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Publications (6)4.34 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We describe a case of spinal leptomeningeal metastases of an astrocytoma of the conus medullaris that presented with quadriplegia. The patient was a 50-year-old woman with a previously treated astrocytoma of the conus medullaris and a spinal cord metastasis at the Th2-L level. Four years after the initial treatment, the patient developed weakness of the upper extremities with a decreased muscular tonus. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed an intradural extramedullary metastatic tumor deposit at the C3-C6 level. Spinal leptomeningeal metastases need to be suspected in patients with a history of intramedullary astrocytoma.
    Acta neurologica Belgica 01/2009; 108(4):170-2. · 0.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cerebral veno-sinus thrombosis (CVT) during puerperium may have fatal consequences. A nonspecific clinical picture must be complete with computed tomography of the brain and digital substract angiography of the brain blood vessels, and, once the clinical diagnosis is confirmed, coagulation tests and genetic analysis of the coagulation factor are to be made as well. Genetic polymorphisms associated with thrombophilia such as factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, MTHFR C677T, ACE and PIA1/A2 may be the cause of the hypercoagulability that results in CVT.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis 07/2008; 25(3):270-2. · 1.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report a rare case of a patient with late onset of Chiari I malformation with associated syringomyelia that was successfully treated with foramen magnum decompression. Our patient is presenting initially with vertigo and gradual weakening of the left-hand gross motor ability, gradual hypesthesia. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a Chiari I malformation with syringomyelia. Posterior fossa decompression, C1 laminectomy and duroplasty were performed. After surgery, the vertigo completely resolved (Fig. 2, Ref. 13). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.
    Bratislavske lekarske listy 02/2008; 109(4):168-70. · 0.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neurocysticercosis (cysticercosis cerebri) is a rare neurological diagnosis in Croatia. It is classically divided into four types: intraparenchymal, basilar cisternal, ventricular and diffuse. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) established the diagnosis by demonstrating cysticercosis disseminated throughout the cerebral parenchyma. The authors emphasize the potential of the ELISA test to detect anticysticercosis antibodies in blood and cerebrospinal liquor (CSF). Diagnostics of neurocysticercosis is enabled jointly by clinical signs, neuroradiological, serum and liquor tests. We report the case of a 70-year old man with clinical and neuroradiological signs of cysticercosis cerebri. The neurological status is dominated by ataxia, corticospinal pathways damages and cognitive capacity impairments. CT of the brain shows calcificated and cystic lesions of various sizes. MRI of the brain enables the final diagnosis of the cysticercosis cerebri with multiple and multicentric lesions that indicate various stages of the cerebral cysticercosis (Fig. 2, Ref 20). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.
    Bratislavske lekarske listy 02/2007; 108(9):414-6. · 0.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A 73-year old man presented with the tinnitus in the left ear for 11 months. Computer tomography (CT) showed an enlarged dolichoectasia of the left vertebral artery. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain shows dolichoectasia of the left vertebral artery and the initial part of the basilar artery. Multi-slices computer tomographic (MSCT) angiography showed an enlarged vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia of the left vertebral artery, which compressed the vestibulocochlear nerve. This study supports a vascular compression of cranial vestibulocochlear nerve and the brainstem as a cause of tinnitus, and demonstrates a MSCT angiography value as an excellent, non-invasive technique to demonstrate the compression (Fig. 1, Ref. 20). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.
    Bratislavske lekarske listy 02/2007; 108(10-11):455-7. · 0.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Early diagnosis of spondylodiscitis is a condition of efficient conservative treatment. Somatosensory-evoked potentials with clinical examination results are used in assessing the diagnosis, as well as in monitoring the course of disease and healing. MRI clearly shows the inflammatory process, healing and scars. We report a 46-year-old woman suffering from non-specific interscapular pains. The evoked somatosensory potentials of the tibial nerveshow potential conductivity being slowed down through the thoracic spine, which is clearly evident from the prolonged latency and the decreased amplitude of the evoked response. The performed thoracic spine MRI shows spondylodiscitis at the Thl0-11 level. The subject is a nurse administering BCG therapy at a urology clinic, due to the fact of which this was deemed to have been a case of tuberculous spondylodiscitis. Due to the possibility of scattering the causative agent by needle, the biopsy was given up and antituberculous therapy was administered ex juvantibus. The disease was followed up by clinical examinations, somatosensory-evoked potentials and MRI up to fully successful and final recovery from spondylodiscitis. The above examinations are of great help in diagnosing the tuberculous spondylodiscitis and monitoring the recovery (Fig. 6, Ref. 16).
    Bratislavske lekarske listy 02/2007; 108(3):153-7. · 0.47 Impact Factor