L M Stoolman

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States

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Publications (65)455.16 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) is a widely available laboratory platform for the evaluation of plasma cell (PC) neoplasms. We assess the performance of a nine-color MFC assay that uses stain-lyse-fix processing of bone marrow aspirates, minimal wash steps, and high acquisition rates with analysis of up to 1.8 x 10(6) cells. Methods: MFC results were compared with microscopic examinations, immunohistochemical studies, and serum/urine M-protein measurements from patients with documented or suspected PC neoplasms. Results: Sensitivity exceeded that of microscopic examinations, with or without immunohistochemistry. In patients with PC myeloma, clonal PC detection by MFC fell in concert with M-protein levels. However, in a subset of patients, MFC detected clonal PCs after serum/urine studies turned negative. Conclusions: The nine-color analytic cocktail eliminates duplication of PC gating reagents required for evaluation of the same epitopes using a five- or six-color approach. Fewer analytic cocktails result in lower instrument acquisition times per case, a significant factor for the large data sets required for optimal residual disease assessment. Finally, concurrent analysis of nine epitopes and two light scatter parameters aids detection of residual disease, particularly when it is mixed with polyclonal PCs.
    American Journal of Clinical Pathology 09/2014; 142(3):398-410. DOI:10.1309/AJCPO5GQPXF8QCEC · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Clinical flow cytometry typically involves the sequential interpretation of two-dimensional histograms, usually culled from six or more cellular characteristics, following initial selection (gating) of cell populations based on a different subset of these characteristics. We examined the feasibility of instead treating gated n-parameter clinical flow cytometry data as objects embedded in n-dimensional space using principles of information geometry via a recently described method known as Fisher Information Non-parametric Embedding (FINE). After initial selection of relevant cell populations through an iterative gating strategy, we converted four color (six-parameter) clinical flow cytometry datasets into six-dimensional probability density functions, and calculated differences among these distributions using the Kullback-Leibler divergence (a measurement of relative distributional entropy shown to be an appropriate approximation of Fisher information distance in certain types of statistical manifolds). Neighborhood maps based on Kullback-Leibler divergences were projected onto two dimensional displays for comparison. These methods resulted in the effective unsupervised clustering of cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia from cases of expansion of physiologic B-cell precursors (hematogones) within a set of 54 patient samples. The treatment of flow cytometry datasets as objects embedded in high-dimensional space (as opposed to sequential two-dimensional analyses) harbors the potential for use as a decision-support tool in clinical practice or as a means for context-based archiving and searching of clinical flow cytometry data based on high-dimensional distribution patterns contained within stored list mode data. Additional studies will be needed to further test the effectiveness of this approach in clinical practice.
    Cytometry Part B Clinical Cytometry 01/2009; 76(1):1-7. DOI:10.1002/cyto.b.20435 · 2.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have previously reported that local tumor irradiation, without inducing cell death, can augment the therapeutic efficacy of intratumoral (IT) dendritic cell (DC) vaccination. This study examined potential mechanisms underlying radiation enhancement of IT DC therapy in this setting. Even though ionizing radiation did not mediate tumor cell killing, bone marrow-derived DCs acquired in vitro tumor antigens from irradiated D5 murine melanoma cells more efficiently than from untreated cells. This radiation-enhanced loading of DCs did not induce DC maturation, but was associated with improved cross-priming of T cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, in vivo pulsing of DCs with irradiated versus untreated tumor cells resulted in superior presentation of tumor antigens to T cells. In addition, tumor irradiation facilitated homing of IT administered DCs to the draining lymph node, possibly by down-regulating CCL21 expression within the tumor mass. Studies of the tumor microenvironment in irradiated versus untreated tumors did not reveal significant inflammatory changes. Moreover, radiation did not promote accumulation of CD4 or CD8 effector T cells within solid tumors. Our results indicate that, without inducing cytotoxicity, tumor irradiation can enhance the ability of DCs to capture tumor antigens, migrate to the draining lymph node, and present processed antigens to T cells. These findings may prove useful in designing future strategies for human cancer immunotherapy.
    Journla of Immunotherapy 06/2008; 31(4):345-58. DOI:10.1097/CJI.0b013e318163628c · 3.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have previously described the antitumor reactivity of tumor-draining lymph node (TDLN) cells after secondary activation with antibodies. In this report, we examined the effects of interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18 on modulating the immune function of antibody-activated murine TDLN cells. TDLN cells were activated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody followed by stimulation with IL-12 and/or IL-18. IL-18 in combination with IL-12 showed a synergistic effect in augmenting IFNgamma and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor secretion, whereas IL-18 alone had minimal effect. Concurrently, IL-18 prevented IL-12-stimulated TDLN cells from producing IL-10. The IL-12/IL-18-cultured TDLN cells therefore manifested cytokine responses skewed towards a Th1/Tc1 pattern. IL-12 and IL-18 stimulated CD4(+) TDLN cells and enhanced IFNgamma production by CD4(+) cells to a greater extent than by CD8(+) cells. Use of NF-kappaB p50(-/-) TDLN cells suggested the involvement of NF-kappaB in the IL-12/IL-18 polarization effect. Furthermore, a specific NF-kappaB inhibitor significantly suppressed IL-12/IL-18-induced IFNgamma secretion, thus confirming the requirement for NF-kappaB activation in IL-12/IL-18 signaling. In adoptive immunotherapy, IL-12- and IL-18-cultured TDLN cells infiltrated pulmonary tumor nodules and eradicated established tumor metastases more efficiently than T cells generated with IL-12 or IL-18 alone. Antibody depletion revealed that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells were involved in the tumor rejection induced by IL-12/IL-18-cultured TDLN cells. These studies indicate that IL-12 and IL-18 can be used to generate potent CD4(+) and CD8(+) antitumor effector cells by synergistically polarizing antibody-activated TDLN cells towards a Th1 and Tc1 phenotype.
    Cancer Research 03/2005; 65(3):1063-70. · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Adoptive cellular immunotherapy treats metastatic cancer by infusing cultured T cells derived from resected tumors or primed lymph nodes. The infused cells must accumulate in metastatic lesions to suppress growth; however, this process and the resulting clinical response are dynamic and evolve during the days and weeks following cell infusion. This study used novel experimental techniques to determine the fate of infused, cultured tumor-draining lymph node (TDLN) cells during the treatment of murine pulmonary micrometastases. After infusion, the cultured TDLN cells accumulated in the pulmonary vasculature, systemic lymph nodes, and spleen. Donor cells were initially confined to alveolar capillaries with no movement into metastases. Within 4 h, TDLN cells began migrating across pulmonary postcapillary venules and first appeared within metastases. After 24 h, most donor cells in the lung were associated with tumor nodules. Donor cell proliferation within the lung and lymphoid organs was detected within 24 h of infusion and continued throughout the 5-day period of observation. Furthermore, those proliferating in lymphoid organs trafficked back to the tumor-bearing lungs, accounting for approximately 50% of the donor cells recovered from these sites after 5 days. Finally, donor T cells entering metastases both early (within 1-2 days) and late (after 2 days) suppressed tumor growth, but the early recruits accounted for most of the therapeutic response. Thus, cultured TDLN cells migrate directly into tumor-bearing organs and seed the recirculating pool of lymphocytes after infusion. Small fractions of the later differentiate in lymphoid organs and migrate into the lungs but appear less effective than effector cells in the initial bolus.
    Cancer Research 04/2004; 64(6):2183-91. · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Local, sustained delivery of cytokines at a tumor can enhance induction of antitumor immunity and may be a feasible neoadjuvant immunotherapy for breast cancer. We evaluated the ability of intratumoral poly-lactic-acid-encapsulated microspheres (PLAM) containing interleukin 12 (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in a murine model of breast cancer to generate a specific antitumor response. BALB/c mice with established MT-901 tumors underwent resection or treatment with a single intratumoral injection of PLAM containing IL-12, TNF-alpha, or GM-CSF, alone or in combination. Two weeks later, lymph nodes and spleens were harvested, activated with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and rhIL-2, and assessed for antitumor reactivity by an interferon gamma (IFNgamma) release assay. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) analysis was performed on days 2 and 5 after treatment by mechanically processing the tumors to create a single cell suspension, followed by three-color fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Intratumoral injection of cytokine-loaded PLAM significantly suppressed tumor growth, with the combination of IL-12 and TNF-alpha leading to increased infiltration by polymorphonuclear cells and CD8+ T-cells in comparison with controls. The induction of tumor-specific reactive T-cells in the nodes and spleens, as measured by IFN-gamma production, was highest with IL-12 and TNF-alpha. This treatment resulted in resistance to tumor rechallenge. A single intratumoral injection of IL-12 and TNF-alpha-loaded PLAM into a breast tumor leads to infiltration by polymorphonuclear cells and CD8+ T-cells with subsequent tumor regression. In addition, this local therapy induces specific antitumor T-cells in the lymph nodes and spleens, resulting in memory immune response.
    Annals of Surgical Oncology 03/2004; 11(2):147-56. DOI:10.1245/ASO.2004.03.022 · 3.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The severity of allergic asthma is dependent, in part, on the intensity of peribronchial inflammation. P-selectin is known to play a role in the development of allergen-induced peribronchial inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. Selective inhibitors of P-selectin-mediated leukocyte endothelial-cell interactions may therefore attenuate the inflammatory processes associated with allergic airway disease. Novel P-selectin inhibitors were created using a polyvalent polymer nanoparticle capable of displaying multiple synthetic, low molecular weight ligands. By assembling a particle that presents an array of groups, which as monomers interact with only low affinity, we created a construct that binds extremely efficiently to P-selectin. The ligands acted as mimetics of the key binding elements responsible for the high-avidity adhesion of P-selectin to the physiologic ligand, PSGL-1. The inhibitors were initially evaluated using an in vitro shear assay system in which interactions between circulating cells and P-selectin-coated capillary tubes were measured. The nanoparticles were shown to preferentially bind to selectins expressed on activated endothelial cells. We subsequently demonstrated that nanoparticles displaying P-selectin blocking arrays were functionally active in vivo, significantly reducing allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity and peribronchial eosinophilic inflammation in a murine model of asthma.
    The FASEB Journal 01/2004; 17(15):2296-8. DOI:10.1096/fj.03-0166fje · 5.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: D10.G4.1 (D10) cells, a murine conalbumin-reactive Th2 cell line, made to overexpress the beta(2) integrin LFA-1 by pharmacological manipulation or by transfection become autoreactive and are capable of inducing in vivo autoimmunity. However, whether this is specific to LFA-1 and whether overexpression of other T cell integrin molecules has the same effect are unknown. We examined the functional consequences of T cell CD49d (alpha(4) integrin) overexpression by transfecting murine CD49d cDNA into D10 cells. Similar to the LFA-1-transfected cells, the CD49d-overexpressing T cells are autoreactive and proliferate in response to APCs in an MHC class II-dependent manner in the absence of nominal Ag. Additionally, CD49d overexpression is associated with increased in vitro adhesion to endothelial cells and increased in vivo splenic homing. However, in contrast to LFA-1 overexpression, increased T cell CD49d expression is not associated with autoreactive cytotoxicity or the ability to induce in vivo autoimmunity. In addition to the novel observation that CD49d overexpression is sufficient to induce T cell autoreactivity, our results also support the hypothesis that the ability to induce in vivo autoimmunity is related to T cell cytotoxicity and not to T cell proliferation function in the D10 murine adoptive transfer model of autoimmunity.
    The Journal of Immunology 08/2003; 171(2):745-53. DOI:10.4049/jimmunol.171.2.745 · 5.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study shows that COS-7 cells transiently transfected and maintained on positively charged (trimethylamine-coated) microcarrier beads synthesize recombinant protein at higher levels and for longer periods of time than cells transfected and maintained on polystyrene flasks in monolayer culture. Sustained, high-level synthesis was observed with secreted chimeric proteins (murine E-selectin- and P-selectin-human IgM chimeras) and a secreted hematopoietic growth factor (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor). Studies with green fluorescent protein indicated that the transfected cells attached more firmly to the trimethylamine-coated microcarriers than to polystyrene flasks. After 10-14 days in culture, most of the transfected cells detached from the surface of the polystyrene flasks, whereas most transfected cells remained attached to the microcarriers. The transiently transfected microcarrier cultures produced higher levels of protein per transfected cell due to this prolonged attachment. The prolonged attachment and higher output of transfected cells on microcarriers resulted in a 5-fold increase in protein production from a single transfection over two weeks. Thus, microcarrier-based transient transfection yields quantities of recombinant proteins with a significant savings of time and reagents over monolayer culture.
    Biotechnology Progress 02/2003; 19(1):9-13. DOI:10.1021/bp020092r · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study characterizes venous thrombosis in the mouse and examines the important role that the adhesion molecules P-selectin and E-selectin and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) play in the thrombotic process. C57BL/6 (wild-type) mice in a natural history protocol (Phase I) and gene-targeted (KO) mice for P-selectin, E-selectin, P/E-selectin, and IL-10 in a follow-up protocol (Phase II) were studied. Inferior vena caval thrombosis was produced by ligation just below the renal veins, and mice were sacrificed and evaluated at various time points up to 12 days later. Phase I: A significant increase in neutrophils on day 2 and in monocytes on day 6 postthrombosis was found in ligated vs sham animals. An associated significant increase in vein wall P-selectin mRNA (6 h, day 2) and an increase in protein (6 h through day 6) were found, while E-selectin mRNA was significantly increased (day 2 through day 6), with a smaller increase in E-selectin protein. IL-10 mRNA increased significantly later (day 2 through day 9), with the values increasing progressively. A positive correlation existed (r = 0.77) between neutrophils and thrombosis at day 2. PHASE II: The E-selectin and P/E-selectin double-KO mice showed the least thrombus at day 2 vs wild-type clotted mice, P < 0.01. Additionally, P/E-KO mice demonstrated the lowest inflammatory cell extravasation into the vein wall at day 2. This study demonstrates an acute to chronic inflammatory response in the vein wall associated with venous thrombosis. Inhibition of selectins decreased thrombus formation.
    Journal of Surgical Research 12/2002; 108(2):212-21. DOI:10.1006/jsre.2002.6552 · 2.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: CCR6 is expressed by memory T cells (mTC) and is a requirement for efficient arrest of a subset of mTC to activated human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) under physiologic shear stress. We now address whether CCR6 alone is sufficient to induce arrest of a model T cell line (Jurkat) that shows low expression of all CCRs tested (CCR1-10). Herein, we transduced Jurkat (JK) T cells expressing fucosyltransferase VII with a chimeric chemokine receptor consisting of CCR6 fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein. In contrast to the starting JK lines, the resulting cell line (JK fucosyltransferase VII-CCR6) migrated 6-fold better to CCL20 in chemotaxis assays, arrested in response to CCL20 that was immobilized to plastic, and demonstrated a 2.5-fold increase in adhesion to activated HDMEC (p = 0.001). Adhesion was blocked by anti-CD18 mAb (p = 0.005) but not by anti-CD49d mAb (p = 0.3). After arrest on recombinant substrates, CCR6 clustered on the surface as detected by real-time observation of enhanced green fluorescent protein fluorescence. Dual-label confocal microscopy revealed that LFA-1 (CD18 and CD11a), but not CXCR4, colocalized with clustered CCR6 in the presence of immobilized CCL20. Thus, the functional expression of CCR6 is sufficient to provide the chemokine signaling necessary to induce arrest of a JK T cell line to activated HDMEC. Clustering of CCR6 and coassociation with critical integrins may serve to strengthen adhesion between T cells and activated endothelial cells.
    The Journal of Immunology 10/2002; 169(5):2346-53. DOI:10.4049/jimmunol.169.5.2346 · 5.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We previously demonstrated induction and expression of CD62E and CD62P in the lungs of mice primed and then challenged with intratracheal (i.t.) SRBC. The current study examined accumulation of endogenous lymphocytes in the lungs of endothelial E- and P-selectin-deficient (E(-)P(-)) mice after i.t. SRBC challenge. Compared with syngeneic wild-type (wt) mice, E(-)P(-) mice showed an 85-95% decrease in CD8(+) T cells and B cells in the lungs at both early and late time points. In contrast, CD4(+) T cell accumulation was reduced by approximately 60% early, but equivalent to wt levels later. Surprisingly, many gammadelta T cells were found in lungs and blood of E(-)P(-) mice but were undetectable in the lungs and blood of wt mice. Absolute numbers of peripheral blood CD4, CD8, and B lymphocytes in E(-)P(-) mice equaled or exceeded the levels in wt mice, particularly after challenge. Trafficking studies using alphabeta T lymphoblasts confirmed that the recruitment of circulating cells after challenge was markedly reduced in E(-)P(-) mice. Furthermore, Ag priming occurred normally in both the selectin-deficient and wt mice, because primed lymphocytes from both groups transferred Ag sensitivity into naive wt mice. Lung production of mRNA for six CC and two CXC chemokines after challenge was equivalent by RT-PCR analysis in wt and E(-)P(-) mice. Therefore, reduced lung accumulation of alphabeta T cells and B cells in E(-)P(-) mice did not result from reduced delivery of circulating lymphocytes to the lungs, unsuccessful Ag priming, or defective pulmonary chemokine production. Selectin-dependent lymphocyte recruitment into the lungs following i.t.-SRBC challenge is subset specific and time dependent.
    The Journal of Immunology 10/2002; 169(5):2570-9. DOI:10.4049/jimmunol.169.5.2570 · 5.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies reported that L-selectin (CD62L) on human peripheral blood neutrophils serves as an E-selectin ligand. This study shows that CD62L acquired E-selectin-binding activity following phorbol ester (PMA) treatment of the Jurkat T cell line and anti-CD3/IL-2-driven proliferation of human T lymphocytes in vitro. The recombinant porcine E-selectin/human Ig chimera P11.4 showed neuraminidase-sensitive and calcium-dependent attachment to PMA-stimulated human Jurkat T cells in a flow cytometry assay. The anti-CD62L mAb (DREG 56) blocked this binding interaction by approximately 60% and P11.4 precipitated CD62L from detergent lysates of PMA-activated Jurkat cells. In contrast, P11.4 precipitated minimal amounts of CD62L from detergent lysates of nonactivated human PBL. As reported previously, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 and a distinct 130-kDa glycoprotein were the major species in these precipitates. However, T cell activation on plate-immobilized anti-CD3 and growth in low-dose IL-2 increased the percentage of CD62L molecules with E-selectin-binding activity. After two cycles of activation and culture, approximately 60-70% of the CD62L was precipitated with the P11.4 chimera. These cultured T lymphoblasts rolled avidly on both E-selectin and P-selectin at physiologic levels of linear shear stress. The DREG 56 Ab partially blocked rolling on the E-selectin substrate, whereas no effect was seen on P-selectin. Thus, CD62L on human cultured T lymphoblasts is one of several glycoproteins that interacts directly with E-selectin and contributes to rolling under flow.
    The Journal of Immunology 09/2002; 169(4):1768-73. DOI:10.4049/jimmunol.169.4.1768 · 5.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Peribronchial inflammation contributes to the pathophysiology of allergic asthma. In many vascular beds, adhesive interactions between leukocytes and the endothelial surface initiate the recruitment of circulating cells. Previous studies using OVA-induced airway hyperreactivity indicated that P-selectin, a member of the selectin family expressed by activated platelets and endothelium, contributed to both inflammation and bronchoconstriction. The current study used cockroach allergen (CRA), an allergen that induces asthmatic responses in both humans and mice, to further investigate the role of selectins in the development of peribronchial inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. P- and E-selectin mRNAs were detected in extracts of CRA-sensitized animals beginning shortly after intratracheal challenge with CRA. The P-selectin mRNA was transiently induced at early time points while up-regulation of the E-selectin mRNA was more prolonged. Mice with targeted deletions in E-selectin (E(-)), P-selectin (P(-)), and both genes (E(-)/P(-)) showed 70-85% reductions in airway hyperreactivity, peribronchial inflammation, and eosinophil accumulation. The P(-) and E(-)/P(-) groups showed the most profound reductions. The transfer of splenic lymphocytes from CRA-primed E(-)/P(-) into naive wild-type (WT) mice produced the same level of airway hyperreactivity as transfers from CRA-primed WT into naive WT hosts, indicating that peripheral immunization was similar. The observed changes in the selectin-deficient animals were not related to inadequate sensitization, because CRA priming and challenge increased serum IgE levels. Furthermore, pulmonary Th2-type cytokines and chemokines in the E-selectin(-/-) and WT animals were similar. The findings indicate that both P- and E-selectin contribute to CRA-induced peribronchial inflammation and airway hyperreactivity.
    The Journal of Immunology 09/2002; 169(4):2120-5. DOI:10.4049/jimmunol.169.4.2120 · 5.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Core 2 O-glycans terminated with sialyl-Lewis x (sLe(X)) are functionally important oligosaccharides that endow particular macromolecules with high-affinity glycan ligands for the selectin family. To date, antibodies that recognize these structures on leukocytes have not been described. We characterize such a monoclonal antibody (mAb) here (CHO-131). The binding specificity of CHO-131 was directly examined by means of synthetic glycopeptides containing precise O-glycan structures. CHO-131 bound to sLe(X) extended from a core 2 branch (C2-O-sLe(X)), but CHO-131 demonstrated no reactivity if this oligosaccharide lacked fucose or if sLe(X) was extended from a core 1 branch. Using transfected cell lines, we found that CHO-131 binding required the functional activity of the glycosyltransferases alpha2,3-sialyltransferase, alpha1,3-fucosyltransferase-VII, and core 2 beta1,6 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (C2GnT). The C2-O-sLe(X) motif occurs primarily on sialomucins and has been directly shown to contribute to high-affinity P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 binding by P-selectin. Indeed, CHO-131 staining of neutrophils was diminished following sialomucin removal by O-glycoprotease, and its reactivity with transfected hematopoietic cell lines correlated with the expression of P-selectin ligands. CHO-131 also stained a small population of lymphocytes that were primarily CD3(+), CD4(+), and CD45RO(+) and represented a subset (37.8% +/- 18.3%) of cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA) T cells, distinguished by the mAb HECA-452, which detects sLe(X)-related glycans. Unlike anti-sLe(X) mAbs, CHO-131 binding also indicates C2GnT activity and demonstrates that CLA T cells are heterogeneous based on the glycan structures they synthesize. These findings support evidence that differential C2GnT activity results in T-cell subsets that express ligands for E-selectin, P-selectin, or both.
    Blood 07/2002; 99(11):4063-9. DOI:10.1182/blood-2001-12-0265 · 9.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Leukocyte interactions with vascular endothelium are an initial step for leukocyte entry into infectious foci where endothelial selectins may play a key role. Infiltrating leukocyte is essential for bacterial clearance, suggesting that endothelial selectins would be important in host defense against microorganisms. To address this, E-, P-, and E/P-selectin-deficient mice (E(-/-), P(-/-), E/P(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) mice underwent cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Neither leukocyte infiltration nor bacterial load in the peritoneum was altered in E(-/-), P(-/-), and E/P(-/-) mice compared to WT mice. However, E(-/-), P(-/-), and E/P(-/-) mice were resistant to the lethality induced by CLP. At the mechanistic level, E(-/-), P(-/-), and E/P(-/-) mice did not develop renal dysfunction, a possible cause of death during sepsis. The serum level of interleukin-13 in E(-/-), P(-/-), and E/P(-/-) mice that had undergone CLP was higher than that in WT mice, whereas levels of macrophage inflammatory protein-2, KC in serum, and KC in kidney were lower than those in WT mice. These experiments demonstrate that endothelial selectin-mediated leukocyte rolling is not required for leukocyte entry in septic peritonitis and that endothelial selectins may affect mice survival during sepsis by influencing the cytokine profiles.
    Experimental and Molecular Pathology 03/2002; 72(1):68-76. DOI:10.1006/exmp.2001.2416 · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tumor-draining lymph node (TDLN) cells develop substantial antitumor activity after activation on immobilized alphaCD3 and culture in low-dose IL-2. This study found that the minor subset of TDLN T cells expressing binding sites for the adhesion receptor P-selectin (Plig(high) T cells) produced T lymphoblasts with the most tumor-specific IFN-gamma synthesis in vitro and antitumor activity following adoptive transfer in vivo. The Plig(high) T cells constituted <25% of the cells with the phenotype of recently activated cells including high levels of CD69, CD44, or CD25, and low levels of CD62L. The cultured Plig(high) TDLN were 10- to 20-fold more active against established pulmonary micrometastases than cultured unfractionated TDLN, and >30-fold more active than cultured TDLN cells depleted of the Plig(high) fraction before expansion (Plig(low) cells). Tumor-specific IFN-gamma synthesis in vitro paralleled the antitumor activities of the cultured fractions in vivo, implying that increased Tc1 and Th1 effector functions contributed to the tumor suppression. Neither nonspecific interaction with the P-selectin chimera used for sorting nor endogenous costimulatory activity in the Plig(high) fraction accounted for the marked increase in antitumor activities after culture. The cultured Plig(high) fraction contained a variety of potential effector cells; however, the CD8 and CD4 subsets of alphabeta T cells accounted for 95-97% of its antitumor activity. The authors propose that P-selectin sorting increased antitumor activities by concentrating Tc1 and Th1 pre-effector/effector cells before culture.
    The Journal of Immunology 09/2001; 167(6):3089-98. DOI:10.4049/jimmunol.167.6.3089 · 5.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The classification of CD5-negative/CD10-negative chronic B-cell leukemias (CD5-/CD10- CBL) can be problematic. Most of these cases may represent leukemic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) other than B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (BCLL); nonetheless, some investigators still advocate the term "CD5-negative BCLL." Because adhesion molecule (AdMol) expression patterns reflect the biology of lymphoid neoplasms, we studied a series of 106 B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders, including CD5+ BCLL (n = 56), NHL other than BCLL (n = 35), and CD5-/CD10- CBL (excluding hairy cell leukemia and prolymphocytic leukemia) with no prior history of NHL (n = 15) for expression of components of the very late antigen-4 complex (alpha4/beta1 integrin (CD49d/CD29)), components of the mucosal addressin-cell adhesion molecule receptor (alpha4(CD49d)/beta7 integrin), and L-selectin (CD62L). CD62L expression was significantly greater in CD5+ BCLL than in NHL (P < .001). Conversely, CD29, CD49d, and beta7-integrin expression were significantly greater in NHL than in CD5+ BCLL (P < .001 for each marker). These differences persisted when only blood and bone marrow samples were analyzed, with the exception of differences in CD62L expression, which approached, but did not reach, statistical significance (P = .08). The group of CD5-/CD10- CBL displayed an AdMol profile similar to NHL and was significantly different than CD5+ BCLL in expression of beta7 integrin, CD29, CD49d, and CD62L (P range < .001-.011). In summary, CD5-/CD10- CBL display an AdMol profile resembling NHL and significantly different from CD5+ BCLL, supporting the growing notion that "CD5-negative BCLL" generally represents leukemic NHL rather than a variant of true CD5+ BCLL.
    Human Pathlogy 01/2001; 32(1):66-73. DOI:10.1053/hupa.2001.20891 · 2.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The adhesive interaction between lymphocytes and lung endothelial cells presents an attractive arena for the development of novel therapeutic agents to modify pathologic pulmonary immune responses. The conceptual basis for choosing molecular targets to modulate this adhesive interaction derives, in large part, from results of murine experimental model systems of the pulmonary immune response. This article reviews one such model, the response of primed C57BL/6 mice to the particulate antigen sheep erythrocytes. Novel data are presented on the effect of a blocking anti-alpha(4) integrin monoclonal antibody on lung leukocyte and lymphocyte subset accumulation after intratracheal (IT) antigen challenge. Results from this model system have indicated that lymphocytes may use either the endothelial selectins or alpha(4) integrin as independent pathways to initiate recruitment into the lungs.
    Immunopharmacology 08/2000; 48(3):223-9. DOI:10.1016/S0162-3109(00)00221-6
  • Journla of Immunotherapy 01/2000; 23(5):528-535. DOI:10.1097/00002371-200009000-00003 · 3.35 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
455.16 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1988–2014
    • University of Michigan
      • • Department of Pathology
      • • Section of Vascular Surgery
      • • Division of Pediatric Genetics
      Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • 1992–2005
    • Concordia University–Ann Arbor
      Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • 1997
    • Northwestern Memorial Hospital
      • Northwestern Medicine
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 1991
    • Harvard Medical School
      • Department of Pathology
      Boston, MA, United States