Barry J Bedell

McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

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Publications (35)178.75 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Conventional brain connectivity analysis is typically based on the assessment of interregional correlations. Given that correlation coefficients are derived from both covariance and variance, group differences in covariance may be obscured by differences in the variance terms. To facilitate a comprehensive assessment of connectivity, we propose a unified statistical framework that interrogates the individual terms of the correlation coefficient. We have evaluated the utility of this method for metabolic connectivity analysis using [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. As an illustrative example of the utility of this approach, we examined metabolic connectivity in angular gyrus and precuneus seed regions of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects with low and high β-amyloid burdens. This new multivariate method allowed us to identify alterations in the metabolic connectome, which would not have been detected using classic seed-based correlation analysis. Ultimately, this novel approach should be extensible to brain network analysis and broadly applicable to other imaging modalities, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism advance online publication, 8 October 2014; doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2014.165.
    10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Abnormal neuronal accumulation and modification of TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) have recently been discovered to be defining histopathological features of particular subtypes of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and are also common in aging, particularly coexisting with hippocampal sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease pathology. This case report describes a 72 year old Hispanic male with no family history of neurological disease, who presented at age 59 with obsessive behavior, anxiety, agitation, and dysphasia. Positron emission tomography imaging using the amyloid ligand 18F florbetapir (Amyvid) was positive. Postmortem examination revealed frequent diffuse and neuritic amyloid plaques throughout the cerebral cortex, thalamus, and striatum, Braak stage II neurofibrillary degeneration, and frequent frontal and temporal cortex TDP-43-positive neurites with rare nuclear inclusions. The case is unusual and instructive because of the co-existence of frequent cortical and diencephalic amyloid plaques with extensive TDP-43-positive histopathology in the setting of early-onset dementia and because it demonstrates that a positive cortical amyloid imaging signal in a subject with dementia does not necessarily establish that Alzheimer's disease is the sole cause.
    Journal of Alzheimer's disease: JAD 06/2014; · 4.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hyperhomocysteinemia can contribute to cognitive impairment and brain atrophy. Methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) activates methionine synthase, which catalyzes homocysteine remethylation to methionine. Severe MTRR deficiency results in homocystinuria with cognitive and motor impairments. An MTRR polymorphism may influence homocysteine levels and reproductive outcomes. The goal of this study was to determine whether mild hyperhomocysteinemia impacts neurologic function in a mouse model with Mtrr deficiency. Three-month-old Mtrr+/+, Mtrr+/gt and Mtrrgt/gt mice were assessed for short-term memory, brain volumes and hippocampal morphology. We also measured DNA methylation, apoptosis, neurogenesis, choline metabolites and expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in hippocampus. Mtrrgt/gt mice exhibited short-term memory impairment on 2 tasks. They had global DNA hypomethylation and decreased choline, betaine and acetylcholine levels. Expression of ChAT and AChE was increased and decreased, respectively. At 3 weeks of age, they showed increased neurogenesis. In cerebellum, mutant mice had DNA hypomethylation, decreased choline and increased expression of ChAT. Our work demonstrates that mild hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with memory impairment. We propose a mechanism whereby a deficiency in methionine synthesis leads to hypomethylation and compensatory disturbances in choline metabolism in hippocampus. This disturbance affects the levels of acetylcholine, a critical neurotransmitter in learning and memory.
    Biochemical Journal 05/2014; · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Positron emission tomography (PET) studies using [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) have identified a well-defined pattern of glucose hypometabolism in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The assessment of the metabolic relationship among brain regions has the potential to provide unique information regarding the disease process. Previous studies of metabolic correlation patterns have demonstrated alterations in AD subjects relative to age-matched, healthy control subjects. The objective of this study was to examine the associations between β-amyloid, apolipoprotein E ɛ4 (APOE ɛ4) genotype, and metabolic correlations patterns in subjects diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Mild cognitive impairment subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study were categorized into β-amyloid-low and β-amyloid-high groups, based on quantitative analysis of [18F]florbetapir PET scans, and APOE ɛ4 non-carriers and carriers based on genotyping. We generated voxel-wise metabolic correlation strength maps across the entire cerebral cortex for each group, and, subsequently, performed a seed-based analysis. We found that the APOE ɛ4 genotype was closely related to regional glucose hypometabolism, while elevated, fibrillar β-amyloid burden was associated with specific derangements of the metabolic correlation patterns.Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism advance online publication, 16 April 2014; doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2014.66.
    Journal of cerebral blood flow and metabolism: official journal of the International Society of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 04/2014; · 5.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Persistent pain is a central characteristic of neuropathic pain conditions in humans. Knowing whether rodent models of neuropathic pain produce persistent pain is therefore crucial to their translational applicability. We investigated the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain and the formalin pain model in rats using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with the metabolic tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to determine if there is ongoing brain activity suggestive of persistent pain. For the formalin model, under brief anesthesia we injected one hindpaw with 5% formalin and the FDG tracer into a tail vein. We then allowed the animals to awaken and observed pain behavior for 30min during the FDG uptake period. The rat was then anesthetized and placed in the scanner for static image acquisition, which took place between minutes 45 and 75 post-tracer injection. A single reference rat brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) was used to align the PET images with the Paxinos and Watson rat brain atlas. Increased glucose metabolism was observed in the somatosensory region associated with the injection site (S1 hindlimb contralateral), S1 jaw/upper lip and cingulate cortex. Decreases were observed in the prelimbic cortex and hippocampus. Second, SNI rats were scanned 3 weeks post-surgery using the same scanning paradigm, and region-of-interest analyses revealed increased metabolic activity in the contralateral S1 hindlimb. Finally, a second cohort of SNI rats were scanned while anesthetized during the tracer uptake period, and the S1 hindlimb increase was not observed. Increased brain activity in the somatosensory cortex of SNI rats resembled the activity produced with the injection of formalin, suggesting that the SNI model may produce persistent pain. The lack of increased activity in S1 hindlimb with general anesthetic demonstrates that this effect can be blocked, as well as highlights the importance of investigating brain activity in awake and behaving rodents.
    NeuroImage 01/2014; · 6.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neuropathologic heterogeneity is often present among Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. We sought to determine whether amyloid imaging measures of AD are affected by concurrent pathologies. Thirty-eight clinically and pathologically defined AD and 17 nondemented patients with quantitative florbetapir F-18 (F-AV-45) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging during life and postmortem histological β-amyloid quantification and neuropathologic examination were assessed. AD patients were divided on the basis of concurrent pathologies, including those with Lewy bodies (LBs) (n = 21), white matter rarefaction (n = 27), severe cerebral amyloid angiopathy (n = 11), argyrophilic grains (n = 5), and TAR DNA binding protein-43 inclusions (n = 18). Many patients exhibited more than 1 type of concurrent pathology. The ratio of cortical to cerebellar amyloid imaging signal (SUVr) and immunohistochemical β-amyloid load were analyzed in 6 cortical regions of interest. All AD subgroups had strong and significant correlations between SUVr and histological β-amyloid measures (p < 0.001). All AD subgroups had significantly greater amyloid measures versus nondemented patients, and mean amyloid measures did not significantly differ between AD subgroups. When comparing AD cases with and without each pathology, AD cases with LBs had significantly lower SUVr measures versus AD cases without LBs (p = 0.002); there were no other paired comparison differences. These findings indicate that florbetapir-PET imaging is not confounded by neuropathological heterogeneity within AD.
    Journal of neuropathology and experimental neurology. 12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To define the functional significance of increased mir-155 expression in myeloid cells in multiple sclerosis. Methods: Mir-155 expression levels were measured in CD14+ monocytes from untreated RRMS patients and compared to healthy controls. Similar miRNA analyses were performed in laser-captured CD68+ cells from perivascular (blood-derived macrophages) and parenchymal (microglia) brain regions in both active MS lesions and non-inflammatory cases. Using human adult blood-derived macrophages and brain-derived microglia, in vitro experiments were performed to demonstrate how mir-155 influences polarization state, phenotype and functional properties of myeloid cells, in addition to their ability to subsequently impact adaptive T cell responses. Results: In multiple sclerosis, mir-155 expression was significantly increased in both peripheral circulating CD14+ monocytes and active lesions (CD68+ cells) compared to control donor monocytes and parenchymal microglia respectively. In vitro, mir-155 was significantly increased in both M1-polarized primary human macrophages and microglia. Transfection of a mir-155 mimic increased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and co-stimulatory surface marker expression in both cell types; mir-155 inhibitors decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Co-culture experiments demonstrated that allogeneic T cell responses were significantly enhanced in the presence of mir-155 transfected myeloid cells compared to controls. Interpretation: Our results demonstrate that mir-155 regulates pro-inflammatory responses in both blood-derived and CNS-resident myeloid cells, in addition to impacting subsequent adaptive immune responses. Differential miRNA expression may therefore provide insight into mechanisms responsible for distinct phenotypic and functional properties of myeloid cells, thus impacting their ability to influence CNS injury and repair. ANN NEUROL 2013. © 2013 American Neurological Association.
    Annals of Neurology 07/2013; · 11.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have identified aberrant cortical structure in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The association between MRI-derived cortical morphometry measures and β-amyloid, however, remains poorly understood. In this study, we explored the potential relationship between early alterations in cortical thickness and later stage β-amyloid deposition, using a novel approach, in a transgenic AD mouse model. We acquired longitudinal anatomical MRI scans from mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice and age-matched wild-type mice at 1 and 3.5 months-of-age, and employed fully-automated image processing methods to derive objective, quantitative measures of cortical thickness on a region-of-interest basis. We also generated 3D quantitative immunohistochemistry (qIHC) volumes of deposited β-amyloid burden from 18 month-old transgenic mice using an automated, production-level process. These studies revealed thinner cortex in most regions in the 1 month-old transgenic mice relative to age-matched wild-types, with the exception of the frontal, perirhinal/entorhinal, posterior cingulate, and retrosplenial cortical regions. Betweeen 1 and 3.5 months-of-age, the transgenic mice demonstrated stable or increasing cortical thickness, while the wild-type mice showed cortical thinning. Based on data from co-registered 3D MRI and qIHC volumes, we identified an association between abnormal, early, regional cortical thickness change over 2.5 months and later β-amyloid deposition. These observations suggest that the spatio-temporal pattern of early (pre-plaque) alterations in cerebral cortical structure is indicative of regional predisposition to later β-amyloid pathology in a transgenic AD mouse model.
    Neurobiology of Disease 02/2013; · 5.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Magnetic resonance imaging studies have revealed distinct patterns of cortical atrophy and hypoperfusion in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The relationship between these in vivo imaging measures and the corresponding underlying pathophysiological changes, however, remains elusive. Recently, attention has turned to neuroimaging of mouse models of Alzheimer's disease in which imaging-pathological correlations can be readily performed. In this study, anatomical and arterial spin labeling perfusion magnetic resonance imaging scans of amyloid precursor protein transgenic and age-matched wild-type mice were acquired at 3, 12, and 18 months of age. Fully-automated image processing methods were used to derive quantitative measures of cortical thickness and perfusion. These studies revealed increased regional cortical thickness in young transgenic mice relative to age-matched wild-type mice. However, the transgenic mice generally demonstrated a greater rate of cortical thinning over 15 months. Cortical perfusion was significantly reduced in young transgenic mice in comparison with wild-type mice across most brain regions. Previously unreported regional genotype differences and age-related changes in cortical thickness and cerebral perfusion were identified in amyloid precursor protein transgenic and wild-type mice.
    Neurobiology of aging 12/2012; · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Results of previous studies have shown associations between PET imaging of amyloid plaques and amyloid-β pathology measured at autopsy. However, these studies were small and not designed to prospectively measure sensitivity or specificity of amyloid PET imaging against a reference standard. We therefore prospectively compared the sensitivity and specificity of amyloid PET imaging with neuropathology at autopsy. This study was an extension of our previous imaging-to-autopsy study of participants recruited at 22 centres in the USA who had a life expectancy of less than 6 months at enrolment. Participants had autopsy within 2 years of PET imaging with florbetapir ((18)F). For one of the primary analyses, the interpretation of the florbetapir scans (majority interpretation of five nuclear medicine physicians, who classified each scan as amyloid positive or amyloid negative) was compared with amyloid pathology (assessed according to the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease standards, and classed as amyloid positive for moderate or frequent plaques or amyloid negative for no or sparse plaques); correlation of the image analysis results with amyloid burden was tested as a coprimary endpoint. Correlation, sensitivity, and specificity analyses were also done in the subset of participants who had autopsy within 1 year of imaging as secondary endpoints. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT 01447719 (original study NCT 00857415). We included 59 participants (aged 47-103 years; cognitive status ranging from normal to advanced dementia). The sensitivity and specificity of florbetapir PET imaging for detection of moderate to frequent plaques were 92% (36 of 39; 95% CI 78-98) and 100% (20 of 20; 80-100%), respectively, in people who had autopsy within 2 years of PET imaging, and 96% (27 of 28; 80-100%) and 100% (18 of 18; 78-100%), respectively, for those who had autopsy within 1 year. Amyloid assessed semiquantitatively with florbetapir PET was correlated with the post-mortem amyloid burden in the participants who had an autopsy within 2 years (Spearman ρ=0·76; p<0·0001) and within 12 months between imaging and autopsy (0·79; p<0·0001). The results of this study validate the binary visual reading method approved in the USA for clinical use with florbetapir and suggest that florbetapir could be used to distinguish individuals with no or sparse amyloid plaques from those with moderate to frequent plaques. Additional research is needed to understand the prognostic implications of moderate to frequent plaque density. Avid Radiopharmaceuticals.
    The Lancet Neurology 06/2012; 11(8):669-78. · 23.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The brain is particularly sensitive to folate metabolic disturbances, since methyl groups are critical for its functions. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) generates the primary circulatory form of folate required for homocysteine remethylation to methionine. Neurological disturbances have been described in homocystinuria caused by severe MTHFR deficiency. The goal of this study was to determine if behavioral anomalies are present in severe Mthfr-deficient (Mthfr(-/-)) mice and to identify neurobiological changes that could contribute to these anomalies. Adult male mice of 3 Mthfr genotypes (+/+, +/-, -/-) were tested on motor, anxiety, exploratory and cognitive tasks. Volumes (whole brain and hippocampus) and morphology, global DNA methylation, apoptosis, expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and concentrations of choline metabolites were assessed in hippocampus. Mthfr(-/-) mice had impairments in motor function and in short- and long-term memory, increased exploratory behavior and decreased anxiety. They showed decreased whole brain and hippocampal volumes, reduced thickness of the pyramidal cell layer of CA1 and CA3, and increased apoptosis in hippocampus. There was a disturbance in choline metabolism as manifested by differences in acetylcholine, betaine or glycerophosphocholine concentrations, and by increased ChAT levels. Mthfr(-/-) mice also had increased GR mRNA and protein. Our study has revealed significant anomalies in affective behavior and impairments in memory of Mthfr(-/-) mice. We identified structural changes, increased apoptosis, altered choline metabolism and GR dysregulation in hippocampus. These findings, as well as some similar observations in cerebellum, could contribute to the behavioral changes and suggest that choline is a critical metabolite in homocystinuria.
    Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 04/2012; 106(2):149-59. · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Florbetapir F 18 (F-AV-45) is a positron emission tomography imaging ligand for the detection of amyloid aggregation associated with Alzheimer disease. Earlier data showed that florbetapir F 18 binds with high affinity to β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in human brain homogenates (Kd=3.7 nM) and has favorable imaging pharmacokinetic properties, including rapid brain penetration and washout. This study used human autopsy brain tissue to evaluate the correlation between in vitro florbetapir F 18 binding and Aβ density measured by established neuropathologic methods. The localization and density of florbetapir F 18 binding in frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of postmortem brain tissue from 40 patients with a varying degree of neurodegenerative pathology was assessed by standard florbetapir F 18 autoradiography and correlated with the localization and density of Aβ identified by silver staining, thioflavin S staining, and immunohistochemistry. There were strong quantitative correlations between florbetapir F 18 tissue binding and both Aβ plaques identified by light microscopy (Silver staining and thioflavin S fluorescence) and by immunohistochemical measurements of Aβ using 3 antibodies recognizing different epitopes of the Aβ peptide. Florbetapir F 18 did not bind to neurofibrillary tangles. Florbetapir F 18 selectively binds Aβ in human brain tissue. The binding intensity was quantitatively correlated with the density of Aβ plaques identified by standard neuropathologic techniques and correlated with the density of Aβ measured by immunohistochemistry. As Aβ plaques are a defining neuropathologic feature for Alzheimer disease, these results support the use of florbetapir F 18 as an amyloid positron emission tomography ligand to identify the presence of Alzheimer disease pathology in patients with signs and symptoms of progressive late-life cognitive impairment.
    Alzheimer disease and associated disorders 01/2012; 26(1):8-16. · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although significant improvements have been made regarding the visualization and characterization of cortical multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cortical lesions (CL) continue to be under-detected in vivo, and we have a limited understanding of the causes of GM pathology. The objective of this study was to characterize the MRI signature of CLs to help interpret the changes seen in vivo and elucidate the factors limiting their visualization. A quantitative 3D high-resolution (350 μm isotropic) MRI study at 3 Tesla of a fixed post mortem cerebral hemisphere from a patient with MS is presented in combination with matched immunohistochemistry. Type III subpial lesions are characterized by an increase in T1, T2 and M0, and a decrease in MTR in comparison to the normal appearing cortex (NAC). All quantitative MR parameters were associated with cortical GM myelin content, while T1 showed the strongest correlation. The histogram analysis showed extensive overlap between CL and NAC for all MR parameters and myelin content. This is due to the poor contrast in myelin content between CL and NAC in comparison to the variability in myelo-architecture throughout the healthy cortex. This latter comparison is highlighted by the representation of T1 times on cortical surfaces at several laminar depths.
    Multiple sclerosis international. 01/2012; 2012:742018.
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    ABSTRACT: Insulin regulates glucose uptake by normal tissues. Although there is evidence that certain cancers are growth-stimulated by insulin, the possibility that insulin influences tumor glucose uptake as assessed by ( 18) F-2-Fluoro-2-Deoxy-d-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET) has not been studied in detail. We present a model of diet-induced hyperinsulinemia associated with increased insulin receptor activation in neoplastic tissue and with increased tumor FDG-PET image intensity. Metformin abolished the diet-induced increases in serum insulin level, tumor insulin receptor activation and tumor FDG uptake associated with the high energy diet but had no effect on these measurements in mice on a control diet. These findings provide the first functional imaging correlate of the well-known adverse effect of caloric excess on cancer outcome. They demonstrate that, for a subset of neoplasms, diet and insulin are variables that affect tumor FDG uptake and have implications for design of clinical trials of metformin as an antineoplastic agent.
    Cell cycle (Georgetown, Tex.) 08/2011; 10(16):2770-8. · 5.24 Impact Factor
  • Alzheimer's and Dementia 07/2011; 7(4). · 17.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The ability to identify and quantify brain β-amyloid could increase the accuracy of a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer disease. To determine if florbetapir F 18 positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging performed during life accurately predicts the presence of β-amyloid in the brain at autopsy. Prospective clinical evaluation conducted February 2009 through March 2010 of florbetapir-PET imaging performed on 35 patients from hospice, long-term care, and community health care facilities near the end of their lives (6 patients to establish the protocol and 29 to validate) compared with immunohistochemistry and silver stain measures of brain β-amyloid after their death used as the reference standard. PET images were also obtained in 74 young individuals (18-50 years) presumed free of brain amyloid to better understand the frequency of a false-positive interpretation of a florbetapir-PET image. Correlation of florbetapir-PET image interpretation (based on the median of 3 nuclear medicine physicians' ratings) and semiautomated quantification of cortical retention with postmortem β-amyloid burden, neuritic amyloid plaque density, and neuropathological diagnosis of Alzheimer disease in the first 35 participants autopsied (out of 152 individuals enrolled in the PET pathological correlation study). Florbetapir-PET imaging was performed a mean of 99 days (range, 1-377 days) before death for the 29 individuals in the primary analysis cohort. Fifteen of the 29 individuals (51.7%) met pathological criteria for Alzheimer disease. Both visual interpretation of the florbetapir-PET images and mean quantitative estimates of cortical uptake were correlated with presence and quantity of β-amyloid pathology at autopsy as measured by immunohistochemistry (Bonferroni ρ, 0.78 [95% confidence interval, 0.58-0.89]; P <.001]) and silver stain neuritic plaque score (Bonferroni ρ, 0.71 [95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.86]; P <.001). Florbetapir-PET images and postmortem results rated as positive or negative for β-amyloid agreed in 96% of the 29 individuals in the primary analysis cohort. The florbetapir-PET image was rated as amyloid negative in the 74 younger individuals in the nonautopsy cohort. Florbetapir-PET imaging was correlated with the presence and density of β-amyloid. These data provide evidence that a molecular imaging procedure can identify β-amyloid pathology in the brains of individuals during life. Additional studies are required to understand the appropriate use of florbetapir-PET imaging in the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer disease and for the prediction of progression to dementia.
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 01/2011; 305(3):275-83. · 29.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: TLN-4601 is a farnesylated dibenzodiazepinone isolated from Micromonospora sp. with an antiproliferative effect on several human cancer cell lines. Although the mechanism of action of TLN-4601 is unknown, our earlier work indicated that TLN-4601 binds the PBR (peripheral benzodiazepine receptor; more recently known as the translocator protein or TSPO), an 18 kDa protein associated with the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) pore. While the exact function of the PBR remains a matter of debate, it has been implicated in heme and steroid synthesis, cellular growth and differentiation, oxygen consumption and apoptosis. Using the Jurkat immortalized T-lymphocyte cell line, documented to have negligible PBR expression, and Jurkat cells stably transfected with a human PBR cDNA, the present study demonstrates that TLN-4601 induces apoptosis independently of PBR expression. As PBRs are overexpressed in brain tumors compared to normal brain, we examined if TLN-4601 would preferentially accumulate in tumors using an intra-cerebral tumor model. Our results demonstrate the ability of TLN-4601 to effectively bind the PBR in vivo as determined by competitive binding assay and receptor occupancy. Analysis of TLN-4601 tissue and plasma indicated that TLN-4601 preferentially accumulates in the tumor. Indeed, drug levels were 200-fold higher in the tumor compared to the normal brain. TLN-4601 accumulation in the tumor (176 μg/g) was also significant compared to liver (24.8 μg/g; 7-fold) and plasma (16.2 μg/mL; 11-fold). Taken together our data indicate that while PBR binding does not mediate cell growth inhibition and apoptosis, PBR binding may allow for the specific accumulation of TLN-4601 in PBR positive tumors.
    Biochemical pharmacology 11/2010; 80(10):1572-9. · 4.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Three β-galactosidase-specific nitric-oxide-releasing diazeniumdiolate conjugated probes were prepared as a prelude to studies of new potential molecular MRI imaging agents. A glycosylated derivative, 2e, designed to be trafficked across cell membranes, was also prepared. We report, in detail, the synthesis and characterization of these probes. In addition, the release of diazeniumdiolate from the probes by β-galactosidase-catalyzed hydrolysis was used to estimate their efficacy as serum-stable, specific NO donors.
    Canadian Journal of Chemistry 08/2010; 88(9):969-980. · 0.96 Impact Factor
  • Alzheimer's and Dementia 07/2010; 6(4). · 17.47 Impact Factor
  • Alzheimers & Dementia - ALZHEIMERS DEMENT. 01/2010; 6(4).

Publication Stats

445 Citations
178.75 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008–2014
    • McGill University
      • • Alan Edwards Centre for Research on Pain (AECRP)
      • • Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery
      • • McConnell Brain Imaging Centre
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2010
    • Biospective, Inc.
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada