Gregory F Wu

Washington University in St. Louis, San Luis, Missouri, United States

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Publications (18)109.73 Total impact

  • Journal of Neuroimmunology. 10/2014; 275(s 1–2):15–16.
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    ABSTRACT: Expression profiling of distinct central nervous system (CNS) cell populations has been employed to facilitate disease classification and to provide insights into the molecular basis of brain pathology. One important cell type implicated in a wide variety of CNS disease states is the resident brain macrophage (microglia). In these studies, microglia are often isolated from dissociated brain tissue by flow sorting procedures [fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)] or from postnatal glial cultures by mechanic isolation. Given the highly dynamic and state-dependent functions of these cells, the use of FACS or short-term culture methods may not accurately capture the biology of brain microglia. In the current study, we performed RNA-sequencing using Cx3cr1+/GFP labeled microglia isolated from the brainstem of 6-week-old mice to compare the transcriptomes of FACS-sorted versus laser capture microdissection (LCM). While both isolation techniques resulted in a large number of shared (common) transcripts, we identified transcripts unique to FACS-isolated and LCM-captured microglia. In particular, ∼50% of these LCM-isolated microglial transcripts represented genes typically associated with neurons and glia. While these transcripts clearly localized to microglia using complementary methods, they were not translated into protein. Following the induction of murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, increased oligodendrocyte and neuronal transcripts were detected in microglia, while only the myelin basic protein oligodendrocyte transcript was increased in microglia after traumatic brain injury. Collectively, these findings have implications for the design and interpretation of microglia transcriptome-based investigations. GLIA 2014
    Glia 09/2014; · 5.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: High-affinity class-switched Abs and memory B cells are products of the germinal center (GC). The CD4(+) T cell help required for the development and maintenance of the GC is delivered by follicular Th cells (TFH), a CD4(+) Th cell subset characterized by expression of Bcl-6 and secretion of IL-21. The cellular interactions that mediate differentiation of TFH and GC B cells remain an important area of investigation. We previously showed that MHC class II (MHCII)-dependent dendritic cell Ag presentation is sufficient for the differentiation of a TFH intermediate (termed pre-TFH), characterized by Bcl-6 expression but lacking IL-21 secretion. In this article, we examine the contributions of MHCII Ag presentation by B cells to TFH differentiation and GC responses in several contexts. B cells alone do not efficiently prime naive CD4(+) T cells or induce TFH after protein immunization; however, during lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection, B cells induce TFH differentiation despite the lack of effector CD4(+) T cell generation. Still, MHCII(+) dendritic cells and B cells cooperate for optimal TFH and GC B cell differentiation in response to both model Ags and viral infection. This study highlights the roles for B cells in both CD4(+) T cell priming and TFH differentiation, and demonstrates that different APC subsets work in tandem to mediate the GC response.
    The Journal of Immunology 03/2014; · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) functions as a ligand in receptor-mediated endocytosis of lipoprotein particles and has been demonstrated to play a role in antigen presentation. To explore the contribution of ApoE during autoimmune central nervous system (CNS) demyelination, we examined the clinical, cellular immune function, and pathologic consequences of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induction in ApoE knockout (ApoE-/-) mice. We observed reduced clinical severity of EAE in ApoE-/- mice in comparison to WT mice that was concomitant with an early reduction of dendritic cells (DCs) followed by a reduction of additional innate cells in the spinal cord at the peak of disease without any differences in axonal damage. While T cell priming was enhanced in ApoE-/- mice, reduced severity of EAE was also observed in ApoE-/- recipients of encephalitogenic wild type T cells. Expression of ApoE during EAE was elevated within the CNS of wild type mice, particularly by innate cells such as DCs. Overall, ApoE promotes clinical EAE, likely by mediation of inflammation localized within the CNS.
    Journal of neuroimmunology 01/2014; · 2.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Strategies to expand regulatory T cells hold therapeutic potential for ameliorating T cell-mediated autoimmunity. Recently, we reported that the requirements for T cell receptor signaling in conventional T cell and regulatory T cell proliferation are different. Using mutant mice that display defective T cell receptor-mediated phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) activation, we hereby demonstrate that PLCγ activation is required for antigen-specific conventional T cell proliferation but not for IL-2-induced regulatory T cell proliferation. This led us to hypothesize that in conjunction with IL-2, pharmacological inhibition of T cell receptor-mediated PLCγ activation might offer a novel therapeutic strategy to expand regulatory T cells while simultaneously inhibiting conventional T cell proliferation. Indeed, using the calcineurin inhibitor Cyclosporine A to inhibit signaling downstream of PLCγ, we found that Cyclosporine A attenuated antigen-specific Tconv proliferation but permitted IL-2-induced regulatory T cell expansion in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the combination of Cyclosporine A and IL-2 was superior over either Cyclosporine A or IL-2 monotherapy in protection against the T cell-mediated demyelinating autoimmune disease mouse model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Thus, a combination of TCR signaling inhibition and IL-2 might be a beneficial strategy in expanding regulatory T cells and inhibiting conventional T cell proliferation in autoimmune settings.
    Journal of Autoimmunity 07/2013; · 8.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The activation, differentiation, and subsequent effector functions of CD4 T cells depend on interactions with a multitude of MHC class II (MHCII)-expressing APCs. To evaluate the individual contribution of various APCs to CD4 T cell function, we have designed a new murine tool for selective in vivo expression of MHCII in subsets of APCs. Conditional expression of MHCII in B cells was achieved using a cre-loxP approach. After i.v. or s.c. priming, partial proliferation and activation of CD4 T cells was observed in mice expressing MHCII only by B cells. Restricting MHCII expression to B cells constrained secondary CD4 T cell responses in vivo, as demonstrated in a CD4 T cell-dependent model of autoimmunity, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These results highlight the limitations of B cell Ag presentation during initiation and propagation of CD4 T cell function in vivo using a novel system to study individual APCs by the conditional expression of MHCII.
    The Journal of Immunology 06/2013; · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: microRNAs (miRNAs) are dysregulated in a variety of disease states, suggesting that this newly discovered class of gene expression repressors may be viable therapeutic targets. A microarray of miRNA changes in ALS model SOD1(G93A) rodents identified 12 miRNAs as significantly changed. Six miRNAs tested in human ALS tissues were confirmed increased. Specifically, miR-155 was increased 5-fold in mice and 2-fold in human spinal cords. To test miRNA inhibition in the central nervous system as a potential novel therapeutic, we developed oligonucleotide-based miRNA inhibitors (anti-miRs) that could inhibit miRNAs throughout the central nervous system and in the periphery. Anti-miR-155 caused global derepression of targets in peritoneal macrophages and, following intraventricular delivery, demonstrated widespread functional distribution in the brain and spinal cord. After treating SOD1(G93A) mice with anti-miR-155, we significantly extended survival by 10 days and disease duration by 15 days (38%) while a scrambled control anti-miR did not significantly improve survival or disease duration. Therefore, antisense oligonucleotides may be used to successfully inhibit miRNAs throughout the brain and spinal cord, and miR-155 is a promising new therapeutic target for human ALS.
    Human Molecular Genetics 06/2013; · 7.69 Impact Factor
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    Gregory F Wu, Enrique Alvarez
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    ABSTRACT: This review explores the principle features of the immunopathology of multiple sclerosis (MS), particularly relapsing-remitting MS. It highlights the emerging concepts in the pathogenesis of MS in the context of known features of pathology, including the characterization of cytokine networks promoting inflammatory damage of the central nervous system, B-cell involvement, and inflammatory damage of axons and neurons. This article preferentially focuses on MS rather than animal models of the disease, such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.
    Neurologic Clinics 05/2011; 29(2):257-78. · 1.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The adaptor protein Src homology 2 domain-containing leukocyte-specific protein of 76 kDa (SLP-76) is central to the organization of intracellular signaling downstream of the T-cell receptor (TCR). Evaluation of its role in mature, primary T cells has been hampered by developmental defects that occur in the absence of WT SLP-76 protein in thymocytes. Here, we show that following tamoxifen-regulated conditional deletion of SLP-76, mature, antigen-inexperienced T cells maintain normal TCR surface expression but fail to transduce TCR-generated signals. Conditionally deficient T cells fail to proliferate in response to antigenic stimulation or a lymphopenic environment. Mice with induced deletion of SLP-76 are resistant to induction of the CD4+ T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Altogether, our findings demonstrate the critical role of SLP-76-mediated signaling in initiating T-cell-directed immune responses both in vitro and in vivo and highlight the ability to analyze signaling processes in mature T cells in the absence of developmental defects.
    European Journal of Immunology 04/2011; 41(7):2064-73. · 4.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model for the human disease multiple sclerosis (MS), is dependent upon the activation and effector functions of autoreactive CD4 T cells. Multiple interactions between CD4 T cells and major histocompatibility class II (MHCII)+ antigen presenting cells (APCs) must occur in both the periphery and central nervous system (CNS) to elicit autoimmunity. The identity of the MHCII+ APCs involved throughout this process remains in question. We investigated which APC in the periphery and CNS mediates disease using transgenic mice with MHCII expression restricted to dendritic cells (DCs). MHCII expression restricted to DCs results in normal susceptibility to peptide-mediated EAE. Indeed, radiation-sensitive bone marrow-derived DCs were sufficient for all APC functions during peptide-induced disease. However, DCs alone were inefficient at promoting disease after immunization with the myelin protein myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), even in the presence of MHCII-deficient B cells. Consistent with a defect in disease induction following protein immunization, antigen presentation by DCs alone was incapable of mediating spontaneous optic neuritis. These results indicate that DCs are capable of perpetuating CNS-targeted autoimmunity when antigens are readily available, but other APCs are required to efficiently initiate pathogenic cognate CD4 T cell responses.
    Journal of Autoimmunity 02/2011; 36(1):56-64. · 8.15 Impact Factor
  • Anne H Cross, Gregory F Wu
    Nature Reviews Neurology 11/2010; 6(11):588-9. · 15.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins are highly homologous proteins that function to link cargo molecules to the actin cytoskeleton. Ezrin and moesin are both expressed in mature lymphocytes, where they play overlapping roles in cell signaling and polarity, but their role in lymphoid development has not been explored. We characterized ERM protein expression in lymphoid tissues and analyzed the requirement for ezrin expression in lymphoid development. In wildtype mice, we found that most cells in the spleen and thymus express both ezrin and moesin, but little radixin. ERM protein expression in the thymus was differentially regulated, such that ezrin expression was highest in immature thymocytes and diminished during T cell development. In contrast, moesin expression was low in early thymocytes and upregulated during T cell development. Mice bearing a germline deletion of ezrin exhibited profound defects in the size and cellularity of the spleen and thymus, abnormal thymic architecture, diminished hematopoiesis, and increased proportions of granulocytic precursors. Further analysis using fetal liver chimeras and thymic transplants showed that ezrin expression is dispensable in hematopoietic and stromal lineages, and that most of the defects in lymphoid development in ezrin(-/-) mice likely arise as a consequence of nutritional stress. We conclude that despite high expression in lymphoid precursor cells, ezrin is dispensable for lymphoid development, most likely due to redundancy with moesin.
    PLoS ONE 01/2010; 5(8):e12404. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    Terri M Laufer, Gregory F Wu
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    ABSTRACT: Current therapies for immune-mediated diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and MS, could represent the proverbial bird in the hand - a known entity, yet limited in potential. Emerging biologic therapeutics for these diseases carry with them the potential for known as well as unknown adverse effects. Alemtuzumab, a biologic that depletes leukocytes, shows great promise for the treatment of MS. However, a significant number of patients develop autoimmunity after treatment, raising the level of caution for the use of this drug. In this issue of the JCI, Jones et al. describe a link between IL-21 levels and alemtuzumab-associated autoimmunity (see the related article beginning on page 2052). They show that proliferation of lymphocytes in those patients with autoimmunity is higher than in those without autoimmunity and suggest that the lymphopenia-driven proliferation of T cells, in combination with higher IL-21 levels, results in autoimmunity. This study helps inspire new enthusiasm for making a grab for the proverbial two birds in the bush - representing undiscovered therapies - with greater confidence.
    The Journal of clinical investigation 08/2009; 119(7):1852-3. · 15.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To understand lymphocyte behavior in the brain, we used two-photon microscopy to visualize effector CD8(+) T cells during toxoplasmic encephalitis. These cells displayed multiple behaviors with two distinct populations of cells apparent: one with a constrained pattern of migration and one with a highly migratory subset. The proportion of these populations varied over time associated with changes in antigen availability as well as T cell expression of the inhibitory receptor PD1. Unexpectedly, the movement of infiltrating cells was closely associated with an infection-induced reticular system of fibers. This observation suggests that, whereas in other tissues pre-existing scaffolds exist that guide lymphocyte migration, in the brain specialized structures are induced by inflammation that guide migration of T cells in this immune-privileged environment.
    Immunity 02/2009; 30(2):300-11. · 19.80 Impact Factor
  • Gregory F Wu, Terri M Laufer
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    ABSTRACT: Although multiple sclerosis (MS) is a presumed T-cell- mediated disease, it is unclear what triggers the development of neuroantigen-specific T cells. Autoreactive CD4(+) T cells are activated by antigen presenting cells; dendritic cells (DCs) are the primary antigen presenting cells directing T-cell functions and are, therefore, extremely important in directing the immune pathology characteristic of MS. Three important concepts have emerged regarding DCs in MS. First, DCs are present within the healthy central nervous system (CNS) in association with the cerebrospinal fluid space and microvasculature. Therefore, the potential for sampling of CNS antigens in similar fashion to other tissues and organs exists and likely plays an integral role in CNS immunity. The degree of involvement, as well as the source, of these CNS DCs has been addressed by several studies using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis animal model. Second, DCs are found within MS lesions and have been shown to be functionally abnormal in patients with MS. Lastly, therapeutics directed at DCs could potentially be engineered for treatment in MS and in fact may already be involved in the mechanisms of current immunomodulatory therapies.
    Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports 06/2007; 7(3):245-52. · 3.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The cause of transient global amnesia (TGA) remains controversial. Focal cerebral ischemia, seizure, venous congestion, and migraine have all been proposed as underlying mechanisms. We describe a patient presenting with typical TGA who two days later developed a posterior circulation stroke due to basilar artery occlusion. He was treated successfully with intra-arterial thrombolytic therapy. Shortly thereafter, he had recurrent basilar artery thrombosis and jugular vein thrombosis, and was found to have a mucinous adenocarcinoma believed to be causing a hypercoagulable state. We believe this case supports the hypothesis that TGA can on occasion be caused by cerebral ischemia.
    Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery 01/2006; 108(1):60-2. · 1.23 Impact Factor
  • Gregory F Wu, Laura J Balcer
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    ABSTRACT: Endocrine and metabolic disorders that cause neuro-ophthalmologic manifestations are frequently encountered by ophthalmologists in clinical practice. This review focuses on three of the most common entities for which neuro-ophthalmologic signs and symptoms are a prominent feature. These entities include pituitary disorders (adenoma, apoplexy, and hypophysitis), thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy, and neuro-ophthalmologic complications of diabetes mellitus, such as ischemic ocular motor mononeuropathies and diabetic papillopathy.
    Ophthalmology Clinics of North America 10/2004; 17(3):427-34, vii.
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    ABSTRACT: Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome is a disorder of the central nervous system in patients on dialysis. The underlying etiology is thought to be primarily due to cerebral edema; however, neuroradiologic findings have not been described previously. We describe a patient who presented with new onset headaches and status epilepticus after beginning hemodialysis. Her neuroimaging studies revealed white matter changes in the posterior parietal and occipital lobes similar to those seen in patients with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS). This case suggests that dialysis disequilibrium syndrome and RPLS may represent a spectrum of disorders in which the underlying mechanism is vasogenic edema.
    Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery 10/2003; 105(4):249-52. · 1.23 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

161 Citations
109.73 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011–2014
    • Washington University in St. Louis
      • Department of Neurology
      San Luis, Missouri, United States
  • 2004–2011
    • Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania
      • Department of Neurology
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2010
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • Department of Neurology
      Seattle, WA, United States