L D Jacobs

Mercy Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, United States

Are you L D Jacobs?

Claim your profile

Publications (65)500.22 Total impact

  • Neurology 05/2011; 76(22):1893. DOI:10.1212/01.wnl.0000398732.43701.48 · 8.30 Impact Factor
  • 12/2004; 6(4):144-147. DOI:10.7224/1537-2073-6.4.144
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A new liquid formulation of Avonex (interferon beta-1a [IFNbeta-1a]) in a prefilled syringe has been developed to make administration of the drug easier for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). This formulation does not contain human serum albumin (HSA), often added to interferon (IFN) products for stabilization. However, formulation changes may alter the secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures of IFNbeta products. These kinds of structural changes could lead to the formation of antibodies directed against IFNbeta. Some of these anti-IFN antibodies may neutralize the biologic activity of IFNbeta. This study was designed to determine the immunogenicity and safety of the new prefilled syringe (liquid) HSA-free formulation of Avonex in patients with relapsing MS. This was a multicenter, single-arm, open-label study. Patients with relapsing MS received liquid, HSA-free Avonex 30 microg by IM injection from a prefilled syringe once weekly for up to 24 months. Immunogenicity and safety were assessed every 3 months. Serum levels of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) were measured at baseline and every 3 months using a 2-step enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and antiviral cytopathic effect assay. A total of 153 patients (121 women, 32 men; mean [SD] age, 39.6 [9.9] years; age range, 19.0-59.0 years) were enrolled in the study. Sera were available for analysis from 125 and 119 patients after 18 and 24 months of treatment, respectively. By 18 months, 1 patient (1%) had > or =2 consecutive titers of > or =20, a level at which the persistent presence of NAbs has been shown in some studies to have clinical consequences. By 24 months, 1 additional patient (total 2%) had > or =2 consecutive titers of > or =20. At 18 months, 5 patients (4%) had > or =1 NAb titer of > or =5; at 24 months, 6 patients (5%) had > or =1 NAb titer of > or =5. The safety profile of liquid Avonex was comparable to the lyophilized form containing HSA. The prefilled syringe (liquid) HSA-free formulation of Avonex was well tolerated and showed a low level of immunogenicity. Over 24 months, 2% of patients developed persistent NAbs (> or =2 consecutive titers of > or =20).
    Clinical Therapeutics 04/2004; 26(4):511-21. DOI:10.1016/S0149-2918(04)90053-7 · 2.59 Impact Factor
  • J. H. Simon, L. Jacobs, N. Simonian
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: T1 -hypointense lesions (T1-black holes) in multiple sclerosis (MS) are areas of relatively severe central nervous system (CNS) damage compared with the more non-specific T2-hyperintense lesions, which show greater signal intensity than normal brain on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The T1-hypointense lesions are areas of axonal loss, as well as matrix disruption [1, 2]. T1-hypointense lesions are moderately correlated with focal reduction in the magnetization transfer index [3, 4] and reduced N-acetylaspartate (NAA) [2]. T1hypointense lesions appear to evolve from only a subset of prior enhancing MS lesions. Recent studies have suggested that an increase in T1-hypointense lesions is more strongly correlated with progression of disability in secondary progressive MS than T2-hyperintense lesions [5, 6]. For these reasons, the T1 -hypointense lesions are considered to be potential independent markers of the MS disease process compared with the conventional MR measures of subclinical disease — the T2-lesions, and markers of inflammation, the enhancing lesions [7, 8]. Here we summarize the analyses of T1-black holes from the MS Collaborative Research Group Trial of interferon β-1a, which provided an opportunity to determine the natural history of T1-black holes in relatively early MS, in patients with only mild-to-moderate disability, and to evaluate the potential of T1-black holes as a measure of treatment efficacy. Details of this work have been published previously [9].
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of multiple sclerosis (MS) in African American (AA) patients in the New York State Multiple Sclerosis Consortium (NYSMSC) patient registry. The NYSMSC is a group of 18 MS centers throughout New York State organized to prospectively assess clinical characteristics of MS patients. AAs comprise 6% (329) of the total NYSMSC registrants (5602). Demographics, disease course, therapy, and socioeconomic status were compared in AA registrants versus nonAfrican Americans (NAA). There was an increased female preponderance and a significantly younger age at diagnosis in the AA group. AA patients were more likely to have greater disability with increased disease duration. No differences were seen in types of MS and use of disease modifying therapies. Our findings suggest a racial influence in MS. Further genetic studies that consider race differences are warranted to elucidate mechanisms of disease susceptibility.
    Multiple Sclerosis 07/2003; 9(3):293-8. DOI:10.1191/1352458503ms909oa · 4.86 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We compared the patterns of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and the anti-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-10 (IL-10) and tumor growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) from peripheral blood of male and female patients with relapsing-remitting (RR) and secondary progressive (SP) forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). The relationships between pro-inflammatory cytokines and disability (expanded disability status scale, EDSS) were also examined. Peripheral blood anti-coagulated with heparin was obtained from 47 MS patients (30 women and 17 men) and activated with phorbol-12-myristate 13 acetate (PMA) and ionomycin in the presence of brefeldin A and stained for flow cytometry with fluorescently labeled antibodies against intracellular IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10. The T cells were delineated with peridinin chlorophyll protein (Per-CP) labeled anti-CD3 antibody. The stained samples were analyzed on a flow cytometer to assess the intracellular pro-inflammatory cytokine patterns. The levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and tumor growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) were measured in plasma using enzyme-linked immunoassay. The percentage of TNF-alpha-producing CD3 positive cells was significantly higher (P=0.045) in men (mean+/-S.D., 39+/-13%) than in women (mean+/-S.D., 29+/-13%) RR-MS patients. The percentage of CD3 positive cells producing IFN-gamma was significantly correlated with EDSS in females but not in males (Spearman rank correlation r(S)=0.49, P=0.018). The secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, is influenced by gender in MS patients and may contribute to the sexual dimorphism of MS.
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences 06/2003; 209(1-2):93-9. DOI:10.1016/S0022-510X(03)00004-2 · 2.26 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Since there is a need for cost-effective screening techniques to identify neuropsychological impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, and because existing methods require cognitive testing with subsequent interpretation by a neuropsychologist, a brief self-report procedure was developed to screen for neuropsychological impairment in MS. In the first phase of the study, a pool of 80 items was generated based on a literature review and consultation with healthcare professionals. The set was reduced to 15 via Rasch analysis. Using these items, a brief (five minute) MS Neuropsychological Screening Questionnaire (MSNQ), including patient- and informant-report forms, was composed. In phase II, 50 MS patients and their caregivers completed the MSNQ. A comprehensive neuropsychological test battery was also administered. Analyses covered the reliability of the MSNQ and correlations between both patient- and informant-report scores and objective neuropsychological testing. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0.93 and 0.94 for the patient- and informant-report forms, respectively, and both forms of the test were strongly correlated with a more general cognitive complaints questionnaire. The patient MSNQ form correlated significantly with measures of depression but not with objective tests of cognitive function. In contrast, the informant form was correlated with patient cognitive performance but not depression. A cut-off score of 27 on the informant form of the MSNQ optimally separated patients based on a neuropsychological summary score encompassing measures of processing speed and memory. There were two false-negatives and one false-positive, giving the test a sensitivity of 0.83 and a specificity of 0.97. It is concluded, therefore, that this self-administered neuropsychological screening test is reliable and predicts neuropsychological impairment in MS patients with a reasonable degree of accuracy.
    Multiple Sclerosis 03/2003; 9(1):95-101. DOI:10.1191/1352458503ms861oa · 4.86 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this work was to assess the effect of interferon beta-1a (Avonex) on the rate of development of clinically definite multiple sclerosis and brain magnetic resonance imaging changes in subgroups based on type of presenting event, baseline brain magnetic resonance imaging parameters, and demographic factors in the Controlled High-Risk Subjects Avonex Multiple Sclerosis Prevention Study (CHAMPS) trial. After the onset of a first demyelinating event, 383 patients with brain magnetic resonance imaging evidence of subclinical demyelination were treated with corticosteroids and randomly assigned to receive weekly intramuscular injections of 30 microg interferon beta-1a or placebo. The treatment effect within subgroups was assessed in proportional hazards models both for the development of clinically definite multiple sclerosis and for a combined outcome of development of clinically definite multiple sclerosis or >1 new or enlarging T2 lesions on brain magnetic resonance imaging. A beneficial effect of treatment was noted in all subgroups evaluated. Adjusted rate ratios for the development of clinically definite multiple sclerosis in the optic neuritis, brainstem-cerebellar, and spinal cord syndrome subgroups were 0.58 (p = 0.05), 0.40 (p = 0.03), and 0.30 (p = 0.01) and for the development of the combined clinically definite multiple sclerosis/magnetic resonance imaging outcome were 0.50 (p < 0.001), 0.41 (p = 0.001), and 0.40 (p = 0.004), respectively. A treatment benefit on both outcome measures also was seen in subgroups based on baseline brain magnetic resonance imaging parameters, gender, and age. Interferon beta-1a is beneficial when initiated at the first clinical demyelinating event in patients with brain magnetic resonance imaging evidence of subclinical demyelination. The beneficial effect is present for optic neuritis, brainstem-cerebellar syndromes, and spinal cord syndromes.
    Annals of Neurology 05/2002; 51(4):481-90. · 11.91 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this work was to assess the effect of interferon β-1a (Avonex®) on the rate of development of clinically definite multiple sclerosis and brain magnetic resonance imaging changes in subgroups based on type of presenting event, baseline brain magnetic resonance imaging parameters, and demographic factors in the Controlled High-Risk Subjects Avonex Multiple Sclerosis Prevention Study (CHAMPS) trial. After the onset of a first demyelinating event, 383 patients with brain magnetic resonance imaging evidence of subclinical demyelination were treated with corticosteroids and randomly assigned to receive weekly intramuscular injections of 30μg interferon β-1a or placebo. The treatment effect within subgroups was assessed in proportional hazards models both for the development of clinically definite multiple sclerosis and for a combined outcome of development of clinically definite multiple sclerosis or >1 new or enlarging T2 lesions on brain magnetic resonance imaging. A beneficial effect of treatment was noted in all subgroups evaluated. Adjusted rate ratios for the development of clinically definite multiple sclerosis in the optic neuritis, brainstem–cerebellar, and spinal cord syndrome subgroups were 0.58 (p = 0.05), 0.40 (p = 0.03), and 0.30 (p = 0.01) and for the development of the combined clinically definite multiple sclerosis/magnetic resonance imaging outcome were 0.50 (p < 0.001), 0.41 (p = 0.001), and 0.40 (p = 0.004), respectively. A treatment benefit on both outcome measures also was seen in subgroups based on baseline brain magnetic resonance imaging parameters, gender, and age. Interferon β-1a is beneficial when initiated at the first clinical demyelinating event in patients with brain magnetic resonance imaging evidence of subclinical demyelination. The beneficial effect is present for optic neuritis, brainstem–cerebellar syndromes, and spinal cord syndromes.
    Annals of Neurology 04/2002; 51(4):481 - 490. DOI:10.1002/ana.10148 · 11.91 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Brain atrophy has emerged as a useful surrogate marker of disease involvement in multiple sclerosis (MS). The relationship between whole-brain or regional atrophy and cognitive dysfunction is poorly understood. To determine whether the bicaudate ratio (BCR)-the minimum intercaudate distance divided by brain width along the same line-is increased in MS and to compare the ability of the BCR, whole-brain atrophy, and other magnetic resonance imaging markers to predict cognitive dysfunction. Case-control study. University-affiliated clinic. Sixty patients with MS and 50 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Bicaudate ratio, whole-brain atrophy, T2 lesion load, T1 ("black hole") lesion load, and caudate volume were measured quantitatively using fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, T1-weighted, and gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging scans. Symbol Digit Modalities Test was used to assess cognitive function. The BCR (mean [SD]) was higher in patients with MS (0.11 [0.03]) than in controls (0.09 [0.02]) (P<.001), suggesting subcortical atrophy in MS. The BCR was related to total T2 (r = 0.56, P<.001) and T1 (r = 0.40, P<.002) lesion volumes, but not caudate volume in patients with MS. Regression modeling selected BCR (P<.05), but not whole-brain atrophy, T1 or T2 lesion volume, or caudate volume as predictive of Symbol Digit Modalities Test score in patients with MS. The BCR is increased in MS and is more closely associated with cognitive dysfunction than are other magnetic resonance imaging surrogate markers including whole-brain atrophy. Increased BCR is best explained by frontal horn ventricular enlargement due to atrophy of deep frontal subcortical white matter. This highlights the close relationship between subcortical atrophy and cognitive impairment in patients with MS.
    JAMA Neurology 03/2002; 59(2):275-80. DOI:10.1001/archneur.59.2.275 · 7.01 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: While gray matter T2 hypointensity in multiple sclerosis (MS) has been associated with physical disability and clinical course, previous studies have relied on visual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessments. To quantitatively determine if T2 hypointensity is associated with conventional MRI and clinical findings in MS. Case-control study. University-affiliated community-based hospital. Sixty patients with MS and 50 controls. T2 intensities of the substantia nigra, red nucleus, thalamus, putamen, globus pallidus, and caudate; third ventricular width; total brain T1 (hypointense) and T2 (hyperintense) lesion volumes; Expanded Disability Status Scale (physical disability) score; and disease course. Deep gray matter T2 hypointensity was present in patients with MS in all structures (P<.005) except for the substantia nigra. T2 hypointensity was associated with third ventricle enlargement and higher T2 but not T1 plaque load. The regression model predicting third ventricle width included caudate T2 hypointensity (P =.006). The model predicting T2 lesion load included globus pallidus T2 hypointensity (P =.001). Caudate T2 hypointensity was the only variable associated with disability score in regression modeling (P =.03). All T2 hypointensities differentiated the secondary progressive from the relapsing-remitting clinical courses. The final model (P<.001) predicting clinical course retained T2 hypointensity of the thalamus, caudate, and putamen but not MRI plaques or atrophy. Gray matter T2 hypointensity in MS is associated with brain atrophy and is a stronger predictor of disability and clinical course than are conventional MRI findings. While longitudinal studies are warranted, these results suggest that pathologic iron deposition is a surrogate marker of the destructive disease process.
    JAMA Neurology 01/2002; 59(1):62-8. DOI:10.1001/archneur.59.1.62 · 7.01 Impact Factor
  • Neurology 01/2002; 57(12 Suppl 5):S25-30. DOI:10.1212/WNL.49.2.358 · 8.30 Impact Factor
  • J H Simon, L Jacobs, R P Kinkel
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A pattern of injury observed in patients at high risk for MS described as transcallosal bands (TCB) is hypothesized to be the result of neuronal tract degeneration in earliest MS, extending from typical acute, focal demyelinating lesions located along the lateral borders of the corpus callosum. The TCB, a T2-hyperintense lesion traversing the corpus callosum is recognized on 3-mm thick, T2-weighted imaging, develops over months and persists over years.
    Neurology 12/2001; 57(10):1888-90. DOI:10.1212/WNL.57.10.1888 · 8.30 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To use DNA arrays to identify differences in gene expression associated with relapsing–remitting (RR) MS.Methods: Total RNA was isolated from monocyte depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 15 RR MS patients and 15 age- and sex-matched controls. The RNA was reverse transcribed to radiolabeled cDNA and the resultant cDNA was used to probe a DNA array containing over 4000 named human genes. The binding of radiolabeled cDNA to the probes on the array was measured by phosphorimager.Results: Of more than 4000 genes tested, only 34 were significantly different in RR-MS patients from controls. Of these, 25 were significantly increased and 9 significantly decreased in the RR MS patients. Twelve of these genes have inflammatory and/or immunological functions that could be relevant to the MS disease process. The potentially relevant genes that were elevated (15% to 28%) were P protein, LCK, cAMP responsive element modulator, IL-7 receptor, matrix metalloproteinase-19, M130 antigen, and peptidyl–prolyl isomerase. Those that were significantly decreased (15% to 35%) were SAS transmembrane 4 superfamily protein, STRL22 (C–C chemokine receptor 6), AFX protein, DNA fragmentation factor-45 and immunoglobulin gamma 3 (Gm marker).Conclusions: The RR-MS disease effect was relatively restricted and most of the mRNAs tested were not different from the normal controls. However, there were significant differences identified in the expression of a subset of mRNAs, including 13 with inflammatory/immune functions that could be relevant to MS. The systematic use of DNA arrays can provide insight into the dynamic cellular pathways involved in MS pathogenesis and its phenotypic heterogeneity.
    Journal of Neuroimmunology 07/2001; DOI:10.1016/S0165-5728(01)00308-3 · 2.79 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Autopsy studies showed cortical and juxtacortical multiple sclerosis (MS) plaques. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) is an advanced magnetic resonance imaging sequence that reveals tissue T2 prolongation with cerebrospinal fluid suppression, allowing detection of superficial brain lesions. To assess FLAIR, T1-weighted, and T2-weighted images for detecting lesions in or near the cerebral cortex in patients with MS and to explore the relation between cortical lesions and cortical atrophy. Cross-sectional study in a university MS clinic of 84 patients with MS and 66 age-matched healthy controls receiving 1.5-T fast FLAIR, T2-weighted, and T1-weighted images. Regional cortical atrophy was rated vs controls. Cortical and juxtacortical lesions were ovoid hyperintensities involving the cortex and/or gray-white junction. A total of 810 cortical and juxtacortical lesions were seen by FLAIR in patients (mean, 9.6 per patient), most commonly in the superior frontal lobe. Cortical and juxtacortical lesions were identified in 72 patients and 6 controls. Fourteen percent of cortical and juxtacortical lesions were seen on T1-weighted images and 26% were seen on T2-weighted images. More cortical and juxtacortical lesions were present in secondary progressive disease than relapsing-remitting disease. The total number of cortical and juxtacortical lesions correlated significantly with disease duration and the regional number correlated with the degree of regional atrophy. After taking into account noncortical (white matter) lesions, only the cortical and juxtacortical lesion count predicted atrophy in that region. FLAIR can detect many cortical and juxtacortical lesions in MS, which were appreciated previously in autopsy studies but usually missed by magnetic resonance imaging during life. Cortical and juxtacortical plaque formation may contribute to cortical atrophy in MS.
    JAMA Neurology 06/2001; 58(5):742-8. DOI:10.1001/archneur.58.5.742 · 7.01 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Brain atrophy may occur early in the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) and may be associated with disability. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 114 MS patients (group A) were analyzed for regional atrophy (vs age-/gender-matched controls) and T1 and T2 lesions using 4-point rating systems. Thirty-five separate patients (group B) were analyzed for cortical atrophy (ordinal scale), third ventricular width, and total T2 hyperintense lesion volume (computer assisted). In group A, regression modeling indicated that inferior frontal atrophy (P = .0003) and T2 lesions in the pons (P = .02) predicted physical disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS] score). Secondary progressive (SP) versus relapsing patients were predicted by inferior parietal (P = .002), superior parietal (P = .006), temporal (P = .008), inferior frontal (P = .01), superior frontal (P = .01), cerebellum (P = .01), occipital (P = .01), and midbrain (P = .02) atrophy. SP patients were also predicted by total atrophy (P = .01) and third ventricular enlargement (P = .03) but not T1 or T2 lesions. In group B, the regression model predicting EDSS score included only superior frontal atrophy (r = 0.515, P = .002). Mean kappa coefficients of ordinal ratings were 0.9 (intraobserver) and 0.8 (interobserver). Ordinal ratings correlated well with quantitative assessments. The authors conclude that brain atrophy is closely associated with physical disability and clinical course in MS patients and can be appreciated using a semiquantitative MRI regional rating system.
    Journal of Neuroimaging 05/2001; 11(2):129-36. DOI:10.1111/j.1552-6569.2001.tb00022.x · 1.82 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cortical and subcortical gray matter hypointensities on T2-weighted MR images (T2WI) occur commonly in MS brains and have been related to disease duration, clinical course, and the level of neurologic disability. These hypointensities have been reported to occur in the thalamus, basal ganglia, and rolandic cortex. We assessed whether T2 hypointensity is associated with the severity of white matter plaques and atrophy of MS brains. In 114 MS patients, hypointensity of the thalamus, putamen, caudate, and sensorimotor cortex was ordinally rated against age- and gender-matched normal controls on 1.5-T MRI fast spin-echo axial T2WI. Regional and global T2 hyperintense and T1 hypointense parenchymal lesion loads were ordinally rated. Enlargement of subarachnoid and ventricular spaces (atrophy) was ordinally rated vs. age- and gender-matched normal controls. T2 hypointensity was highly, positively correlated with many other MRI variables. Regression modeling showed that T2 hypointensity was related to total atrophy, total T2 lesion load, third ventricular enlargement, parietal atrophy, and to a lesser extent, frontal T1 lesions and cerebellar T2 lesions, but not related to gadolinium enhancement. Ordinal ratings of T2 lesions and central atrophy showed high correlations with quantitative computerized assessments. We conclude that gray matter hypointensity on T2WI may reflect pathologic iron deposition and brain degeneration in MS. This T2 hypointensity is associated with brain atrophy and other MR markers of tissue damage. Further study is warranted to determine if T2 hypointensity is predictive of disease course in MS and is a useful surrogate outcome measure in therapeutic trials.
    Journal of the Neurological Sciences 04/2001; 185(1):19-26. DOI:10.1016/S0022-510X(01)00477-4 · 2.26 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Previous studies of personality change in multiple sclerosis (MS) relied on brief, nonstandardized assessments or tests that are confounded with symptoms of acute psychiatric disorder. Objectives of the present study were to evaluate character change in MS by using comprehensive trait measures of personality and to determine if there is an association between personality change and cognitive dysfunction. Thirty-four MS patients and 14 healthy volunteers were studied. All underwent comprehensive neurologic and neuropsychologic evaluation. Personality assessments included both self and informant reports on the Hogan Empathy Scale and the NEO Personality Inventory. Abnormalities were found among MS patients indicating elevated neuroticism and reduction in empathy, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. Large patient/informant discrepancies were observed in the MS but not the control group. Three neuropsychological tests emphasizing executive control predicted the presence of these abnormalities; this association suggests a neurogenic, frontal lobe syndrome.
    Journal of Neuropsychiatry 02/2001; 13(1):70-6. · 2.77 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cognitive dysfunction is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), yet few studies have examined effects of treatment on neuropsychological (NP) performance. To evaluate the effects of interferon beta-1a (IFNbeta-1a, 30 microg administered intramuscularly once weekly [Avonex]) on cognitive function, a Comprehensive NP Battery was administered at baseline and week 104 to relapsing MS patients in the phase III study, 166 of whom completed both assessments. A Brief NP Battery was also administered at 6-month intervals. The primary NP outcome measure was 2-year change on the Comprehensive NP Battery, grouped into domains of information processing and learning/memory (set A), visuospatial abilities and problem solving (set B), and verbal abilities and attention span (set C). NP effects were most pronounced in cognitive domains vulnerable to MS: IFNbeta-1a had a significant beneficial effect on the set A composite, with a favorable trend evident on set B. Secondary outcome analyses revealed significant between-group differences in slopes for Brief NP Battery performance and time to sustained deterioration in a Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test processing rate, favoring the IFNbeta-1a group. These results support and extend previous observations of significant beneficial effects of IFNbeta-1a for relapsing MS.
    Annals of Neurology 01/2001; 48(6):885-92. · 11.91 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We studied the effectiveness of a newly-developed cognitive-behavioral intervention in 15 patients with marked cognitive impairment and behavior disorder. The design was a single-blind test of a neuropsychological intervention, with pre- and post-treatment assessments of personality and social behavior. MS patients underwent neurological examination and neuropsychological testing at baseline. The patients were then randomly assigned to neuropsychological counseling or standard, non-specific supportive psychotherapy. The active 12-week treatment emphasized enhancement of insight through education, social skills training, and behavior modification. All patients were re-examined within 2 weeks of the termination of treatment. Neuropsychological technicians were blind to treatment condition. Both groups showed evidence of cognitive impairment and personality/behavior disorder prior to treatment and were well matched on demographic, disability, and cognitive measures. Patients who underwent neuropsychological counseling showed significant positive response on measures of social behavior (e.g. excessive ego-centric speech) compared to those who underwent standard counseling. We conclude that these data support the use of non-pharmacological, neuropsychological counseling in patients with acquired, MS-associated behavior disorder.
    Multiple Sclerosis 01/2001; 6(6):391-6. DOI:10.1191/135245800701566377 · 4.86 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

5k Citations
500.22 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2001–2004
    • Mercy Hospital of Buffalo
      Buffalo, New York, United States
  • 1986–2003
    • University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
      • Department of Neurology
      Buffalo, NY, United States
  • 2002
    • Jaeb Center for Health Research
      Tampa, Florida, United States
    • Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center
      Buffalo, New York, United States
  • 1996–2001
    • Buffalo General Medical Center
      Buffalo, New York, United States
  • 1998–1999
    • University of California, San Francisco
      San Francisco, California, United States
  • 1997
    • Roswell Park Cancer Institute
      • Department of Neurology
      Buffalo, New York, United States
  • 1994–1995
    • Multiple Sclerosis Research Center of New York
      New York City, New York, United States