Toshihiro Kumabe

Kitasato University, Edo, Tōkyō, Japan

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Publications (208)433.08 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Survivors of pediatric brain tumors are often affected by late effects, such as motility disturbance of limb(s), seizure, ocular/visual impairment, endocrine abnormality, and higher brain dysfunction, resulting from the disease and its treatment. Appropriate provision of supportive care will require understanding the effects of these experiences on survivors' health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The aim of this study was to identify the relationships between late effects and specific aspects of the HRQOL of pediatric brain tumor survivors. We distributed questionnaires for measuring HRQOL to 138 survivors and their parents at 8 hospitals and 1 clinic in Japan and simultaneously surveyed late effects using information provided by the survivors' attending physicians. We compared the HRQOL of survivors with and survivors without specific late effects. A total of 106 survivors and their parents returned the questionnaires to the researchers. The HRQOL of survivors 18 years or older was negatively affected by all 5 late effects, indicating that their higher impairment was associated with diminished HRQOL. The HRQOL of survivors aged 12 to 17 years was negatively affected by 2 late effects (ocular/visual impairment and motility disturbance of the limbs). A part of the HRQOL subdomain (motor and cognitive functioning) of survivors aged 12 to 17 years was positively related to ocular/visual impairment. Five late effects influenced the HRQOL of pediatric brain tumor survivors. Nurses and other health professionals should provide specific care designed to support aspects of HRQOL affected by late effects. For example, survivors with ocular/visual impairment may be expected to require additional emotional support, and those with seizures or endocrine abnormalities may be expected to require additional support for sleep disorders.
    Cancer nursing 03/2014; · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Medulloblastoma comprises four distinct molecular subgroups: WNT, SHH, Group 3, and Group 4. Current medulloblastoma protocols stratify patients based on clinical features: patient age, metastatic stage, extent of resection, and histologic variant. Stark prognostic and genetic differences among the four subgroups suggest that subgroup-specific molecular biomarkers could improve patient prognostication. Molecular biomarkers were identified from a discovery set of 673 medulloblastomas from 43 cities around the world. Combined risk stratification models were designed based on clinical and cytogenetic biomarkers identified by multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses. Identified biomarkers were tested using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on a nonoverlapping medulloblastoma tissue microarray (n = 453), with subsequent validation of the risk stratification models. Subgroup information improves the predictive accuracy of a multivariable survival model compared with clinical biomarkers alone. Most previously published cytogenetic biomarkers are only prognostic within a single medulloblastoma subgroup. Profiling six FISH biomarkers (GLI2, MYC, chromosome 11 [chr11], chr14, 17p, and 17q) on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, we can reliably and reproducibly identify very low-risk and very high-risk patients within SHH, Group 3, and Group 4 medulloblastomas. Combining subgroup and cytogenetic biomarkers with established clinical biomarkers substantially improves patient prognostication, even in the context of heterogeneous clinical therapies. The prognostic significance of most molecular biomarkers is restricted to a specific subgroup. We have identified a small panel of cytogenetic biomarkers that reliably identifies very high-risk and very low-risk groups of patients, making it an excellent tool for selecting patients for therapy intensification and therapy de-escalation in future clinical trials.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 02/2014; · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autoimmune hypophysitis very rarely spreads to nearby organs outside the pituitary tissue, for unknown reasons, with only 5 reported cases of hypophysitis spreading over the cavernous sinus. Three patients presented with cases of non-infectious hypophysitis spreading outside the pituitary tissue over the cavernous sinus. All three cases were diagnosed with histological confirmation by transsphenoidal surgery, and the patients showed remarkable improvement with postoperative pulse dose steroid therapy, including disappearance of abnormal signal intensities in the bilateral hypothalami on magnetic resonance imaging, resolution of severe stenosis of the internal carotid artery, and normalization of swollen pituitary tissues. Two of 3 cases fulfilled the histological criteria of immunoglobulin G4-related disease, although none of the patients had high serum immunoglobulin G4 level. The true implications of such unusual spreading of hypophysitis to nearby organs are not fully understood, but the mechanism of occurrence might vary according to the timing of inflammation in this unusual mode of spreading. Pulse dose steroid therapy achieved remarkably good outcomes even in the patient with progressive severe stenosis of the internal carotid artery and rapid visual deterioration.
    BMC Research Notes 12/2013; 6(1):560.
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    ABSTRACT: Surgical resection is identified as an important prognostic factor for survival in patients undergoing initial resection of glioblastoma (GBM). However, in patients with tumor recurrence, the benefits of repeat surgery remain unclear. Recent reports have stated that the association between initial surgery for GBM and subventricular zone (SVZ) influences survival. The current study examined the relationship of SVZ involvement in recurrent GBM to survival time after reoperation. We conducted a retrospective review of 61 consecutive patients who had undergone repeat surgery for recurrent GBM at our institution between 1997 and 2010. Survival after repeat surgery were compared between patients with (n = 29) and without (n = 32) SVZ involvement at recurrence using univariate analysis with known prognostic factors, including sex, age, Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) score at recurrence, recurrent tumor size, initial SVZ involvement, and adjuvant therapy after repeat surgery, as variables. All 26 SVZ-positive tumors at initial diagnosis recurred as SVZ-positive tumors, while 32 of 35 SVZ-negative tumors at initial diagnosis remained SVZ-negative at recurrence; the remaining three were SVZ-positive at recurrence. Survival after repeat surgery was decreased in patients with recurrent GBM involving the SVZ at recurrence (p = 0.022). No other prognostic factors for survival after repeat surgery were identified in this study. This finding may have prognostic and therapeutic significance.
    Neurologia medico-chirurgica 12/2013; · 0.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Carmustine (BCNU) implants (Gliadel(®) Wafer, Eisai Inc., New Jersey, USA) for the treatment of malignant gliomas (MGs) were shown to enhance overall survival in comparison to placebo in controlled clinical trials in the United States and Europe. A prospective, multicenter phase I/II study involving Japanese patients with MGs was performed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of BCNU implants. The study enrolled 16 patients with newly diagnosed MGs and 8 patients with recurrent MGs. After the insertion of BCNU implants (8 sheets maximum, 61.6 mg BCNU) into the removal cavity, various chemotherapies (including temozolomide) and radiotherapies were applied. After placement, overall and progression-free survival rates and whole blood BCNU levels were evaluated. In patients with newly diagnosed MGs, the overall survival rates at 12 months and 24 months were 100.0% and 68.8%, and the progression-free survival rate at 12 months was 62.5%. In patients with recurrent MGs, the progression-free survival rate at 6 months was 37.5%. There were no grade 4 or higher adverse events noted due to BCNU implants, and grade 3 events were observed in 5 of 24 patients (20.8%). Whole blood BCNU levels reached a peak of 19.4 ng/mL approximately 3 hours after insertion, which was lower than 1/600 of the peak BCNU level recorded after intravenous injections. These levels decreased to less than the detection limit (2.00 ng/mL) after 24 hours. The results of this study involving Japanese patients are comparable to those of previous studies in the United States and Europe.
    Neurologia medico-chirurgica 11/2013; · 0.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) has been developed as a potentially effective drug-delivery strategy into the central nervous system. In contrast to systemic intravenous administration, local delivery achieves high concentration and prolonged retention in the local tissue, with increased chance of local toxicity, especially with toxic agents such as chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, the factors that affect local toxicity should be extensively studied. New METHOD: With the assumption that concentration-oriented evaluation of toxicity is important for local CED, we evaluated the appearance of local toxicity among different agents after delivery with CED and studied if it is dose dependent or concentration dependent. Local toxicity profile of chemotherapeutic agents delivered via CED indicates BCNU was dose-dependent, whereas that of ACNU was concentration-dependent. On the other hand, local toxicity for doxorubicin, which is not distributed effectively by CED, was dose-dependent. Local toxicity for PLD, which is extensively distributed by CED, was concentration-dependent. Comparison with Existing METHOD: Traditional evaluation of drug induced toxicity was dose-oriented. This is true for systemic intravascular delivery. However, with local CED, toxicity of several drugs exacerbated in concentration-dependent manner. From our study, local toxicity of drugs that are likely to distribute effectively tended to be concentration-dependent. Concentration rather than dose may be more important for the toxicity of agents that are effectively distributed by CED. Concentration-oriented evaluation of toxicity is more important for CED.
    Journal of neuroscience methods 11/2013; · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent advances in diagnostic imaging and experience with germinomas may allow for the differentiation of central nervous system germinomas from other tumors based on clinical information, without histological verification. We retrospectively analyzed clinically diagnosed germinoma-like tumors of the pineal and/or suprasellar regions. This was done to evaluate the efficacy of our strategy of defining germinoma-compatible tumors based on good responses to initial chemotherapy. The responses to chemotherapy and survival of 34 consecutive patients with germinoma-like tumors who underwent initial treatment from July 2001 to October 2010 were analyzed. The minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (minADC) value and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) were evaluated in recent patients. Twelve patients with histologically verified germinomas and 18 with germinoma-compatible tumors showed early logarithmic decreases in tumor volume in response to initial chemotherapy, typical low minADC values and typical MRS characteristics, including increased choline/creatine ratios, decreased N-acetylasparate/creatine ratios, and large lipid peaks. These patients had good progression-free survival. The other four patients, with histologically verified non-germinomas, showed no response to chemotherapy, and one patient with a pineoblastoma showed a similar minADC value and MRS characteristics to those of patients with germinomas. The response to initial chemotherapy can be used to distinguish germinoma-compatible tumors from non-germinoma in patients with germinoma-like tumors of the pineal and/or suprasellar regions. The evaluation of minADC and proton MRS are useful for distinguishing germinomas from other tumors. However, a subset of non-germinomas may show similar characteristics to germinomas. The benefit of bypassing unnecessary surgical intervention can be achieved, at least in Asian populations with a high incidence of germinomas.
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 11/2013; · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Carmustine (BCNU) implants (Gliadel® Wafer, Eisai Inc., New Jersey, USA) for the treatment of malignant gliomas (MGs) were shown to enhance overall survival in comparison to placebo in controlled clinical trials in the United States and Europe. A prospective, multicenter phase I/II study involving Japanese patients with MGs was performed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of BCNU implants. The study enrolled 16 patients with newly diagnosed MGs and 8 patients with recurrent MGs. After the insertion of BCNU implants (8 sheets maximum, 61.6 mg BCNU) into the removal cavity, various chemotherapies (including temozolomide) and radiotherapies were applied. After placement, overall and progression-free survival rates and whole blood BCNU levels were evaluated. In patients with newly diagnosed MGs, the overall survival rates at 12 months and 24 months were 100.0% and 68.8%, and the progression-free survival rate at 12 months was 62.5%. In patients with recurrent MGs, the progression-free survival rate at 6 months was 37.5%. There were no grade 4 or higher adverse events noted due to BCNU implants, and grade 3 events were observed in 5 of 24 patients (20.8%). Whole blood BCNU levels reached a peak of 19.4 ng/mL approximately 3 hours after insertion, which was lower than 1/600 of the peak BCNU level recorded after intravenous injections. These levels decreased to less than the detection limit (2.00 ng/mL) after 24 hours. The results of this study involving Japanese patients are comparable to those of previous studies in the United States and Europe.
    Neurologia medico-chirurgica 11/2013; · 0.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Age is one of the most important prognostic factors in glioblastoma patients, but no standard treatment has been established for elderly patients with this condition. We therefore conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate treatment regimens and outcomes in elderly glioblastoma patients. The study population consisted of 79 glioblastoma patients aged ≥76 years (median age 78.0 years; 34 men and 45 women). The median preoperative Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score was 60. Surgical procedures were classified as biopsy (31 patients, 39.2 %), <95 % resection of the tumor (21 patients, 26.9 %), and ≥95 % resection of the tumor (26 patients, 33.3 %). Sixty-seven patients (81.0 %) received radiotherapy and 45 patients (57.0 %) received chemotherapy. The median overall progression-free survival time was 6.8 months, and the median overall survival time was 9.8 months. Patients aged ≥78 years were significantly less likely to receive radiotherapy (p = 0.004). Patients with a postoperative KPS score of ≥60 were significantly more likely to receive maintenance chemotherapy (p = 0.008). Multivariate analyses identified two independent prognostic factors: postoperative KPS score ≥60 (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.531, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.315-0.894, p = 0.017) and temozolomide therapy (HR = 0.442, 95 % CI 0.25-0.784, p < 0.001).The findings of this study suggest that postoperative KPS score is an important prognostic factor for glioblastoma patients aged ≥76 years, and that these patients may benefit from temozolomide therapy.
    J Neurooncol. 10/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Resection of insulo-opercular gliomas carries the risk of postoperative hemiparesis caused by ischemia of the corona radiata resulting from injury to the long insular arteries. However, intraoperative identification of these perforating arteries is challenging. We attempted intra-operative motor evoked potential (MEP) monitoring under temporary occlusion of the suspected long insular artery arising from the opercular portion of middle cerebral artery in two patients with insulo-opercular gliomas. Temporary occlusion of the artery caused decrease in MEP amplitude, which recovered after release in one patient, who had no postoperative motor deficits or ischemic lesion in the corona radiata. Temporary occlusion of the artery caused no changes in MEP amplitude, so that the artery was sacrificed for tumor removal in the other patient, who had no motor deficits but ischemic lesion was present in the corona radiata in the territory of the long insular artery sparing the descending motor pathway. These cases show that great care should be taken during surgical manipulations near the posterior part of the superior limiting sulcus to preserve the perforating branches to the corona radiata, and temporary occlusion of the branches under MEP monitoring is useful to identify the arteries supplying the pyramidal tract.
    Neurologia medico-chirurgica 10/2013; · 0.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Treatment results of glioblastoma (GB) during the last 30 years in Tohoku University were analyzed to identify any improvements in patient outcome in all 332 histologically proven cases of newly diagnosed GB treated consecutively in our department between 1982 and 2011. These 30 years was divided into 5 treatment eras, Group 1 (1982-1988, without preoperative evaluation by magnetic resonance [MR] imaging, n = 46), Group 2 (1989-1996, with preoperative MR imaging, n = 41), Group 3 (1997-1999, additionally underwent intraoperative functional brain mapping and neuronavigation system, n = 38), Group 4 (2000-August 2006, underwent 30 Gy of whole brain radiation followed by 30 Gy of extended local accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy, n = 96), and Group 5 (September 2006-2011, adjuvant usage of temozolomide [TMZ], n = 111). Overall survival (OS) was calculated from the date of surgery to the death from any cause. The median survival time/2-year OS/5-year OS of Groups 1 to 5 were 10.7 months/10.9%/0%, 17.3 months/26.2%/6.9%, 15.9 months/23.7%/5.3%, 20.1 months/34.8%/15.5%, and 20.9 months/45.5%/19.7%. The prognosis for patients with GB improved significantly after the introduction of MR imaging. Younger GB, defined as patients aged below 60 years, or total tumor resection with all ages in Group 5 had 5-year 0S of 31.0% and 30.1%, respectively. The prognosis of GB was improved significantly after the introduction of TMZ for elderly GB, recursive partitioning analysis class 5, or totally resected GB. Introduction of MR imaging and TMZ, and total resection of the tumor were important in the improvement of outcome for patients with GB.
    Neurologia medico-chirurgica 10/2013; · 0.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To understand the influence of disease and treatment on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of children with brain tumors, compared to the HRQOL of children with other cancers, from the viewpoints of children and parents. A total of 133 children aged 5-18 years and 165 parents of children aged 2-18 completed questionnaires of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Cancer Module (Pain and Hurt, Nausea, Procedural Anxiety, Treatment Anxiety, Worry, Cognitive Problems, Perceived Physical Appearance, and Communication scales); higher scores indicate a better HRQOL. The Cancer Module scores, weighted by age and treatment status, were compared to those obtained in a previous study of children with other cancers (mostly leukemia). The weighted mean scores for Pain and Hurt (effect size d = 0.26) and Nausea (d = 0.23) from child reports and the scores for Nausea (d = 0.28) from parent reports were higher for children with brain tumors than scores for children with other cancers. The scores for Procedural Anxiety (d = -0.22) and Treatment Anxiety (d = -0.32) from parent reports were lower for parents of children with brain tumors than the scores for parents of children with other cancers. The child-reported Pain and Hurt score of the Cancer Module was higher (d = 0.29) and in less agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.43) with scores from the Brain Tumor Module, indicating that assessments completed with the Cancer Module misesteem pain and hurt problems in children with brain tumors. The profiles of cancer-specific HRQOL in children with brain tumors differ from those of children with other cancers; we therefore suggest that these children receive specific psychological support.
    Quality of Life Research 10/2013; · 2.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Object Maximized tumor resection and minimized surgical morbidity are extremely important in the treatment of children with malignant neuroepithelial tumors. However, the indications for repeat surgery for these tumors remain unclear. The present study investigated the clinical significance and limitations of repeat resection for these tumors. Methods This study included 61 consecutive pediatric patients with malignant neuroepithelial tumor, histologically diagnosed as WHO Grades III and IV. All patients were initially treated between January 1997 and March 2011 and had follow-up of more than 2 years. The number of surgeries, presence of leptomeningeal dissemination, survival, WHO grade, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status before and after surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Results Repeat resections were performed for 21 patients (34.4%). Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was not aggravated by surgery, even after multiple operations. The 5-year survival rates of patients who received single and repeat surgery were 58.6% and 38.7%, respectively (p = 0.12). The mean interval between initial surgery and leptomeningeal dissemination detection was 331 ± 108 days in the single-surgery group and 549 ± 122 days in the repeat-surgery group (p = 0.19). The median survival time after leptomeningeal dissemination was 580 days in the single-surgery group and 890 days in the repeat-surgery group (p = 0.74). Conclusions Repeat resection with minimized surgical morbidity is an effective method to achieve better local control of pediatric malignant neuroepithelial tumors. Leptomeningeal dissemination was a leading cause of death, but repeat surgery did not increase the frequency of death.
    Journal of Neurosurgery Pediatrics 07/2013; · 1.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A 54-year-old woman with a past history of uterine cancer developed a tumor in her right cerebellum. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast enhancement revealed a mass composed of two components, inside and outside, although both components resided in the same high-intensity area on T2-weighted imaging. Surgical resection removed the bulk of the tumor. Pathological examination revealed two distinct pathological features of the tumor-the inner major component had the features of glioblastoma whereas outer minor component had those of pilocytic astrocytoma (PA). These two components occurred with intercalating transitional areas. No genetic differences, including BRAF alteration or IDH mutations, were detected in either component. Activation of Akt, which is reported to be associated with clinically aggressive and anaplastic PA was found in the PA component of this tumor. The transitional area also stained positive, suggesting the continuity of both components. Consequently, the glioblastoma in this case was likely to have developed as a result of malignant transformation of PA. This case provides additional support for the concept of anaplastic transformation of PA.
    Brain Tumor Pathology 07/2013; · 1.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSEReports detailing the prognostic impact of TP53 mutations in medulloblastoma offer conflicting conclusions. We resolve this issue through the inclusion of molecular subgroup profiles.Patients And methodsWe determined subgroup affiliation, TP53 mutation status, and clinical outcome in a discovery cohort of 397 medulloblastomas. We subsequently validated our results on an independent cohort of 156 medulloblastomas.ResultsTP53 mutations are enriched in wingless (WNT; 16%) and sonic hedgehog (SHH; 21%) medulloblastomas and are virtually absent in subgroups 3 and 4 tumors (P < .001). Patients with SHH/TP53 mutant tumors are almost exclusively between ages 5 and 18 years, dramatically different from the general SHH distribution (P < .001). Children with SHH/TP53 mutant tumors harbor 56% germline TP53 mutations, which are not observed in children with WNT/TP53 mutant tumors. Five-year overall survival (OS; ± SE) was 41% ± 9% and 81% ± 5% for patients with SHH medulloblastomas with and without TP53 mutations, respectively (P < .001). Furthermore, TP53 mutations accounted for 72% of deaths in children older than 5 years with SHH medulloblastomas. In contrast, 5-year OS rates were 90% ± 9% and 97% ± 3% for patients with WNT tumors with and without TP53 mutations (P = .21). Multivariate analysis revealed that TP53 status was the most important risk factor for SHH medulloblastoma. Survival rates in the validation cohort mimicked the discovery results, revealing that poor survival of TP53 mutations is restricted to patients with SHH medulloblastomas (P = .012) and not WNT tumors. CONCLUSION Subgroup-specific analysis reconciles prior conflicting publications and confirms that TP53 mutations are enriched among SHH medulloblastomas, in which they portend poor outcome and account for a large proportion of treatment failures in these patients.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 07/2013; · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Glioblastoma carries a poor prognosis primarily because of its high rate of recurrence. The ability to predict the recurrence pattern and timing would be highly useful for determining effective treatment strategies. We examined the correlation between prognostic factors and the pattern of recurrence in patients with primary glioblastoma. In particular, we examined whether there was a correlation between the expression of CD133 and glioblastoma recurrence.Methods We retrospectively analyzed 112 patients with primary glioblastoma. The timing and pattern (local or distant) of the initial recurrence were obtained from medical records. To identify factors predictive of recurrence, we examined CD133 expression by Western blots and immunohistochemistry, clinical (age, sex, KPS, Ki67 labeling index, surgery, ventricular entry) and genetic (IDH1, 7p, 9p, 10q, MGMT) factors.ResultsOf the 112 patients, 99 suffered recurrence. The first recurrence was local in 77 patients and distant in 22 patients. Among the factors to predict the pattern of recurrence, CD133 expression was significantly higher in distant than in local recurrence. Of the factors to predict the timing of recurrence, high CD133 expression was associated with shorter time to distant recurrence in both univariate and multivariate analyses (P = .0011 and P = .038, respectively).Conclusions The expression of CD133 may be a predictor of the pattern and timing of recurrence of primary glioblastoma.
    Neuro-Oncology 05/2013; · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is a technique that delivers therapeutic agents directly and effectively into the brain parenchyma. Application of CED is now under investigation as a new treatment for various diseases. Diffuse brainstem glioma is one of the important candidates that could betargeted with CED. Especially when targeting brainstem lesions, prediction of drug distribution prior to CED will be necessary. This study evaluated the computational simulation of CED in the primate brainstem usinga simplified model.METHODS: Three in vivo experiments infusing gadolinium solution into the non-human primate brainstem were analyzed. T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired during infusion of a total of300 μl gadolinium solution. Computational simulation reconstructed the surface geometry of the brainstemfrom the MR images. The volume of the whole structure was meshed by grid generating software. Under the assumptions that the brainstem surface was rigid and the interior was filled with cerebrospinal fluid, the equations of continuity and Darcy’s law were solved within a computational fluid dynamics package using afinite volume method. The results of computational simulations were compared with those of the in vivo experiments.RESULTS: The distribution volume (Vd) in the simulations corresponded well with the in vivo experiments. Under the condition without massive â€~catheter back flow’, computational simulations predicted almost 70% of the Vd of the in vivo experiments.CONCLUSIONS: The simplified computational simulations were consistent with the experiments in vivo. The methodology used in this study can be applied to predict convective drug distribution in the primatebrainstem.
    Neurological Research 05/2013; · 1.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: CASE REPORT: A 3-year-old boy with Williams syndrome associated with supravalvular aortic stenosis was admitted to our hospital with disturbance of consciousness and a 2-month history of truncal ataxia. T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with contrast medium showed a heterogeneously enhanced tumor in the right cerebellum with severe hydrocephalus. The patient underwent tumor resection via suboccipital craniotomy. At the end of resection of the tumor, sudden cardiac arrest occurred after ST segment elevation. Despite immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the patient died. Histological examination of the cerebellar tumor revealed that the tumor consisted of monomorphous bipolar spindle cells on a background of myxoid matrix, and angiocentric arrangement without Rosenthal fibers or eosinophilic granular body. The final diagnosis was pilomyxoid astrocytoma. CONCLUSION: This case of Williams syndrome with cerebellar pilomyxoid astrocytoma suggests the importance of investigation of the development of brain tumors and occurrence of intraoperative cardiac arrest associated with Williams syndrome.
    Child s Nervous System 04/2013; · 1.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Object The atrium of the lateral ventricle is often affected by tumors, and some patients with these tumors suffer neurological deficits, including hemiparesis after surgery. The authors of this study investigated the possible mechanisms causing the relatively high incidences of ischemic complications associated with surgery approaching the atrium of the lateral ventricle. Methods Clinical records and radiological images of 28 patients were retrospectively studied. These patients had their lateral ventricles opened at the atrium during the resection of gliomas as well as other nonbenign brain tumors, and were treated for gliomas at our tertiary referral center in the Tohoku district, Japan, between January 2008 and December 2010. Results Routine postoperative diffusion-weighted MR images obtained within 72 hours after surgery detected infarction in the periatrial/periventricular regions in 7 patients, presumably corresponding to the lateral posterior choroidal artery (LPChA) territory. Five of these 7 patients suffered neurological sequelae with varying severities. The choroid plexus at the atrium was coagulated to achieve hemostasis during the surgery in all of these patients. Detailed analysis of microangiograms revealed ventriculofugal arteries arising from the lateral ventricle. Damage of the subependymal artery that supplies the ventriculofugal arteries caused by coagulation of the choroid plexus at the atrium probably resulted in the infarction in these patients. Conclusions Neurosurgeons must be aware of the possibility of LPChA territory infarction during surgery in the atrial or periatrial regions caused by subependymal artery obstruction after manipulating or coagulating the choroid plexus near the atrium.
    Journal of Neurosurgery 03/2013; · 3.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody, has been used for the treatment of radiation necrosis. Thus far, however, there has been no definitive report on its use for the treatment of symptomatic pseudoprogression. Here we report 2 cases of successful treatment with bevacizumab for symptomatic pseudoprogression after boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was applied for recurrent malignant gliomas.Methods Two recurrent malignant gliomas received BNCT. Both cases were treated with intravenous administration of bevacizumab at the deterioration that seemed to be symptomatic pseudoprogression.ResultsThe first case was recurrent glioblastoma multiforme and the second was recurrent anaplastic oligoastrocytoma. Both cases recurred after standard chemoradiotherapy and were referred to our institute for BNCT, which is tumor-selective particle radiation. Just prior to neutron irradiation, PET with an amino acid tracer was applied in each case to confirm tumor recurrence. Both cases showed deterioration in symptoms, as well as on MRI, at intervals of 4 months and 2 months, respectively, after BNCT. For the first case, a second PET was applied in order to confirm no increase in tracer uptake. We diagnosed both cases as symptomatic pseudoprogression and started the intravenous administration of 5 mg/kg bevacizumab biweekly with 6 cycles. Both cases responded well to this, showing rapid and dramatic improvement in neuroimaging and clinical symptoms. No tumor progression was observed 8 months after BNCT.Conclusions Bevacizumab showed marked effects on symptomatic pseudoprogression after BNCT. BNCT combined with bevacizumab may prolong the survival of patients with recurrent malignant gliomas.
    Neuro-Oncology 03/2013; · 6.18 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
861 Downloads
433.08 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • Kitasato University
      • Department of Neurosurgery
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 2010–2013
    • The University of Tokyo
      • Department of Health Science and Nursing
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 2005–2013
    • Sendai City Hospital
      Sendai, Kagoshima, Japan
  • 1999–2011
    • Kohnan Hospital
      Sendai, Kagoshima, Japan
  • 1988–2011
    • Tohoku University
      • • Department of Neurosurgery
      • • Graduate School of Medicine
      Sendai-shi, Miyagi-ken, Japan
  • 1997
    • Kurume University
      Куруме, Fukuoka, Japan