Dennis R Ownby

Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia, United States

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Publications (219)968.12 Total impact

  • The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology. 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Recent research has emphasized the need to better discriminate asthma phenotypes and consider underlying mechanistic endotypes in epidemiologic and clinical studies. Although allergic asthma and nonallergic asthma are frequently combined into 1 disease category in observational research and clinical trials, few studies have investigated the extent to which these 2 separate phenotypes are associated with distinct cytokine immunologic profiles in a representative young adult population. To investigate the cytokine production-based endotypes underlying the clinical phenotypes of allergic and nonallergic asthma in a population-based birth cohort evaluated as young adults. Participants included 18- to 21-year-old members (n = 540) of a suburban Detroit birth cohort study, the Childhood Allergy Study. Phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated whole blood interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, and interferon-γ secretory responses were analyzed for associations comparing participants with allergic vs nonallergic asthma phenotypes with those without asthma. T-helper cell type (TH) 2-polarized responses, measured as higher mean IL-5 and IL-13 secretions and lower ratios of interferon-γ and IL-12 to 3 TH2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, or IL-13), were observed only in participants with allergic asthma. Nonallergic asthma was associated with TH1-polarized responses, including higher adjusted interferon-γ secretion compared with participants with allergic asthma and, surprisingly, those without asthma (odds ratio 2.5, confidence interval 1.2-5.1, P < .01). As expected, young adults with a history of an allergic asthma phenotype exhibited a TH2-polarized cytokine response after polyclonal stimulation. However, TH1 polarization was observed in patients with a history of nonallergic asthma. Allergic and nonallergic asthma are associated with etiologically distinct immune endotypes, underscoring the importance of discriminating these endotypes in research analyses and clinical management.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 05/2014; · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Population-based birth cohorts on asthma and allergies increasingly provide new insights into the development and natural history of the diseases. More than 130 birth cohorts focusing on asthma and allergy have been initiated in the last 30 years. A National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Mechanisms of the Development of Allergy (MeDALL; Framework Programme 7 of the European Commission) joint workshop was held in Bethesda, Maryland, on September 11-12, 2012, with 3 objectives: (1) documenting the knowledge that asthma/allergy birth cohorts have provided, (2) identifying the knowledge gaps and inconsistencies, and (3) developing strategies for moving forward, including potential new study designs and the harmonization of existing asthma birth cohort data. The meeting was organized around the presentations of 5 distinct workgroups: (1) clinical phenotypes, (2) risk factors, (3) immune development of asthma and allergy, (4) pulmonary development, and (5) harmonization of existing birth cohorts. This article presents the workgroup reports and provides Web links (AsthmaBirthCohorts.niaid.nih.gov or www.medall-fp7.eu), where the reader will find tables describing the characteristics of the birth cohorts included in this report, the type of data collected at differing ages, and a selected bibliography provided by the participating birth cohorts.
    The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology 03/2014; · 12.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Clinical trials are critical for medical decision-making, however, under the current paradigm, clinical trials are fraught with problems including low enrollment and high cost. Promising alternatives to increase trial efficiency and reduce costs include the use of (1) electronic initiatives that permit electronic remote data capture (EDC) for direct data collection at a site (2), electronic medical records (EMR) for patient identification and data collection, and (3) adaptive, enrichment designs with pragmatic approaches. We describe the design of a seamless, multi-site randomized Phase II/III trial to evaluate an asthma management intervention in urban adolescents with asthma. Patients are randomized, asked to access four online sessions of the intervention or control asthma management program, and are then followed for one year. The primary efficacy endpoint is self-reported asthma control as measured by the Asthma Control Test (ACT). Comparative effectiveness parametric approaches are utilized to conduct the trial in a real world setting with reduced costs. Escalated electronic initiatives are implemented for patient identification, assent, enrollment and tracking. Patient enrollment takes place during primary care visits. A centralized database with EDC is used for CRF data collection with integration of EMR data. This Phase II/II trial plans to have a total sample size of 500 patients with an interim look at the completion of Phase II (n=250), The interim analyses include an assessment of the intervention effect, marker(s) identification and the feasibility study of EMR data as the trial CRF data collection. Patient enrollment has begun and is ongoing.
    Contemporary clinical trials 03/2014; · 1.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The infant gut's ability to suppress immunologic reactions to food proteins could be influenced by levels of TGFβ in breast milk. We hypothesized that lower levels of TGFβ1 in the breast milk (BM) of mothers in the WHEALS birth cohort are associated with atopy at infant age 2-3 yrs. We used data collected during infancy in addition to the results of skin prick tests (SPT+) and measures of specific IgE >0.35 IU/ml (spIgE) to milk, egg, and peanut at infant age 2-3 years. Infants were classified as food allergic (FA) based on parental report of infant symptoms/diagnoses and information from clinical assessments. Data for 304 cohort members were analyzed. Among non-black infants, BM-TGFβ1 was lower for those classified as FA (vs. no FA) and those SPT+ (vs., SPT-), geometric mean = 1100 pg/ml vs. 1417pg/ml, p = 0.081; and 1100 pg/ml vs. 1415pg/ml, p = 0.064, respectively. Among infants of non-atopic mothers, BM-TGFβ1 was lower for those with elevated (vs. not elevated) sIgE, geometric mean = 1347 pg/ml vs. 1651 pg/ml, p = 0.047. Using logistic regression, adjusted odds ratios describing the association of BM-TGFβ1 to the presence of atopic indicators in the infant were in the hypothesized direction only for non-black infants of non-atopic mothers: aORs for FA, sIgE and SPT+ were 0.08, 0.34, and 0.26 respectively; p = 0.091, 0.13, and 0.23. Immune benefit of BM-TGFβ1 could inform prevention strategies. Evidence of an association appears greatly influenced by infant race and maternal atopy. More research can determine if these relationships represent a modifiable risk factor for the development of food allergy in certain subgroups.
    Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 02/2014; · 3.38 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 01/2014; 133(2):AB6.
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    ABSTRACT: Background Atopic sensitization (ie, atopy) is the most commonly reported risk factor for asthma. Recent studies have begun to suggest that atopy, as conventionally defined, might be an umbrella term that obfuscates more specific allergic disease types. Objective We sought to determine whether distinct and meaningful atopic phenotypes exist within a racially diverse birth cohort using 10 allergen-specific serum IgE (sIgE) measurements from children aged 2 years. Methods Using the Wayne County Health, Environment, Allergy and Asthma Longitudinal Study (WHEALS) birth cohort (62% black), we analyzed sIgE data on 10 allergens (Dermatophagoides farinae, dog, cat, timothy grass, ragweed, Alternaria alternata, egg, peanut, milk, and German cockroach) obtained from 594 children at age 2 years. Conventional atopy was defined as at least 1 sIgE level of 0.35 IU/mL or greater. Results A 4-class solution (latent class model) was the best fit. Class types were labeled “low to no sensitization” (76.9% of sample), “highly sensitized” (2.7%), “milk and egg dominated” (15.3%), and “peanut and inhalant(s)” (5.1%). Almost one third (32.2%) of the low to no sensitization group met the criteria for conventional atopy. The highly sensitized group was significantly associated with a doctor's diagnosis of asthma after age 4 years (odds ratio [OR], 5.3; 95% CI, 1.6-17.4), whereas the milk and egg dominated and peanut and inhalant(s) groups were not (ORs of 1.6 [95% CI, 0.8-3.0] and 1.8 [95% CI, 0.6-4.9], respectively). Children of black race were more likely to be in the 3 multisensitized groups (P = .04). Conclusion Classification by sIgE patterns defined groups whose membership is more strongly associated with atopic dermatitis, wheeze, and asthma compared with conventional atopy.
    The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology 01/2014; · 12.05 Impact Factor
  • Annals of Epidemiology. 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: There is consistent evidence demonstrating that pet-keeping, particularly of dogs, is beneficial to human health. We explored relationships between maternal race and prenatal dog-keeping, accounting for measures of socioeconomic status that could affect the choice of owning a pet, in a demographically diverse, unselected birth cohort. Self-reported data on mothers' race, socioeconomic characteristics and dog-keeping practices were obtained during prenatal interviews and analyzed cross-sectionally. Robust methods of covariate balancing via propensity score analysis were utilized to examine if race (Black vs White), independent of other participant traits, influenced prenatal dog-keeping. A birth cohort study conducted in a health care system in metropolitan Detroit, Michigan between September 2003 and November 2007. 1065 pregnant women (n=775 or 72.8% Black), between ages 21 and 45, receiving prenatal care. Participant's self-report of race/ethnicity and prenatal dog-keeping, which was defined as her owning or caring for > or =1 dog for more than 1 week at her home since learning of her pregnancy, regardless of whether the dog was kept inside or outside of her home. In total, 294 women (27.6%) reported prenatal dog-keeping. Prenatal dog-keeping was significantly lower among Black women as compared to White women (20.9% vs 45.5%, P<.001), and remained significantly different even after propensity score analysis was applied. Findings suggest that there are persistent racial differences in dog-keeping not fully explained by measures of socioeconomic status. Racial differences in prenatal dog-keeping may contribute to childhood health disparities.
    Ethnicity & disease 01/2014; 24(1):104-9. · 1.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Recent research has emphasized the need to better discriminate asthma phenotypes and consider underlying mechanistic endotypes in epidemiologic and clinical studies. Although allergic asthma and nonallergic asthma are frequently combined into 1 disease category in observational research and clinical trials, few studies have investigated the extent to which these 2 separate phenotypes are associated with distinct cytokine immunologic profiles in a representative young adult population. Objective To investigate the cytokine production-based endotypes underlying the clinical phenotypes of allergic and nonallergic asthma in a population-based birth cohort evaluated as young adults. Methods Participants included 18- to 21-year-old members (n = 540) of a suburban Detroit birth cohort study, the Childhood Allergy Study. Phorbol myristate acetate–stimulated whole blood interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, and interferon-γ secretory responses were analyzed for associations comparing participants with allergic vs nonallergic asthma phenotypes with those without asthma. Results T-helper cell type (TH) 2-polarized responses, measured as higher mean IL-5 and IL-13 secretions and lower ratios of interferon-γ and IL-12 to 3 TH2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, or IL-13), were observed only in participants with allergic asthma. Nonallergic asthma was associated with TH1-polarized responses, including higher adjusted interferon-γ secretion compared with participants with allergic asthma and, surprisingly, those without asthma (odds ratio 2.5, confidence interval 1.2–5.1, P < .01). Conclusion As expected, young adults with a history of an allergic asthma phenotype exhibited a TH2–polarized cytokine response after polyclonal stimulation. However, TH1 polarization was observed in patients with a history of nonallergic asthma. Allergic and nonallergic asthma are associated with etiologically distinct immune endotypes, underscoring the importance of discriminating these endotypes in research analyses and clinical management.
    Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Exposure to dogs in early infancy has been shown to reduce the risk of childhood allergic disease development, and dog ownership is associated with a distinct house dust microbial exposure. Here, we demonstrate, using murine models, that exposure of mice to dog-associated house dust protects against ovalbumin or cockroach allergen-mediated airway pathology. Protected animals exhibited significant reduction in the total number of airway T cells, down-regulation of Th2-related airway responses, as well as mucin secretion. Following dog-associated dust exposure, the cecal microbiome of protected animals was extensively restructured with significant enrichment of, amongst others, Lactobacillus johnsonii. Supplementation of wild-type animals with L. johnsonii protected them against both airway allergen challenge or infection with respiratory syncytial virus. L. johnsonii-mediated protection was associated with significant reductions in the total number and proportion of activated CD11c(+)/CD11b(+) and CD11c(+)/CD8(+) cells, as well as significantly reduced airway Th2 cytokine expression. Our results reveal that exposure to dog-associated household dust results in protection against airway allergen challenge and a distinct gastrointestinal microbiome composition. Moreover, the study identifies L. johnsonii as a pivotal species within the gastrointestinal tract capable of influencing adaptive immunity at remote mucosal surfaces in a manner that is protective against a variety of respiratory insults.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 12/2013; · 9.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It is unknown whether family members with detectable specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE) and/or allergic symptoms to pets are more or less likely to reside in a household with pets. We cross-sectionally investigated potential relationships between family members' allergic sensitization and symptoms to dogs and cats and current household pet-keeping practices, using birth cohort data. Blood samples taken from children enrolled in a birth cohort and their biological mothers and fathers, when the children were aged 18 years, were assessed for sIgE to dog and cat allergens. Interviews assessed subjects' self-reported pet exposure symptoms, current household pet-keeping practices, and socioeconomic characteristics. Overall, household dog or cat keeping was not associated with sIgE to these animals and/or self-reported allergic symptoms in the presence of these animals, even after controlling for factors such as education and household income. In subgroup analyses, current household dog keeping among dog-symptomatic teens (n = 40) was significantly lower than among teens who were not dog symptomatic (n = 289), at 48.8 and 61.1%, respectively (p = 0.036). Current household cat keeping was significantly lower among cat-symptomatic mothers (n = 27) compared with mothers who were not cat symptomatic (n = 120), at 24.3 and 37.0%, respectively (p = 0.015). However, when considering those who were both sensitized and reported symptoms, only the mother and cat-keeping associations persisted (p = 0.049). When cat-sensitized mothers report allergic symptoms to cats, these pets may be less likely to be kept in homes. Elevated dog and cat allergen sIgE does not appear to be associated with the keeping of these pets.
    Allergy and Asthma Proceedings 11/2013; 34(6):504-10. · 2.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Environmental allergens may induce the generation of allergen-specific IgE (sIgE) and IgG4 (sIgG4). Some studies report an association of sIgG4 to protection against allergic symptoms after exposure to the relevant allergen. Objective We examined the relationship of dog and cat sIgE and sIgG4 levels to self-reported allergic symptoms on pet contact. Methods Participants 18 years of age in the Detroit Childhood Allergy Study cohort were asked whether they experienced symptoms on exposure to cats and dogs. Serum was assayed for cat and dog sIgE and sIgG4. Geometric means, ratios of cat and dog sIgE, sIgG4, and ratios of sIgG4/sIgE were compared between symptomatic and asymptomatic teens with the use of Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Ratios of sIgG4/sIgE, adjusted for presence of sIgE (≥0.35 kU/mL), were analyzed with logistic regression. Results Data on 500 participants were analyzed. Compared with asymptomatic teens, teens symptomatic with cat exposure had higher cat sIgE, sIgG4, and lower ratio of sIgG4/sIgE. Teens symptomatic after dog exposure had higher dog sIgE levels and lower sIgG4/sIgE, but similar levels of sIgG4 compared with asymptomatic participants. Increasing cat and dog sIgG4/sIgE ratios were associated with a lower likelihood of reporting allergic symptoms (cat: adjusted odds ratio, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.6-0.9; dog: adjusted odds ratio, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.7-1.0). Conclusion sIgG4 levels to cat and dog allergens correlate with lower rates of pet-induced allergic symptoms when interpreted in the context of concomitant sIgE. However, sIgG4 appears to have little utility as an isolated marker to indicate that pet exposure will be well tolerated.
    The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice. 01/2013; 1(4):350–353.
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    ABSTRACT: In patients with asthma, medication adherence is a voluntary behavior that can be affected by numerous factors. Depression is an important co-morbidity in adolescents with asthma that may significantly impact their controller medication adherence and other asthma-related outcomes. The modifying effect of depressive symptoms on an asthma intervention's ability to improve asthma controller medication adherence among urban adolescents with asthma has not yet been reported. To assess self-reported symptoms of depression as an effect modifier of the relationship between randomization group and controller medication adherence at 6-month follow-up. These analyses use data from a randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted in Detroit high schools to evaluate a tailored asthma management program. The intervention included referrals to school or community resources for students reporting symptoms of depression and other issues. "Elevated depressive symptoms" was defined as a positive answer to ≥ 5 of 7 questions from a validated tool included on the baseline questionnaire. Self-reported adherence to controller medication was collected at intervention onset (session 1) and at 6-month follow up. Analyses were restricted to students with report of a controller medication at baseline. Logistic regression was used to assess elevated depressive symptoms as an effect modifier of the relationship between randomization group and 6-month adherence. Of the 422 students enrolled in the RCT, a controller medication was reported at intervention onset by n = 123 adolescents (29%). Analyzing this group, we observed an interaction between elevated depressive symptoms and adherence (p = 0.073). Stratified analysis showed better adherence in treatment group adolescents meeting criteria for elevated depressive symptoms at baseline as compared to the control group (adjusted Odds Ratio [aOR] = 9.50; p = 0.024). For adolescents without elevated depressive symptoms at baseline, differences in adherence by group assignment did not reach statistical significance (aOR 1.40, p = 0.49). In this sample of students reporting controller medications at baseline, report of elevated depressive symptoms at baseline and randomization to the intervention group was associated with significantly better adherence at 6-month follow up when compared to that of a control group. Larger studies are needed to evaluate the impact of depression on the relationship between adherence and asthma intervention effectiveness.
    Allergy Asthma and Clinical Immunology 01/2013; 9(1):45.
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    ABSTRACT: The relationship between obesity and asthma is an area of debate. To investigate the association of elevated body mass index (BMI) at a young age and young adult asthma. BMI, questionnaires, and serologic tests results were analyzed in participants of a predominantly white, middle-class, population-based birth cohort from Detroit, Michigan at 6 to 8 and 18 years of age. Asthma diagnosis was based on medical record data. Allergen specific IgE was analyzed using UniCAP, with atopy defined as 1 or more allergen specific IgE levels of 0.35 kU/L or higher. Overweight was defined as a BMI in 85th percentile or higher. A total of 10.6% of overweight males at 6 to 8 years of age had current asthma at 18 to 20 years of age compared with 3.2% of males who were normal or underweight (relative risk [RR], 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-11.0; P=.048). A total of 19.6% of females who were overweight at 6 to 8 years of age had asthma compared with 10.3% of females who were normal or underweight (RR, 1.9; 95% CI, 0.9-3.9; P=.09). After adjustment for atopy at 6 to 8 years of age, overweight males had an adjusted RR of 4.7 (95% CI, 1.4-16.2; P=.01), and overweight females had an adjusted RR of 1.7 (95% CI, 0.8-3.3; P=.15). Change in BMI between 6 to 8 years of age and 18 to 20 years of age was also examined. Patients with persistently elevated BMI exhibited increased risk of asthma as young adults (RR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.2-4.7) but not with an increasing BMI (RR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.3-2.2) or a decreasing BMI (RR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.3-2.2). Overweight males 6 to 8 years of age have increased risk of asthma as young adults. Being overweight remains a predictor of asthma after adjustment for early atopy. A similar but not statistically significant trend was also seen among overweight females. Overweight body habitus throughout childhood is a risk factor for young adult asthma.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 12/2012; 109(6):408-411.e1. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have suggested that exposure to cats and dogs during early childhood reduces the risk of allergic disease, possibly by increasing home endotoxin exposure. This study asked the question of whether cats and dogs are the dominant influence on dust endotoxin concentrations in homes after considering other variables reportedly associated with endotoxin. The presence of cats or dogs in homes, household and home characteristics, and dust endotoxin concentrations from 5 locations were assessed in 966 urban and suburban homes. Whether considered together as pets or as cats and dogs separately, the presence of cats and dogs significantly contributed to living room and bedroom floor endotoxin concentrations but not to bed endotoxin concentrations. However, the two variables consistently related to endotoxin in all home sites were the home occupant density (occupants/room) and cleanliness of the home. Our data suggests that reducing occupant density and improving home cleanliness would reduce home endotoxin concentrations more than removing pet cats or dogs from the home. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
    Indoor Air 11/2012; · 3.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Asthma is more common in black children than in white children. Allergic sensitization has been shown to be associated with increased likelihood of asthma. This study was designed to determine whether there are racial differences in the allergens to which children are sensitized in the Detroit metropolitan area and determine whether sensitization was associated with wheeze outcomes. Pregnant women were recruited for the Wayne County Health, Environment, Allergy, and Asthma Longitudinal Study birth cohort to follow the health of their children in the Detroit metropolitan area. Specific IgE (sIgE) was measured for Alternaria, cat, cockroach, dog, Dermatophagoides farinae, short ragweed, timothy grass, egg, milk, and peanut in blood samples from the children at age 2 years. A positive allergen sIgE was defined as ≥0.35 IU/mL. Mothers reported their child's race and completed interviews at age 2 years about characteristics of wheezing episodes in their child (frequency, medication, acute care, or emergency department visit). Black children (n = 384) were more likely than white children (n = 180) to have been positive for each of the allergens tested and also tended to have positive responses to a greater number of allergens (four or more allergens: 9.2% versus 3.5%). Children who had two or more positive sIgEs (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.68; 95% 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33, 5.46) or three or more positive sIgEs (aOR = 2.67, 95% CI, 1.19, 6.01) were more likely to have wheezed four or more times in the last 12 months. Racial differences in sensitization at this young age may contribute to the racial difference in asthma prevalence at later ages.
    Allergy and Asthma Proceedings 11/2012; 33(6):493-9. · 2.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The literature suggests that depression is an important comorbidity in asthma that can significantly influence disease management and quality of life (QOL). OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of coexisting depressive symptoms on the effectiveness of self-management interventions in urban teens with asthma. METHODS: We analyzed data from a randomized controlled trial of Puff City, a web-based, tailored asthma management intervention for urban teens, to determine whether depression modulated intervention effectiveness for asthma control and QOL outcomes. Teens and caregivers were classified as depressed based on responses collected from baseline questionnaires. RESULT: Using logistic regression analysis, we found that a lower percentage of treatment students had indicators of uncontrolled asthma compared with controls (adjusted odds ratios <1). However, for teens depressed at baseline, QOL scores at follow-up were significantly higher in the treatment group compared with the control group for the emotions domain (adjusted relative risk, 2.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.63; P = .01; interpreted as emotional QOL for treatment students increased by a factor of 2.08 above controls). Estimates for overall QOL and symptoms QOL were borderline significant (adjusted relative risk, 1.57; 95% confidence interval, 0.93-2.63; P = .09; and adjusted relative risk, 1.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-3.15; P = .08; respectively). Among teens not depressed at baseline, no significant differences were observed between treatment and control groups in QOL domains at follow-up. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that depression modified the relationship between the effectiveness of an asthma intervention and emotional QOL in urban teens. Further assessment of self-management behavioral interventions for asthma should explore the mechanism by which depression may alter the intervention effect. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00201058.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 10/2012; 109(4):237-242. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The literature suggests that depression is an important comorbidity in asthma that can significantly influence disease management and quality of life (QOL). To study the effect of coexisting depressive symptoms on the effectiveness of self-management interventions in urban teens with asthma. We analyzed data from a randomized controlled trial of Puff City, a web-based, tailored asthma management intervention for urban teens, to determine whether depression modulated intervention effectiveness for asthma control and QOL outcomes. Teens and caregivers were classified as depressed based on responses collected from baseline questionnaires. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that a lower percentage of treatment students had indicators of uncontrolled asthma compared with controls (adjusted odds ratios <1). However, for teens depressed at baseline, QOL scores at follow-up were significantly higher in the treatment group compared with the control group for the emotions domain (adjusted relative risk, 2.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.63; P = .01; interpreted as emotional QOL for treatment students increased by a factor of 2.08 above controls). Estimates for overall QOL and symptoms QOL were borderline significant (adjusted relative risk, 1.57; 95% confidence interval, 0.93-2.63; P = .09; and adjusted relative risk, 1.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-3.15; P = .08; respectively). Among teens not depressed at baseline, no significant differences were observed between treatment and control groups in QOL domains at follow-up. Our results suggest that depression modified the relationship between the effectiveness of an asthma intervention and emotional QOL in urban teens. Further assessment of self-management behavioral interventions for asthma should explore the mechanism by which depression may alter the intervention effect. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00201058.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 10/2012; 109(4):237-242.e2. · 3.45 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4k Citations
968.12 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Georgia Regents University
      Augusta, Georgia, United States
  • 1986–2014
    • Henry Ford Hospital
      • Department of Internal Medicine
      Detroit, Michigan, United States
  • 1999–2013
    • Georgia Health Sciences University
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Augusta, Georgia, United States
    • National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
      Maryland, United States
  • 2012
    • Children's Hospital of Michigan
      Detroit, Michigan, United States
  • 1991–2011
    • Henry Ford Health System
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      • • Division of Allergy and Immunology
      Detroit, Michigan, United States
  • 2009
    • University of Illinois at Chicago
      • Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics
      Chicago, IL, United States
  • 2003–2008
    • Medical College of Georgia
      Атина, Georgia, United States
  • 1997–2008
    • Wayne State University
      • Department of Internal Medicine
      Detroit, MI, United States
    • Albert Einstein College of Medicine
      • Department of Medicine
      New York City, NY, United States
  • 2006
    • Baylor College of Medicine
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 2004
    • Harvard Medical School
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1998–2002
    • Johns Hopkins University
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      Baltimore, MD, United States
  • 1990
    • Harper University Hospital
      Detroit, Michigan, United States