Stefania Curti

University of Bologna, Bolonia, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

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Publications (49)123.34 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to construct PubMed search strings that could efficiently retrieve studies on manual therapy (MT), especially for time-constrained clinicians. Our experts chose 11 Medical Subject Heading terms describing MT along with 84 additional potential terms. For each term that was able to retrieve more than 100 abstracts, we systematically extracted a sample of abstracts from which we estimated the proportion of studies potentially relevant to MT. We then constructed 2 search strings: 1 narrow (threshold of pertinent articles ≥40%) and 1 expanded (including all terms for which a proportion had been calculated). We tested these search strings against articles on 2 conditions relevant to MT (thoracic and temporomandibular pain). We calculated the number of abstracts needed to read (NNR) to identify 1 potentially pertinent article in the context of these conditions. Finally, we evaluated the efficiency of the proposed PubMed search strings to identify relevant articles included in a systematic review on spinal manipulative therapy for chronic low back pain. Fifty-five search terms were able to extract more than 100 citations. The NNR to find 1 potentially pertinent article using the narrow string was 1.2 for thoracic pain and 1.3 for temporomandibular pain, and the NNR for the expanded string was 1.9 and 1.6, respectively. The narrow search strategy retrieved all the randomized controlled trials included in the systematic review selected for comparison. The proposed PubMed search strings may help health care professionals locate potentially pertinent articles and review a large number of MT studies efficiently to better implement evidence-based practice. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics. 12/2014;
  • British Journal of Cancer 08/2014; · 4.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective Some anthropometric measures were reported in association with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Our aim was to detect optimal cut-offs of body, hand/wrist measures to correctly identify CTS patients using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves.Methods We enrolled one CTS case for two controls regardless of age and gender. CTS diagnosis was made according to clinical findings and distal conduction delay of the median nerve. Anthropometric measures were: weight, height, waist and hip circumferences, wrist depth and width, third digit length, palm length and width. Obesity indicators and hand and wrist ratios were calculated. Area under the ROC curves (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios were calculated separately for gender. To assess the role of multiple anthropometric measures, we fitted multivariable logistic regression models including age, wrist ratio, shape index, body mass index, and waist-to-hip ratio.Results 1,117 patients were included (250 cases and 474 controls among females; 120 cases and 273 controls among males). Among females, all anthropometric measures presented low accuracy (AUC≤0.64). Among males, hand ratio, shape index, and wrist-palm ratio showed moderate accuracy (AUC 0.75). The estimates from the multivariable models confirmed the well-known associations between the selected variables and the risk of CTS, but the use of multiple predictors did not dramatically improved the diagnostic performance observed for single anthropometric indexes.Conclusion The cut-offs of many anthropometric measures have limited value in clinical practice as a diagnostic tool for CTS. © 2014 American College of Rheumatology.
    Arthritis Care and Research 08/2014; · 4.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several optimised search strategies have been developed in Medicine, and more recently in Occupational Medicine. Aim of this study is to identify efficient PubMed search strategies for the study of putative environmental determinants of a disease.
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine 06/2014; 71 Suppl 1:A115. · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several optimized search strategies have been developed in Medicine, and more recently in Occupational Medicine. The aim of this study was to identify efficient PubMed search strategies to retrieve articles regarding putative occupational determinants of agricultural workers' diseases. We selected the Medical Subjects Heading (MeSH) term agricultural workers' diseases and six MeSH terms describing farm work (agriculture, agrochemicals NOT pesticides, animal husbandry, pesticides, rural health, rural population) alongside 61 other promising terms. We estimated proportions of articles containing potentially pertinent information regarding occupational etiology to formulate two search strategies (one "more specific," one "more sensitive"). We applied these strategies to retrieve information on the possible occupational etiology among agricultural workers of kidney cancer, knee osteoarthritis, and multiple sclerosis. We evaluated the number of needed to read (NNR) abstracts to identify one potentially pertinent article in the context of these pathologies. The "more specific" search string was based on the combination of terms that yielded the highest proportion (40%) of potentially pertinent abstracts. The "more sensitive" string was based on use of broader search fields and additional coverage provided by other search terms under study. Using the "more specific" string, the NNR to find one potentially pertinent article were: 1.1 for kidney cancer; 1.4 for knee osteoarthritis; 1.2 for multiple sclerosis. Using the sensitive strategy, the NNR were 1.4, 3.6, and 6.3, respectively. The proposed strings could help health care professionals explore putative occupational etiology for agricultural workers' diseases (even if not generally thought to be work related). Am. J. Ind. Med. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    American Journal of Industrial Medicine 09/2013; 56(12). · 1.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in European countries varies considerably. We analyzed data from the fifth European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) to explore the role of personal, occupational, and social risk factors in determining the national prevalence of musculoskeletal pain. Over the course of 2010, 43 816 subjects from 34 countries were interviewed. We analyzed the one-year prevalence of back and neck/upper-limb pain. Individual-level risk factors studied included: sex; age; educational level; socioeconomic status; housework or cooking; gardening and repairs; somatizing tendency; job demand-control; six physical occupational exposures; and occupational group. Data on national socioeconomic variables were obtained from Eurostat and were available for 28 countries. We fitted Poisson regression models with random intercept by country. The main analysis comprised 35 550 workers. Among individual-level risk factors, somatizing tendency was the strongest predictor of the symptoms. Major differences were observed by country with back pain more than twice as common in Portugal (63.8%) than Ireland (25.7%), and prevalence rates of neck/upper-limb pain ranging from 26.6% in Ireland to 67.7% in Finland. Adjustment for individual-level risk factors slightly reduced the large variation in prevalence between countries. For back pain, the rates were more homogenous after adjustment for national socioeconomic variables. Our analysis indicates substantial variation between European countries in the prevalence of back and neck/upper-limb pain. This variation is unexplained by established individual risk factors. It may be attributable in part to socioeconomic differences between countries, with higher prevalence where there is less risk of poverty or social exclusion.
    Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health 09/2013; · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Candidate risk factors for idiopathic rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) include heavy manual handling (requiring Valsalva's maneuver). We assessed incidence rates of surgically treated idiopathic RRD among manual workers, non-manual workers and housewives resident in Tuscany, Italy. We retrieved all hospital discharge records bearing a principal diagnosis corresponding to RRD coupled with retinal surgery for any resident of Tuscany during 1997-2009. After elimination of repeated admissions and patients with coexistent, associated conditions (including recent trauma), subjects aged 25-59 years were classified as manual workers, non-manual workers or housewives. Population data were extracted from the 2001 census. We identified 1,946 eligible cases (1,142 men). Among men, manual workers experienced a 1.8-fold higher age-standardized rate per 100,000 person-years than non-manual workers [17.4 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 16.1-18.7) vs. 9.8 (95 % CI 8.8-10.8)]. Age-standardized rates among women were 1.9-fold higher for manual workers [11.1 (95 % CI 9.8-12.3)] and 1.7-fold higher for housewives [9.5 (95 % CI 8.3-10.8)] than in non-manual workers [5.7 (95 % CI 4.8-6.6)]. This large population-based study suggests that manual workers are affected by idiopathic RRD requiring surgical treatment more often than non-manual workers. The higher rates of surgically treated RRD experienced by manual workers are in accord with the hypothesis that heavy manual handling may have a causal role.
    International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 07/2013; 87(5). · 2.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To investigate the association between external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and mesothelioma using data from the US Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) cancer registries. METHODS: We analyzed data from the SEER database (1973-2009). We compared EBRT versus no radiotherapy. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) of mesothelioma among prostate cancer patients were estimated with multilevel Poisson models adjusted by race, age, and calendar year. Confounding by asbestos was investigated using relative risk of mesothelioma in each case's county of residence as a proxy for asbestos exposure. RESULTS: Four hundred and seventy-one mesothelioma cases (93.6 % pleural) occurred in 3,985,991 person-years. The IRR of mesothelioma was increased for subjects exposed to EBRT (1.28; 95 % CI 1.05, 1.55) compared to non-irradiated patients, and a population attributable fraction of 0.49 % (95 % CI 0.11, 0.81) was estimated. The IRR increased with latency period: 0-4 years, IRR 1.08 (95 % CI 0.81, 1.44); 5-9 years, IRR 1.31 (95 % CI 0.93, 1.85); ≥10 years, IRR 1.59 (95 % CI 1.05, 2.42). Despite the fairly strong evidence of association with EBRT, the population attributable rate of mesothelioma was modest-3.3 cases per 100,000 person-years. The cumulative incidence of mesothelioma attributable to EBRT was 4.0/100,000 over 5 years, 24.5/100,000 over 10 years, and 65.0/100,000 over 15 years. CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides evidence that EBRT for prostate cancer is a small but detectable risk factor for mesothelioma. Patients should be advised of risk of radiation-induced second malignancies.
    Cancer Causes and Control 05/2013; · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSES: We conducted a case-control analysis to explore the association between occupational exposure to asbestos and cholangiocarcinoma (CC). METHODS: The study was based on historical data from 155 consecutive patients with CC [69 intrahepatic CC (ICC) and 86 extrahepatic CC (ECC)] referred to Sant'Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital between 2006 and 2010. The cases were individually matched by calendar period of birth, sex, and region of residence to historical hospital and population controls. Occupational exposure to asbestos was retrospectively assessed considering job titles obtained from work histories. Separate conditional logistic regression models were applied for ECC and ICC. Estimates were adjusted for smoking status and socioeconomic class. RESULTS: We matched 149 controls (median birth year: 1947; males: 56 %) to 41 cases of ICC (median birth year: 1946; males: 56 %) and 212 controls (median birth year: 1945; males: 48 %) to 59 cases of ECC (median birth year: 1945; males 51 %); 53 cases were not matched due to residence or birth year. We found an increased risk of ICC in workers exposed to asbestos (adjusted OR 4.81, 95 % CI 1.73-13.33); we also observed suggestive evidence that asbestos exposure might be associated with ECC (adjusted OR 2.09, 95 % CI 0.83-5.27). Sensitivity analysis restricted to patients from the Province of Bologna produced confirmatory figures. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that ICC could be associated with asbestos exposure; a chronic inflammatory pathway is hypothesized. Exposure to asbestos could be one of the determinants of the progressive rise in the incidence of ICC during the last 30 years.
    Cancer Causes and Control 02/2013; 24(5). · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND:: We investigated a possible association between pharyngeal/tonsillar carcinoma and mixed carcinogen exposures in an asphalt roll company in Italy that used asbestos until 1979, when a new factory was built using a different production process. METHODS:: We evaluated all workers involved in the entire production history of the company, divided into two subcohorts based on exposure status (workers in the original factory, 1964-1979, and those who worked only in the new factory, 1980-1997). We ascertained the vital status of the study population in February 2001. RESULTS:: Among the subset of workers in the earlier subcohort, there were five deaths from pharyngeal/tonsillar carcinoma for a standardized mortality ratio of 21 (95% confidence interval = 8.8-51). No cases were recorded among workers hired after 1979. CONCLUSION:: The increased standardized mortality ratio for this relatively rare cancer among workers exposed before 1979 may have been due to carcinogenic exposures at the plant.
    Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) 01/2013; 24(1):100-103. · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To compare the yield of hand-searching with optimised electronic search strategies in retrieving occupational health (OH) intervention studies published in a language other than English. The authors systematically hand-searched and screened reports of OH intervention studies published in Italian in peer-reviewed scientific journals between 1990 and 2008. The authors evaluated how many of them met the Cochrane Occupational Safety and Health Review Groups (OSHRG) definition of being an OH intervention study and how many potentially relevant studies retrieved by hand-searching would not be found by PubMed alone using the OSHRG's most specific and most sensitive search strings. Hand-searching retrieved 25 articles (reporting 27 studies), including nine not indexed in MEDLINE. Most studies (81%, 22/27) had a before-after design and only one was a randomised trial. The OSHRG's most sensitive search string retrieved all 16 articles published in the Italian language journals that were indexed in MEDLINE, while the most specific search strategy retrieved nine articles (56%, 9/16). The most specific search string showed a lower 'number needed to read' value than the most sensitive one (60 vs 132). These findings suggest that a sensitive electronic search strategy may be able to find most of the OH interventions published in languages other than English that are indexed in MEDLINE. Hand-searching of important national journals not indexed in MEDLINE should be considered when conducting particularly in-depth research.
    Occupational and environmental medicine 03/2012; 69(7):522-4. · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lifting heavy weights involves the Valsalva manoeuvre, which leads to intraocular pressure spikes. We used data from a case-control study to further investigate the hypothesis that occupational lifting is a risk factor for retinal detachment. The study population included 48 cases (patients operated for retinal detachment) and 84 controls (outpatients attending an eye clinic). The odds ratios (OR) of idiopathic retinal detachment were estimated with a logistic regression model (adjusted for age, sex and body mass index). Three indexes were used to examine exposure to lifting; 1) maximum load lifted, 2) average weekly lifting, 3) lifelong cumulative lifting. For all indexes, the most exposed subjects showed an increased risk of retinal detachment compared with the unexposed (index 1: OR 3.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-10.48; index 2: OR 3.24, 95% CI 1.32-7.97; index 3: OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.27-8.74) and dose-response relationships were apparent. These results reinforce the hypothesis that heavy occupational lifting may be a relevant risk factor for retinal detachment.
    Safety and health at work. 03/2012; 3(1):52-7.
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  • Occupational and Environmental Medicine 10/2011; 68(Suppl_1):A107-A107. · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Housework is a form of regular manual work that is often performed by women. Little is known about the entity of biomechanical exposure to the upper limbs during typical housework tasks. This study aims to make an initial quantitative estimate of some such exposures. We conducted objective assessments of biomechanical exposure to the upper limbs during nine frequent housework tasks performed by 12 women without domestic help. For the main evaluations, we implemented five instruments: the OCRA (Occupational Repetitive Actions) checklist; OREGE (Outil de Repérage et d'Evaluation des Gestes); the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) assessment of hand activity levels (HAL); RULA (Rapid Upper Limb Assessment); and the full checklist of the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries. The ACGIH evaluation suggested light/moderate biomechanical exposure levels, as did the RULA. For the OCRA checklist and OREGE, time-weighted average scores (not adjusted by a duration multiplier because women may also routinely undergo biomechanical loads in other domestic or professional settings) were: OCRA checklist, 12.0 ("mild risk", light red) and OREGE, 10.2 ("not recommended"). The full checklist of Washington State Department of Labor and Industries showed that repetitive/similar movements (for >2 h/day) accompanied by other risk factors such as ≥30° bending of the wrists, ≥45° stretched wrists, ≥30° ulnar stretches, and manual force. Housework commonly entails light-moderate biomechanical loads that nevertheless could conceivably contribute to the genesis/worsening of musculoskeletal disorders. Biomechanical loads experienced by women during housework deserve greater consideration in epidemiologic studies of musculoskeletal disorders.
    International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 08/2011; 85(4):421-5. · 2.10 Impact Factor
  • Physiotheraphy. 08/2011; 97:eS1001.
  • World Confederation for Physical Therapy, Amsterdam; 06/2011
  • XX International Congress of Sports Rehabilitation and Traumatology, Bologna; 03/2011
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this non-randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Global Postural Reeducation (GPR) program as compared to a Stabilization Exercise (SE) program in subjects with persistent low back pain (LBP) at short- and mid-term follow-up (ie. 3 and 6 months). According to inclusion and exclusion criteria, 100 patients with a primary complaint of persistent LBP were enrolled in the study: 50 were allocated to the GPR group and 50 to the SE group. Primary outcome measures were Roland and Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Secondary outcome measures were lumbar Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Fingertip-to-floor test (FFT). Data were collected at baseline and at 3/6 months by health care professionals unaware of the study. An intention to treat approach was used to analyze participants according to the group to which they were originally assigned. Of the 100 patients initially included in the study, 78 patients completed the study: 42 in the GPR group and 36 in the SE group. At baseline, the two groups did not differ significantly with respect to gender, age, BMI and outcome measures. Comparing the differences between groups at short- and mid-term follow-up, the GPR group revealed a significant reduction (from baseline) in all outcome measures with respect to the SE group.The ordered logistic regression model showed an increased likelihood of definitive improvement (reduction from baseline of at least 30% in RMDQ and VAS scores) for the GPR group compared to the SE group (OR 3.9, 95% CI 2.7 to 5.7). Our findings suggest that a GPR intervention in subjects with persistent LBP induces a greater improvement on pain and disability as compared to a SE program. These results must be confirmed by further studies with higher methodological standards, including randomization, larger sample size, longer follow-up and subgrouping of the LBP subjects. NCT00789204.
    BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 12/2010; 11:285. · 1.90 Impact Factor
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    BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 12/2010; · 1.90 Impact Factor
  • SIOT, Rome; 11/2010