 48 h. Ldh1 and Cdo1, which are also involved in oxidative stress, were down-regulated after 16 h and stayed down-regulated up to 48 h. Two pro-apoptotic genes, Egln3 and Bnip3, were down-regulated after 2 and 4h, and stayed down-regulated up to 48 h. These findings suggested that the time course of expression for multiple genes correlated with the dopaminergic depletion; and MPP+-induced neurotoxicity in MN9D cells could be used as a model to further explore the roles of these and other genes in the pathogenesis and possible treatment of PD.
    Neurochemistry International 06/2008; 52(6):1037-43. · 2.66 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons with unknown etiology. MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium) is the active metabolite of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), which induces Parkinson's-like syndromes in humans and animals. MPTP/MPP+ treatment produces selective dopaminergic neuronal degeneration, therefore, these agents are commonly used to study the pathogenesis of PD. However, the mechanisms of their toxicity have not been elucidated. In order to gain insights into MPP+-induced neurotoxicity, a gene expression microarray study was performed using a midbrain-derived dopaminergic neuronal cell line, MN9D. Utilizing a two-color reference design, Agilent mouse oligonucleotide microarrays were used to examine relative gene expression changes in MN9D cells treated with 40microM MPP+ compared with controls. Bioinformatics tools were used for data evaluation. Briefly, raw data were imported into the NCTR ArrayTrack database, normalized using a Lowess method and data quality was assessed. The Student's t-test was used to determine significant changes in gene expression (set as p<0.05, fold change >1.5). Gene Ontology for Function Analysis (GOFFA) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis were employed to analyze the functions and roles of significant genes in biological processes. Of the 51 significant genes identified, 44 were present in the GOFFA or Ingenuity database. These data indicate that multiple pathways are involved in the underlying mechanisms of MPP+-induced neurotoxicity, including apoptosis, oxidative stress, iron binding, cellular metabolism, and signal transduction. These data also indicate that MPP+-induced toxicity shares common molecular mechanisms with the pathogenesis of PD and further pathway analyses will be conducted to explore these mechanisms.
    NeuroToxicology 10/2007; 28(5):979-87. · 2.65 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

15 Citations
5.31 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009
    • University of Arkansas at Little Rock
      • Department of Applied Sciences
      Little Rock, AR, United States
  • 2008
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
      Washington, Washington, D.C., United States