C Jiménez Romero

Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Madrid, Spain

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Publications (44)58.43 Total impact

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    Dataset: TP2014
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    ABSTRACT: Children are one of the groups with the highest mortality rate on the waiting list for LT. Primary closure of the abdominal wall is often impossible in the pediatric population, due to a size mismatch between a large graft and a small recipient. We present a retrospective cohort study of six pediatric patients, who underwent delayed abdominal wall closure with a biological mesh after LT, and in whom early closure was impossible. A non-cross-linked porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™ Reconstructive Tissue Matrix; LifeCell Corp, Bridgewater, NJ, USA) was used in all of the cases of the series. After a mean follow-up of 26 months (21–32 months), all patients were asymptomatic, with a functional abdominal wall after physical examination. Non-cross-linked porcine-derived acellular dermal matrix (Strattice™) is a good alternative for delayed abdominal wall closure after pediatric LT. Randomized controlled trials are necessary to determine the best moment and the best technique for abdominal wall closure.
    Pediatric Transplantation 07/2014; · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Renal failure (RF) is a frequent complication in non-renal solid organ transplants. In the present study, we analyze our experience with intestinal transplants (ITx).
    Transplantation Proceedings 07/2014; 46(6):2140-2. · 0.95 Impact Factor
  • Medicina Clínica 01/2014; · 1.40 Impact Factor
  • Medicina Clínica. 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: An increasing pressure on the liver transplant waiting list, forces us to explore new sources, in order to expand the donor pool. One of the most interesting and with a promising potential, is donation after cardiac death (DCD). Initially, this activity has developed in Spain by means of the Maastricht type II donation in the uncontrolled setting. For different reasons, donation after controlled cardiac death has been reconsidered in our country. The most outstanding circumstance involved in DCD donation is a potential ischemic stress, that could cause severe liver graft cell damage, resulting in an adverse effect on liver transplant results, in terms of complications and outcomes. The complex and particular issues related to DCD Donation will be discussed in this review.
    Cirugía Española 09/2013; · 0.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An increasing pressure on the liver transplant waiting list, forces us to explore new sources, in order to expand the donor pool. One of the most interesting and with a promising potential, is donation after cardiac death (DCD). Initially, this activity has developed in Spain by means of the Maastricht type II donation in the uncontrolled setting. For different reasons, donation after controlled cardiac death has been reconsidered in our country. The most outstanding circumstance involved in DCD donation is a potential ischemic stress, that could cause severe liver graft cell damage, resulting in an adverse effect on liver transplant results, in terms of complications and outcomes. The complex and particular issues related to DCD Donation will be discussed in this review.
    Cirugía Española 01/2013; 91(9):554–562. · 0.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We evaluate the 5-year results of a single-centre prospective randomized trial that compared cyclosporine microemulsion (CyA-me) in triple therapy (plus steroids and azathioprine) and Tacrolimus (Tac) in double therapy (plus steroids) for primary immunosuppression. One hundred adult patients undergoing liver transplantation were randomized to receive Tac (n=51) or CyA-me (n=49). Ten patients in group A, and thirty-one patients in group B had their main immunosuppressive agent switched. The switch was much more frequent from CyA-me to Tac (n=31; 62.3%), mainly because of lack of efficacy (n=12; 38.7%). Six of 10 patients were shifted from Tac to CyA-me for side effects. The clinical course of the majority of patients converted from CyA-me to Tac improved clearly after conversion. Donor age and acute rejection (number, severity and rejection free days) had a significative association with lack of efficacy in group B. In these series, the conversion to Tac from CyA-me could be accomplished safely, with an excellent long-term outcome.
    Hepato-gastroenterology 11/2011; 58(106):532-5. · 0.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Solid organ recipients are at high risk to develop malignancies due to the complex interactions of several factors, constituting a major cause of late death after transplantation. We retrospectively reviewed an historic cohort of adult liver recipients from cadaveric donors (multiorgan recipients excluded) performed from 1986-2002 with a minimum follow-up of 36 months. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess cumulative risk to develop malignancy and survival analyses. Among the 528 patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) with a mean follow-up of 2400 days, 98 developed cancer among which 25% were skin malignancies. Sixty-seven patients developed at least 1 noncutaneous malignancy, an overall incidence of 12.7%. Eighteen percent suffered from posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease; 14%, lung cancer; 4%, Kaposi's sarcoma; 7%, genitourinary malignancies; and 17%, oropharyngeal or laryngeal cancer. The cumulative patient risks to develop noncutaneous malignancies at 5, 10, and 15 years posttransplantation were 9% (confidence interval [CI]: 0.06-0.11), 18% (CI: 0.14-0.23), and 25% (CI: 0.18-0.31), respectively. OLT recipients are at higher risk to develop malignancies after transplantation, reaching a cumulative risk of 25% at 15 years. Long-term surveillance measures and screening programs must be seriously conducted for selected groups.
    Transplantation Proceedings 01/2009; 41(6):2447-9. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a disorder caused by the Taenia solium larva. It is the most common parasitosis of the central nervous system (CNS). Its distribution is universal, but it is endemic in many developing countries and in the third world. In Spain most patients come from countries where the condition is endemic. However, sporadic cases occur among the population of rural regions. NCC in transplant recipients is uncommon. One renal transplant recipient developed NCC but responded to treatment with praziquantel. Recently, it has been reported to complicate a liver transplantation. The patient was a 49-year-old Ecuatorian man who received a cadaveric donor liver graft in June 2001 due to acute liver failure induced by toadstool and was under treatment with FK506. In January 2006, the patient presented with a generalized onset of a tonic-clonic seizure for 1 minute without sphincter incontinence, headache, fever, or previous brain trauma. Neurological evaluation did not show evidence of organic brain dysfunction. The neuroimaging findings (brain) computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging were compatible with NCC: many cystic lesions intra- and extraparenchymatous with a scolex visible in three of them. Serology for cysticercosis in plasma was initially indeterminate but positive afterward. The patient was treated with anticonvulsivants (valproic acid) and albendazole. Systemic steroids were added in order to reduce the edema produced upon death of the cyst. Treatment lasted 3 weeks and it was completed without complications or neurological symptoms. Liver function was not affected. One year later the patient remained asymptomatic. NCC is a condition that must be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with CNS involvement and cystic lesions on neuroimaging investigations in transplant recipients, especially patients originating from or traveling to endemic areas. First-line therapy for active cysts includes antiparasitic drugs (albendazole or praziquantel) as well as steroids and anticonvulsivants. In our patient, this therapy was effective.
    Transplantation Proceedings 10/2007; 39(7):2454-7. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Liver transplantation (OLT) has been advocated as a good management option for patients with carcinoma hepatocellular (HCC). More recurrences are extrahepatic due to many pathological factors. From April 1986 to December 2003, we performed 95. OLTs for HCC including 73% men of mean age of 54.7 years and 25.3% not filling Mazzaferro's criteria. The recurrence incidence was 15.8% (n = 15), including only extrahepatic lesions in 11 (mainly lung recurrence, seven) and hepatic plus extrahepatic in four. Main late mortality was due to tumor recurrence (n = 12, 33.3%). No differences were observed among sex, preoperative chemoembolization, age, Child, Okuda, etiology, or satellite nodules. A greater incidence of tumor recurrence was observed with a preoperative biopsy (45.5% vs 5.9%, P = .0001); and alpha fetoprotein (AFP) > 200 ng/mL (37.5% vs 13.3%, P = .08); known HCC (25.5% vs 3.1%, P = .008); vascular invasion (42.1% vs 10.3%, P = .001); > 5 cm single nodule (50% vs 13%, P = .004); more than three nodules (50% vs 13.9%, P = .01); moderately to poorly differentiated tumors (37.5% vs 12.7%, P = .01); pTNM IV (50% vs 8.7%, P = .0001); and not meeting Milan criteria (40.9% vs 9.2%, P = .001). These are the same factors for extrahepatic recurrence. For hepatic recurrence the prognostic factors were: vascular invasion (15.8% vs 1.5%, P = .008), more than three nodules (25% vs 2.5%, P = .004), moderately to poorly differentiated tumors (18.8% vs 1.4%, P = .003), pTNM IV (16.7% vs 1.4%, P = .006), and not meeting Milan criteria (13.6% vs 1.5%, P = .01). Recurrence incidence with Milan criteria was less than 10%, mainly extrahepatic (lung). Prognostic factors for tumor recurrence were pathological features, namely vascular invasion, more than three nodules, size larger than 5 cm, moderately to poorly differentiated tumors, pTNM IV stage. The use of preoperative chemoembolization did not decrease the recurrence rate. A preoperative biopsy increased the incidence of extrahepatic recurrence.
    Transplantation Proceedings 09/2007; 39(7):2304-7. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Living donor liver transplantation was first described as a way to alleviate the organ shortage. Extensive studies of both the prospective donor and the recipient are necessary to ensure successful outcome. In this paper we describe our results in 28 living donor liver transplantations from the perspective of the donor and the recipient. A prospective, longitudinal, observational, comparative study was conducted from April 1995 to October 2004, including 28 living donor liver transplantations. After a mean follow-up time of 25.6 +/- 20.58 months, all donors are alive, showing normal liver function tests. All of them have been reincorporated into their normal lives. At the end of the study and after a mean follow-up time of 21.2 +/- 14.3 months, 86.3% of the adult recipients are alive. Actuarial recipient survivals at 6, 12, and 36 months were 86.36%. Actuarial mean survival time was 44 months (95% CI, 37 to 51). At the end of the study, 77.3% of the grafts are functioning. Actuarial graft survivals at 6, 12, and 36 months were 77.27%. Actuarial mean graft survival time was 32 months (95% CI, 25 to 39). The main complications were hepatic artery thrombosis (n = 2) and small for-size syndrome (n = 2). At a mean follow-up of 20.33 +/- 7.74 months, all pediatric recipients are alive. Actuarial recipient survivals at 12 and 36 months were 100% and actuarial graft survivals were 80%. Living donor liver transplantation may increase the liver graft pool, and therefore reduce waiting list mortality. Nevertheless caution must be deserved to avoid surgical morbidity and mortality in with the donor the recipient.
    Transplantation Proceedings 12/2005; 37(9):3884-6. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Liver transplantation (OLT) has been advocated for patients with carcinoma hepatocellular (HCC). A preoperative biopsy (fine needle aspiration biopsy) [FNA] facilitates preoperative diagnosis of adverse pathological factors: vascular invasion or histologicalic differentiation. But a biopsy may cause abdominal dissemination and be related to a higher incidence of recurrence. From April 1986 to December 2003, we performed 95 OLT for HCC. We divided them in two groups: group A without FNA-biopsy (67.9%) and group B with FNA-biopsy (32.1%). We obtained the diagnosis of HCC in only 15 patients (57.6%). In two patients an OLT was avoided due to the presence of abdominal dissemination at the time of transplant. Recurrence incidence was higher among group B patients (5.9% vs 31.8%; P = .003) due to extrahepatic recurrence (2% vs 27.3%; P = .003). No differences were observed in morbidity or mortality. The two groups were homogeneous in epidemiological and pathological variables except: sex distribution, Child status, AFP level, tumor size, and pTNM stage. If we compare recurrence rates in the two groups attending to these nonhomogeneous variables, it was significantly higher among patients with tumors larger than 3 cm, pTNM I-III stage, Child B-C, AFP >200 ng/mL, and males or females. Preoperative liver biopsy is associated with a larger incidence of tumor recurrence, so we believe that it is not necessary prior to an OLT for HCC.
    Transplantation Proceedings 11/2005; 37(9):3874-7. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Because of the current shortage of cadaveric organs, it is important to determine preoperatively those variables that are readily available, inexpensive, and noninvasive that can predict a higher incidence of hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT). From April 1986 to October 2001, 717 patients underwent 804 liver transplants. All the arterial reconstructions were performed with fine (7-0) monofilament sutures in an interrupted fashion. Two methods were used: group I, end-to-end arterial anastomosis, and group II, the gastroduodenal branch patch. After a mean follow-up of 72 (range 3-174) months, HAT was observed in 19 patients (overall incidence 2.4%). End-to-end anastomosis (group I) was performed in 39.50% (316) of cases, and HAT developed in 14 (4.4%) cases. Branch-patch anastomoses (group II) were carried out in 60.5% (488) of the patients; the presence of HAT was detected in five cases (1.03%) (P = 0.03, P < 0.05). A total of 21 variables were selected in the univariate analysis; however, after the multivariate analysis, all but two of the factors lost statistical significance, and these corresponded to the type of arterial reconstruction (gastroduodenal branch patch vs. end-to-end) and the ABO compatibility. Liver transplantation with compatible grafts using branch-patch anastomosis for the arterialization (both manipulative by the transplant team) reduces HAT-derived loss of grafts, with the consequent increase in graft availability and reduced mortality rate on the waiting list.
    Transplantation 06/2004; 77(10):1513-7. · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report five patients who underwent laparotomy for liver metastasis from breast cancer without extrahepatic spread, with the intention to perform liver resection. All these patients had been subjected to modified radical mastectomy following systemic chemotherapy and periodical consecutive investigations to detect distant spreading. After laparotomy, patients have been regularly followed. Case 1, right trisegmentectomy in a 53-year-old woman, 36.5 months after the mastectomy. In the 17th postoperative month she continues without relapse. Case 2, hepatic artery ligature in a 41-year-old woman, 15 months after the mastectomy. In the 17th postoperative month she died. Case 3, bisegmentectomy (VI-VII) in a 51-year-old woman, 24 months after the mastectomy. In the 17th postoperative month she died. Case 4, exploratory laparotomy in a 51-year-old woman, 91 months after the mastectomy. In the 31th postoperative month she remains alive. Case 5, segmentectomy (IV) in a 59-year-old woman, 112 months after the mastectomy. In the 33th postoperative month she continues without relapse. As a conclusion, the surgical resection of liver metastasis from breast tumors after chemotherapy must be used in selected cases.
    Hepato-gastroenterology 01/2004; 51(56):586-8. · 0.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Currently liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for early hepatocellular carcinoma and end-stage liver disease. We analyzed our experience to identify factors that could be used to select patients who will benefit from liver transplantation. From April 1986 to December 2001, 71 (8.7%) of 816 LT performed in our institution, were for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. In 25 patients the tumor was observed incidental by (35.2%). All patients had liver cirrhosis, most due to hepatitis C related (35) or alcoholic (14) diseases. Before liver transplantation, chemoembolization was performed in 18 patients (25.4%). Bilateral involvement was present in seven patients. Eight patients showed macroscopic vascular invasion, and eight others showed satellite nodules. Most patients were stage TNM II (29) and IVa (16). Overall 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival were 79.3%, 61%, and 50.3% with recurrence-free survivals of 74.6%, 57.5%, and 49%, respectively. With a mean follow-up of 42 months, 12 patients (19%) developed recurrence and 29 patients died (only 11 due to recurrence). Stage TNM IVa, macroscopic vascular invasion, and the presence of satellite nodules significantly affected overall survival and recurrence-free survival rates and histologic differentiation and bilateral involvement only recurrence-free survival. Patients with solitary tumors less than 5 cm or no more than three nodules smaller than 3 cm showed better recurrence-free survival and lower recurrence rates. In our experience, liver transplantation proffers good recurrence-free survival and low recurrence rates among patients with limited tumor extension. The most important prognostic factor was macroscopic vascular invasion.
    Transplantation Proceedings 09/2003; 35(5):1825-6. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The piggyback technique was first described in adult liver transplantation in 1989, although it has been used in conjunction with venous bypass, with cross-clamping the vena cava, or both. In this study, the inferior vena cava was not occluded at any time during the liver transplant. We compared the use of intraoperative blood products, fluid requirements, and vasoactive drugs among patients managed with bypass, without bypass, and with the piggyback technique. Between May 1986 and October 2002, 875 liver transplants included 50 patients divided into three groups (cases considered to be the preliminary series on each group): group A/piggyback (17 patients:34%), group B/ bypass (16 patients: 32%), and group C/no bypass (17 patients:34%). There were no differences in mean age, gender, UNOS or Child-Pugh score, and indications for liver transplantation. Mean follow up was 134.63+/-32.19 months. At the end of the study, 91.3% of the patients are alive with no operative mortality. There were no differences in postoperative complications, postreperfusion syndrome rate, and postoperative renal failure. However, the number of packed red blood cell units consumed intraoperatively (12+/-7.43 vs 18.03+/-11.46 vs 17.59 +/- 23.8; P =.043), the need for intraoperative crystaloids (3.1 L+/-1.6 vs 6.8+/-4.8 vs 9.1 L+/-3.6; P=.001) and the requirement for vasoactive drugs (18% vs 38% vs 24%; P=.043) was notably lower in group A vs group B vs group C. Operative time was longer in group A (121.54+/-37.77 vs 78.73+/-11.89 vs 87.07+/-14.33 minutes). The piggyback technique requires a longer operative time but offers the advantages of reducing the red blood cell requirements and preventing severe hemodynamic instability by virtue of reducing the need for vasoactive drugs and for a larger volume of intraoperative fluids.
    Transplantation Proceedings 09/2003; 35(5):1918-9. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: After the first combined liver-kidney transplantation (CLKT) reported by Margreiter in 1984, it became clear that renal failure was no longer an absolute contraindication. Our goal was to assess our results with combined liver-kidney transplant. Among 875 liver transplants performed between May 1986 and October 2002, there were 17 cases (1.96%) of combined liver-kidney transplant. With a mean follow-up of 42.2+/-29 months (range, 1-90), six patients had died (mortality: 37.5%). There were four (25%) operative in-hospital deaths, and two late mortality cases (beyond the month 6 after hospital discharge). The causes were sepsis (four cases, three postoperative and one in later follow-up), refractory heart failure (one postoperative), and recurrent liver disease (HCV-induced severe recurrence) during follow-up one). Actuarial survival (calculated for those who survived the postoperative period) was 80%, 71%, and 60% at 12, 36, and 60 months. Actuarial mean survival time was 60 months (95%IC:47-78). Neither the sex, the UNOS status, the etiology of liver disease, the etiology of renal failure, the type of hepatectomy (piggy back vs others) or the type of immunosuppression (P=.83) were related to long-term survival according to the log-rank test. A control group of 48 patients was constructed with subjects who underwent liver transplantation immediately before or after the combined transplant. A total (two cases after the CLKT and one case prior to). There were no differences in survival. Combined liver-kidney transplant represents a proper therapeutic option for patients with simultaneously failing organs based on long- and short-term outcomes.
    Transplantation Proceedings 09/2003; 35(5):1863-5. · 0.95 Impact Factor
  • Transplantation Proceedings 03/2002; 34(1):243-4. · 0.95 Impact Factor
  • Transplantation Proceedings 03/2002; 34(1):233-4. · 0.95 Impact Factor