Tatjana Degenhardt

Wageningen University, Wageningen, Provincie Gelderland, Netherlands

Are you Tatjana Degenhardt?

Claim your profile

Publications (15)128.63 Total impact

  • Source
    Cell 11/2010; 143(4):651. · 31.96 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Journal of Molecular Biology 11/2010; 404(1):172. · 3.91 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) is an important regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism. While PPARalpha is known to activate transcription of numerous genes, no comprehensive picture of PPARalpha binding to endogenous genes has yet been reported. To fill this gap, we performed Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-chip in combination with transcriptional profiling on HepG2 human hepatoma cells treated with the PPARalpha agonist GW7647. We found that GW7647 increased PPARalpha binding to 4220 binding regions. GW7647-induced binding regions showed a bias around the transcription start site and most contained a predicted PPAR binding motif. Several genes known to be regulated by PPARalpha, such as ACOX1, SULT2A1, ACADL, CD36, IGFBP1 and G0S2, showed GW7647-induced PPARalpha binding to their promoter. A GW7647-induced PPARalpha-binding region was also assigned to SREBP-targets HMGCS1, HMGCR, FDFT1, SC4MOL, and LPIN1, expression of which was induced by GW7647, suggesting cross-talk between PPARalpha and SREBP signaling. Our data furthermore demonstrate interaction between PPARalpha and STAT transcription factors in PPARalpha-mediated transcriptional repression, and suggest interaction between PPARalpha and TBP, and PPARalpha and C/EBPalpha in PPARalpha-mediated transcriptional activation. Overall, our analysis leads to important new insights into the mechanisms and impact of transcriptional regulation by PPARalpha in human liver and highlight the importance of cross-talk with other transcription factors.
    Nucleic Acids Research 05/2010; 38(9):2839-50. · 8.81 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although dietary fatty acids are a major fuel for the heart, little is known about the direct effects of dietary fatty acids on gene regulation in the intact heart. To study the effect of dietary fatty acids on cardiac gene expression and explore the functional consequences. Oral administration of synthetic triglycerides composed of one single fatty acid altered cardiac expression of numerous genes, many of which are involved in the oxidative stress response. The gene most significantly and consistently upregulated by dietary fatty acids encoded Angiopoietin-like protein (Angptl)4, a circulating inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase expressed by cardiomyocytes. Induction of Angptl4 by the fatty acid linolenic acid was specifically abolished in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)beta/delta(-/-) and not PPARalpha(-/-) mice and was blunted on siRNA-mediated PPARbeta/delta knockdown in cultured cardiomyocytes. Consistent with these data, linolenic acid stimulated binding of PPARbeta/delta but not PPARalpha to the Angptl4 gene. Upregulation of Angptl4 resulted in decreased cardiac uptake of plasma triglyceride-derived fatty acids and decreased fatty acid-induced oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. In contrast, Angptl4 deletion led to enhanced oxidative stress in the heart, both after an acute oral fat load and after prolonged high fat feeding. Stimulation of cardiac Angptl4 gene expression by dietary fatty acids and via PPARbeta/delta is part of a feedback mechanism aimed at protecting the heart against lipid overload and consequently fatty acid-induced oxidative stress.
    Circulation Research 04/2010; 106(11):1712-21. · 11.86 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) is an important transcription factor in liver that can be activated physiologically by fasting or pharmacologically by using high-affinity synthetic agonists. Here we initially set out to elucidate the similarities in gene induction between Wy14643 and fasting. Numerous genes were commonly regulated in liver between the two treatments, including many classical PPARalpha target genes, such as Aldh3a2 and Cpt2. Remarkably, several genes induced by Wy14643 were upregulated by fasting independently of PPARalpha, including Lpin2 and St3gal5, suggesting involvement of another transcription factor. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, Lpin2 and St3gal5 were shown to be direct targets of PPARbeta/delta during fasting, whereas Aldh3a2 and Cpt2 were exclusive targets of PPARalpha. Binding of PPARbeta/delta to the Lpin2 and St3gal5 genes followed the plasma free fatty acid (FFA) concentration, consistent with activation of PPARbeta/delta by plasma FFAs. Subsequent experiments using transgenic and knockout mice for Angptl4, a potent stimulant of adipose tissue lipolysis, confirmed the stimulatory effect of plasma FFAs on Lpin2 and St3gal5 expression levels via PPARbeta/delta. In contrast, the data did not support activation of PPARalpha by plasma FFAs. The results identify Lpin2 and St3gal5 as novel PPARbeta/delta target genes and show that upregulation of gene expression by PPARbeta/delta is sensitive to plasma FFA levels. In contrast, this is not the case for PPARalpha, revealing a novel mechanism for functional differentiation between PPARs.
    Molecular and Cellular Biology 10/2009; 29(23):6257-67. · 5.04 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: SUMMARY Eukaryotic transcription is a dynamic process relying on a large number of proteins. By measuring the cycling expression of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 gene in human cells, we constructed a detailed stochastic model for single-gene tran- scription at the molecular level using realistic kinetics for diffusion and protein complex dynamics. We observed that gene induction caused an approxi- mate 60 min periodicity of several transcription re- lated processes: first, the covalent histone modifica- tions and presence of many regulatory proteins at the transcription start site; second, RNA polymerase II activity; third, chromatin loop formation; and fourth, mRNA accumulation. Our model can predict the pre- cise timing of single-gene activity leading to tran- scriptional cycling on the cell population level when we take into account the sequential and irreversible multistep nature of transcriptional initiation. We pro- pose that the cyclic nature of population gene ex- pression is primarily based on the intrinsic periodicity of the transcription process itself.
    Cell 08/2009; 138(3):489-501. · 31.96 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Heme is an essential prosthetic group of proteins involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism and nitric oxide production. ALAS1 (5-aminolevulinate synthase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in heme synthesis in the liver and is highly regulated to adapt to the metabolic demand of the hepatocyte. In the present study, we describe human hepatic ALAS1 as a new direct target for the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). In primary human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells, PPARalpha agonists induced an increase in ALAS1 mRNA levels, which was abolished by PPARalpha silencing. These effects are mediated by two functional PPAR binding sites at positions -9 and -2.3 kb relative to the ALAS1 transcription start site. PPARalpha ligand treatment also up-regulated the mRNA levels of the genes ALAD (5-aminolevulinate dehydratase), UROS (uroporphyrinogen III synthase), UROD (uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase), CPOX (coproporphyrinogen oxidase) and PPOX (protoporphyrinogen oxidase) encoding for enzymes controlling further steps in heme biosynthesis. In HepG2 cells treated with PPARalpha agonists and in mouse liver upon fasting, the association of PPARalpha, its partner retinoid X receptor, PPARgamma co-activator 1alpha and activated RNA polymerase II with the transcription start site region of all six genes was increased, leading to higher levels of the metabolite heme. In conclusion, these data strongly support a role of PPARalpha in the regulation of human ALAS1 and of five additional genes of the pathway, consequently leading to increased heme synthesis.
    Journal of Molecular Biology 04/2009; 388(2):225-38. · 3.91 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The anti-proliferative effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1alpha,25(OH)2D3] converge via the interaction of un-liganded vitamin D receptor (VDR) with co-repressors recruiting multiprotein complexes containing HDACs and via the induction of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI) genes of the INK4 and Cip/Kip family. We investigated the effects of the HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA) and 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 on the proliferation and CDKI gene expression in malignant and non-malignant mammary epithelial cell lines. TSA induced the INK4-family genes p18 and p19, whereas the Cip/Kip family gene p21 was stimulated by 1alpha,25(OH)2D3. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA inhibition assays showed that the co-repressor NCoR1 and some HDAC family members complexed un-liganded VDR and repressed the basal level of CDKI genes, but their role in regulating CDKI gene expression by TSA and 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 were contrary. HDAC3 and HDAC7 attenuated 1alpha,25(OH)2D3-dependent induction of the p21 gene, for which NCoR1 is essential. In contrast, TSA-mediated induction of the p18 gene was dependent on HDAC3 and HDAC4, but was opposed by NCoR1 and un-liganded VDR. This suggests that the attenuation of the response to TSA by NCoR1 or that to 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 by HDACs can be overcome by their combined application achieving maximal induction of anti-proliferative target genes.
    Nucleic Acids Research 02/2008; 36(1):121-32. · 8.81 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ghrelin may influence the development of obesity through its role in the control of energy balance, food intake, and regulation of body weight. The effects of ghrelin are mediated via the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). We genotyped 7 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the GHSR gene and assessed the association between those SNPs and obesity and type 2 diabetes-related phenotypes from 507 middle-aged overweight persons with impaired glucose tolerance participating in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS). Additionally, we performed in silico screening of the 5'-regulatory region of GHSR and evaluated SNPs disrupting putative transcription factor (TF) binding sites in vitro with gelshift assays to determine differences in protein binding between different alleles of SNPs. Rs9819506 in the promoter region of GHSR was associated with body weight (p = 0.036); persons with rs9819506-AA genotype having the lowest body weight. Individuals with rs490683-CC genotype displayed highest weight loss in the whole study population (p = 0.032). The false discovery rate for these results was <10%. Rs490683 and rs509035 were associated with several measures of glucose and insulin metabolism during the follow-up. Rs490683 may be a functional SNP, since gelshift experiments showed differential protein binding between the alleles, with higher binding to the G-allele. Rs490683-C may disrupt a putative binding site for the TF nuclear factor 1 (NF-1), thus rs4906863-GG genotype where the NF-1 site is intact may lead to a higher GHSR gene expression. Polymorphisms in the GHSR promoter may modify changes in body weight during long-term lifestyle intervention and affect ghrelin receptor signalling through modulation of GHSR gene expression.
    PLoS ONE 01/2008; 3(8):e2941. · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Chemistry and Physics of Lipids - CHEM PHYS LIPIDS. 01/2008; 154.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The nuclear receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are known for their critical role in the metabolic syndrome. Here, we show that they are direct regulators of the family of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) genes, whose products act as metabolic homeostats in sensing hunger and satiety levels in key metabolic tissues by modulating the activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Mis-regulation of this tightly controlled network may lead to hyperglycemia. In human embryonal kidney cells we found the mRNA expression of PDK2, PDK3 and PDK4 to be under direct primary control of PPAR ligands, and in normal mouse kidney tissue Pdk2 and Pdk4 are PPAR targets. Both, treatment of HEK cells with PPARbeta/delta-specific siRNA and the genetic disruption of the Pparbeta/delta gene in mouse fibroblasts resulted in reduced expression of Pdk genes and abolition of induction by PPARbeta/delta ligands. These findings suggest that PPARbeta/delta is a key regulator of PDK genes, in particular the PDK4/Pdk4 gene. In silico analysis of the human PDK genes revealed two candidate PPAR response elements in the PDK2 gene, five in the PDK3 gene and two in the PDK4 gene, but none in the PDK1 gene. For seven of these sites we could demonstrate both PPARbeta/delta ligand responsiveness in context of their chromatin region and simultaneous association of PPARbeta/delta with its functional partner proteins, such as retinoidXreceptor, co-activator and mediator proteins and phosphorylated RNA polymerase II. In conclusion, PDK2, PDK3 and PDK4 are primary PPARbeta/delta target genes in humans underlining the importance of the receptor in the control of metabolism.
    Journal of Molecular Biology 10/2007; 372(2):341-55. · 3.91 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are known for their critical role in the development of diseases, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer. Here, an in silico screening method is presented, which incorporates experiment- and informatics-derived evidence, such as DNA-binding data of PPAR subtypes to a panel of PPAR response elements (PPREs), PPRE location relative to the transcription start site (TSS) and PPRE conservation across multiple species, for more reliable prediction of PPREs. In vitro binding and in vivo functionality evidence agrees with in silico predictions, validating the approach. The experimental analysis of 30 putative PPREs in eight validated PPAR target genes indicates that each gene contains at least one functional, strong PPRE that occurs without positional bias relative to the TSS. An extended analysis of the cross-species conservation of PPREs reveals limited conservation of PPRE patterns, although PPAR target genes typically contain strong or multiple medium strength PPREs. Human chromosome 19 was screened using this method, with validation of six novel PPAR target genes. An in silico screening approach is presented, which allows increased sensitivity of PPAR binding site and target gene detection.
    Genome biology 02/2007; 8(7):R147. · 10.30 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1) is a biomarker for metabolic and hyperproliferative diseases. At the same time, the nuclear receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are known for their critical role in the development of both the metabolic syndrome and various cancers. Here we demonstrate, in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and in normal mouse liver, that IGFBP-1 mRNA expression is under the primary control of PPAR ligands. We applied an improved in silico screening approach for PPAR response elements (PPREs) and identified five candidate PPREs located within 10 kb of the transcription start site (TSS) of the IGFBP-1 gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that, in living cells, the genomic region containing the most proximal PPRE, at position -1200 (relative to the TSS), preferentially associates with multiple PPAR subtypes and various other components of the transcriptional apparatus, which include their heterodimerizing partner, retinoid X receptor, as well as phosphorylated RNA polymerase II, co-repressor, co-activator, and mediator proteins. Moreover, further chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the TSS regions of the IGFBP-1 gene and those of the related IGFBP-2, -5, and -6, but not of IGFBP-3 and -4 genes, bind PPARs as well. We also show that these additional PPAR binding genes contain a number of candidate PPREs and that their mRNA levels respond quickly to the presence of PPAR ligands, indicating that they are also primary PPAR target genes.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 01/2007; 281(51):39607-19. · 4.65 Impact Factor
  • Circulation Research 106 (2010).
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Table S1. Simplified model of mRNA metabolism. The molecular species, corresponding variables and their mass balances are given in the upper part of the table. Generally, the binding of a NR to a RE causes chromatin modification that in turn allows other protein binding and loop formation (modeled as a single step) with the TSS, on which Pol II is bound. This causes phosphorylation of Pol II and remodification of the RE (modeled as one step) and loop dissociation. Pol II can then start elongation, producing mRNA, which is subsequently degraded. Only independent variables were taken into account by introducing conserved moieties for the RE, TSS, PPARβ/δ and Pol II. The protein concentrations were taken to be 103 molecules per nucleus, the on-rates 100-times lower than diffusion limit (see results for explanation). The loop formation, modification and initiation times were assumed to be faster than association, literature estimation for elongation rate and estimated degradation rate was assumed.

Publication Stats

352 Citations
128.63 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010
    • Wageningen University
      • Division of Human Nutrition
      Wageningen, Provincie Gelderland, Netherlands
  • 2007–2010
    • University of Kuopio
      • Department of Biochemistry
      Kuopio, Eastern Finland Province, Finland
  • 2009
    • University Medical Center Utrecht
      • Department of Metabolic and Endocrine Disease
      Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands