Ante Buca

University of Split-School of Medicine, Spalato, Splitsko-Dalmatinska, Croatia

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Publications (19)11.59 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to compare noncontrast computed tomography (NCCT) and computed tomography perfusion (CTP) in early diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke and to define influence of these diagnostic procedures on early outcome of thrombolytic therapy (TLTH). The study included 45 patients, 35 patients submitted to NCCT and CTP and 10 patients who underwent only NCCT, before CTP was introduced. Based on the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score we compared early outcome of patients who received TLTH after NCCT only (group 1) with the early outcome of patients who received TLTH following NCCT and CTP (group 2). Statistically significant difference was found in acute stroke diagnosing between CTP and NCCT (p = 0.002). There were no statistically significant differences in TLTH early outcome between group 1 and group 2. In conclusion, CTP should be done regulary in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke symptoms. More research needs to be done in defining exact influence of CTP implementation on the TLTH outcome.
    Collegium antropologicum 12/2010; 34(4):1391-6. · 0.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Radicular pain syndromes caused by disk herniation are often accompanied by incomplete central cord syndrome. Intensive pain is difficult to control with standard analgesics. Antiepileptics of new generation have shown significant efficacy in treating pain syndromes, trigeminal neuralgia, diabetic neuropathy, migraines, etc. The treatment of radicular pain with lamotrigine, a new generation antiepileptic, turned out to be effective in lumbar disk radicular conflicts, justifying its application for resistant pain in cervical segment. In our patient, pain intensity was significantly reduced with gradual titration of lamotrigine to a dose of 200 mg/day. Pain intensity measured by the visual analog scale significantly decreased from 100 to 20 mm during eight weeks of titration. The blood concentration of the drug measured by the method of high performance liquid chromatography was 13.65 micromol/L. The patient's quality of life improved greatly. It is necessary to further evaluate the efficacy of lamotrigine in the treatment of resistant radicular damage.
    Acta clinica Croatica 06/2009; 48(2):157-60. · 0.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neuropsychiatric disorders appear in about 70% of the patients diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aim of this study was to evaluate morphological and functional abnormalities of central nervous system (CNS) in SLE patients with neuropsychiatric manifestations (NP) of disease by testing their relationship. We tested 10 patients (9 females, 1 male) with clinical manifestations of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NP-SLE). That means clinical evaluation of symptoms, standard immunoserological tests, electroencephalogram (EEG), component of audio--evoked potentials P300, MMPI-202 test, Rey Complex Test and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI abnormalities were seen in all of our patients, while in 9 patients abnormalities in neuropsychological and neurophysiologic tests have been proved. The most common structural brain change, detected by MRI, was cortical atrophy (in 8 out of 10 patients). According to revised classification of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) NP-SLE, the most frequent disorder was cognitive dysfunction (in 9 out of 10 patients). Cortical atrophic brain changes have been established in 7 out of 9 patients with cognitive dysfunction. Because of already known correlation of cortical atrophy with cognitive dysfunction in SLE patients, without neuropsychiatric manifestation, we can conclude that neuropsychological examination is required in every patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.
    Collegium antropologicum 04/2009; 33(1):281-8. · 0.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acute brain diseases require timely and correct diagnosis. The basic guideline in treating these patients is clinical-neurological assessment. We tested the sensitivity and specificity of clinical assessment of acute brain disease according to definitive diagnosis determined by neuroradiology and computerized tomography (CT). We found a statistically significant correlation between the disease assessment and brain CT in patients with ischemic stroke. In patients with hemorrhagic stroke and brain tumors, the clinical-neurological assessment was found to be of statistically significantly lower sensitivity and specificity. Clinical assessment may produce false-positive and false-negative findings concerning hemorrhagic stroke and brain tumors. Study results indicated brain CT to be an unavoidable diagnostic method, along with clinical assessment of acute brain disorders.
    Acta medica Croatica: c̆asopis Hravatske akademije medicinskih znanosti 01/2009; 62(5):501-4.
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    ABSTRACT: We describe a case of spinal leptomeningeal metastases of an astrocytoma of the conus medullaris that presented with quadriplegia. The patient was a 50-year-old woman with a previously treated astrocytoma of the conus medullaris and a spinal cord metastasis at the Th2-L level. Four years after the initial treatment, the patient developed weakness of the upper extremities with a decreased muscular tonus. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed an intradural extramedullary metastatic tumor deposit at the C3-C6 level. Spinal leptomeningeal metastases need to be suspected in patients with a history of intramedullary astrocytoma.
    Acta neurologica Belgica 01/2009; 108(4):170-2. · 0.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Radicular pain syndromes caused by disk herniation are often accompanied by incomplete central cord syndrome. Intensive pain is difficult to control with standard analgesics. Antiepileptics of new generation have shown significant efficacy in treating pain syndromes, trigeminal neuralgia, diabetic neuropathy, migraines, etc. The treatment of radicular pain with lamotrigine, a new generation antiepileptic, turned out to be effective in lumbar disk radicular conflicts, justifying its application for resistant pain in cervical segment. In our patient, pain intensity was significantly reduced with gradual titration of lamotrigine to a dose of 200 mg/day. Pain intensity measured by the visual analog scale significantly decreased from 100 to 20 mm during eight weeks of titration. The blood concentration of the drug measured by the method of high performance liquid chromatography was 13.65 µmol/L. The patient.s quality of life improved greatly. It is necessary to further evaluate the efficacy of lamotrigine in the treatment of resistant radicular damage.
    Acta Clinica Croatica; Vol.48 No.2. 01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Cerebral veno-sinus thrombosis (CVT) during puerperium may have fatal consequences. A nonspecific clinical picture must be complete with computed tomography of the brain and digital substract angiography of the brain blood vessels, and, once the clinical diagnosis is confirmed, coagulation tests and genetic analysis of the coagulation factor are to be made as well. Genetic polymorphisms associated with thrombophilia such as factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, MTHFR C677T, ACE and PIA1/A2 may be the cause of the hypercoagulability that results in CVT.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 07/2008; 25(3):270-2. · 1.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report a rare case of a patient with late onset of Chiari I malformation with associated syringomyelia that was successfully treated with foramen magnum decompression. Our patient is presenting initially with vertigo and gradual weakening of the left-hand gross motor ability, gradual hypesthesia. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a Chiari I malformation with syringomyelia. Posterior fossa decompression, C1 laminectomy and duroplasty were performed. After surgery, the vertigo completely resolved (Fig. 2, Ref. 13). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.
    Bratislavske lekarske listy 02/2008; 109(4):168-70. · 0.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Carotid-cavernous fistula is uncommon consequence of craniocerebral trauma. Earlier recognition of the patients with carotid-cavernous fistula and shorter time of delay in treatment could save patients from complications and vision loss. A 27-year-old man presented with severe craniocerebral injury after an car accident. He required emergent craniotomy for an open depressed cranial fractures, haemostasis and epidural hematoma. Three months later, the patient began to exhibit progressive chemosis and proptosis of left eye. Computed tomography and cerebral angiography revealed findings consistent with a carotid-cavernous fistula. Angiography revealed a fistula between carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. The patient was treated by transarterial embolization resulting in immediate and permanent occlusion of the fistula and improved visual acuity after six months follow-up. Posttraumatic carotid-cavernous fistula may be treated successfully with the use of transarterial coil embolization.
    Acta medica Croatica: c̆asopis Hravatske akademije medicinskih znanosti 05/2007; 61(2):207-9.
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    ABSTRACT: A 73-year old man presented with the tinnitus in the left ear for 11 months. Computer tomography (CT) showed an enlarged dolichoectasia of the left vertebral artery. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain shows dolichoectasia of the left vertebral artery and the initial part of the basilar artery. Multi-slices computer tomographic (MSCT) angiography showed an enlarged vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia of the left vertebral artery, which compressed the vestibulocochlear nerve. This study supports a vascular compression of cranial vestibulocochlear nerve and the brainstem as a cause of tinnitus, and demonstrates a MSCT angiography value as an excellent, non-invasive technique to demonstrate the compression (Fig. 1, Ref. 20). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.
    Bratislavske lekarske listy 02/2007; 108(10-11):455-7. · 0.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Early diagnosis of spondylodiscitis is a condition of efficient conservative treatment. Somatosensory-evoked potentials with clinical examination results are used in assessing the diagnosis, as well as in monitoring the course of disease and healing. MRI clearly shows the inflammatory process, healing and scars. We report a 46-year-old woman suffering from non-specific interscapular pains. The evoked somatosensory potentials of the tibial nerveshow potential conductivity being slowed down through the thoracic spine, which is clearly evident from the prolonged latency and the decreased amplitude of the evoked response. The performed thoracic spine MRI shows spondylodiscitis at the Thl0-11 level. The subject is a nurse administering BCG therapy at a urology clinic, due to the fact of which this was deemed to have been a case of tuberculous spondylodiscitis. Due to the possibility of scattering the causative agent by needle, the biopsy was given up and antituberculous therapy was administered ex juvantibus. The disease was followed up by clinical examinations, somatosensory-evoked potentials and MRI up to fully successful and final recovery from spondylodiscitis. The above examinations are of great help in diagnosing the tuberculous spondylodiscitis and monitoring the recovery (Fig. 6, Ref. 16).
    Bratislavske lekarske listy 02/2007; 108(3):153-7. · 0.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neurocysticercosis (cysticercosis cerebri) is a rare neurological diagnosis in Croatia. It is classically divided into four types: intraparenchymal, basilar cisternal, ventricular and diffuse. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) established the diagnosis by demonstrating cysticercosis disseminated throughout the cerebral parenchyma. The authors emphasize the potential of the ELISA test to detect anticysticercosis antibodies in blood and cerebrospinal liquor (CSF). Diagnostics of neurocysticercosis is enabled jointly by clinical signs, neuroradiological, serum and liquor tests. We report the case of a 70-year old man with clinical and neuroradiological signs of cysticercosis cerebri. The neurological status is dominated by ataxia, corticospinal pathways damages and cognitive capacity impairments. CT of the brain shows calcificated and cystic lesions of various sizes. MRI of the brain enables the final diagnosis of the cysticercosis cerebri with multiple and multicentric lesions that indicate various stages of the cerebral cysticercosis (Fig. 2, Ref 20). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.
    Bratislavske lekarske listy 02/2007; 108(9):414-6. · 0.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Vascular compression of the facial nerve is a well recognized cause of hemifacial spasm (HFS). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) provide vascular and brain tissue diagnosis in a single non-invasive examination and should be recommended as primary neuroradiological procedure in HFS. We report a rare case of symptomatic HFS caused by a vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia. A 49-year-old women experienced left hemifacial spasm for 10 months. MRI showed an enlarged vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia of the left vertebral artery which compressed the seventh cranial nerve at its exit from the caude pons. MRI is essential in establishing the cause of HFS. Together with MR angiography it shows the correlation among the seventh cranial nerve, blood vessels and the structures of mid-brain. Vertebrobasilar delichoestasia is just one of the blood vessel anomalies which causes HFS and which can be shown by MRI. HFS caused by vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia is quite rare.
    Acta neurologica Belgica 04/2006; 106(1):23-5. · 0.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study we reviewed the initial clinical and radiological management and early outcomes of 176 consecutive patients from the war in Croatia.
    Acta Neurochirurgica 02/2000; 142(1):101-2. · 1.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome is an important albeit infrequent cause of serious disability among young adults and athletes with anomalous anatomic relationships between the popliteal artery and surrounding musculotendinous structures. We report our experience with 3 patients, in whom we used duplex ultrasonography, computed tomography, digital subtraction angiography, and conventional arteriography to diagnose popliteal artery entrapment and to grade the severity of dynamic circulatory insufficiency and arterial damage. We used a posterior surgical approach to give the best view of the anatomic structures compressing the popliteal artery. In 2 patients, in whom compression had not yet damaged the arterial wall, operative decompression of the artery by resection of the aberrant muscle was sufficient. In the 3rd patient, operative reconstruction of an occluded segment with autologous vein graft was necessary, in addition to decompression of the vessel and resection of aberrant muscle. The result in each case was complete recovery, with absence of symptoms and with patency verified by Doppler examination. We conclude that clinicians who encounter young patients with progressive lowerlimb arterial insufficiency should be aware of the possibility of popliteal artery entrapment. Early diagnosis through a combined approach (careful physical examination and history-taking, duplex ultrasonography, computerized tomography, and angiography) is necessary for exact diagnosis. The treatment of choice is the surgical creation of normal anatomy within the popliteal fossa.
    Texas Heart Institute journal / from the Texas Heart Institute of St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital, Texas Children's Hospital 02/2000; 27(1):3-13. · 0.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to provide information on the diagnosis and treatment of kinking -- bends in the extracranial internal carotid artery (KICA), a rate but major and treatable cause of cerebral ischemia. A retrospective review of the seven-year experience in Split Hospital. ESSENTIAL DATA: The role of the surgical correction of carotid artery kinking has not yet been precisely defined. Of the 86 carotid revascularization operations performed in 76 patients from 1988 to 1994, 21 (29%) patients underwent surgery owing to symptomatic kinking of the internal carotid artery. This group included 8 females and 13 males with a mean age of 57.3+/-5.5 years (range 44-70). Symptoms included cerebrovascular insults in 43%, hemispheric transient ischemic attacks in 33%, reversible ischemic neurological deficit in 24% of patients. The diagnosis was made using two-dimensional ultrasound scan and Doppler, computerised tomography and angiographic evaluation. Two methods were used: the elimination of kinking and graft of the internal artery onto the common carotid artery with excision of the kinked section of the artery and end-to-end anastomosis. Dense fibrous tissues around the kinked artery were removed and the artery was freed along its entire course. The anomalous relationship between the internal carotid artery, occipital artery and hypoglossal nerve was corrected. After surgery seventeen patients fully recovered without neurological complications. One patient died, one patient suffered permanent neurological deficit, two suffered from transient ischemic attacks. Anatomic reconstruction together with the correction and elimination of the affected segments of the carotid artery may prevent progressive cerebrovascular symptoms and is associated with a low morbidity and mortality rate.
    The Journal of cardiovascular surgery 11/1998; 39(5):557-63. · 1.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we review the initial clinical and radiological management and early outcomes of 14 patients with orbitocranial war injuries treated at the University Hospital Split between 1991 and 1995. This investigation involves 14 patients (13 soldiers and 1 civilian) with orbitocranial war injuries. The mean patient age was 31 years (range, 23-54 years). The penetrating object was a metal shrapnel fragment in 8 patients and a bullet in 6 patients. The results of clinical and radiological management were retrospectively analyzed. The mean time from the moment of wounding to hospital admission was 6 hours (range, 1-30 hours). The mean Glasgow Coma Scale score was 8 (range, 3-14). Craniotomy was the basic neurosurgical procedure, and three patients were treated with simple scalp wound debridement and closure. Osteoplastic operations of the orbital bones were performed in 13 patients. Enucleation/evisceration was performed in 6 patients (42.8%). At discharge, the mean Glasgow Outcome Scale score was 13, and 1 patient died in the hospital. Blindness (including amaurosis and anophthalmus) was present in nine eyes (8 patients), light-perception positivity and projection positivity were present in four eyes, and visual acuity was at 0.1 in 1 patient. An early multidisciplinary therapeutic approach and computed tomography as a diagnostic procedure are necessary for a good result in the treatment of orbitocranial war injuries.
    Military medicine 08/1998; 163(7):490-3. · 0.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study is to present our experience in treating 191 patients with eye and orbit injuries that occurred during the war in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiological management of wartime eye and orbit injuries in patients hospitalized at Clinical Hospital Split. Seventy-nine percent of the war eye and orbit injuries were caused by fragments of explosive devices, 9.9% by high-velocity missiles, and 8.4% by other objects. Most of the patients were admitted to the hospital within 24 hours of injury. The total number of injured globes was 222; 48.2% of globes had intrabulbar (mostly magnetic) foreign bodies, and 13% had extrabulbar intraorbital foreign bodies. Extensive wounds (perforation, double perforation, rupture, and evisceration/ enucleation) were encountered in 74% of patients, and 26% of patients had slight trauma. There was a statistically significant correlation between admission within the first 12 hours and postoperative visual acuity (Chi 2 = 3.93; p = 0.0474). Along with clinical examination, computed tomography is the most important diagnostic procedure in preoperative evaluation of various forms of globe and orbit injuries. The admission time is the most important factor in determining postoperative visual acuity.
    Military medicine 07/1998; 163(6):423-6. · 0.77 Impact Factor
  • Acta Clinica Croatica; Vol.41 No.3 Supplement 3.