Catherine Paoletti

Institut de Cancérologie Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, Ile-de-France, France

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Publications (9)21.78 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine therapy-related risk factors for the development of melanoma after hemangioma. A cohort study was conducted among 4620 patients treated before 16 years of age for skin hemangioma in France. A nested case-control study was also conducted on 13 patients who developed a melanoma (cases) matched with five controls in cohort according to sex, age at the hemangioma diagnostic, the calendar year of occurrence of the hemangioma, and follow-up. The radiation dose received at the site of the melanoma and at the same site in controls was estimated, and named 'local dose'. A total of 13 melanomas were registered during an average follow-up of overall 35 years, the risk of developing melanoma after a hemangioma treatment was 2.5-fold higher [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.4-4.1] compared with that of the general population, this ratio being only 0.8 (95% CI: 0.05-3.6) in 896 patients who did not receive radiotherapy, but 3.0 (95% CI: 1.6-5.1) after radiotherapy. When adjusting on sex, age, and year of the treatment and follow-up duration, melanoma risk was 11.9 (95% CI: 1.4-123) times higher in patients treated with ytrium 90 than in the ones who did not received radiotherapy. In the case-control study, the risk of melanoma was not linked to the local radiation dose. Indeed, the increase in melanoma risk was observed even for very low local doses. Compared with the corresponding skin areas in patients who did not receive radiotherapy, the ones having received less than 0.001 Gy had a melanoma risk of 3.9 (95% CI: 0.5-32) and those who received more than 0.01 Gy had a risk of 6.9 (0.5-99). This study suggests that radiation therapy of skin hemangioma increases the risk of further melanoma, but we were not able to evidence a relation with the local dose. Nevertheless, childhood treated for hemangioma should be considered at risk for developing melanoma and suspicious pigmented lesions should be carefully evaluated even far from treated areas.
    Melanoma research 11/2011; 22(1):77-85. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A cohort study was performed to investigate the carcinogenic effect of treatment of skin hemangioma with ionizing radiation in early childhood. This paper presents the incidence of breast cancer (BC) in this cohort and its association with radiotherapy. In an incidence study, 3,316 women treated for a skin hemangioma between 1941 and 1977 at the Institut Gustave-Roussy were included, among whom 2,697 had received radiotherapy. The mean age at first exposure was 0.7 years, and the mean absorbed dose to the breast was 70 mGy. Treatment reconstruction and the estimation of radiation doses delivered to the breast were obtained for 92% of the women who had received radiotherapy. External and internal analyses were performed. During an average follow-up of 35 years, a total of 17 women developed an invasive BC, compared to 7.5 expected in the French general population (SIR = 2.3, 95% CI, 1.4-3.5), and the absolute excess risk strongly increased with attained age. Compared to individuals with no radiotherapy, the risk of BC increased with increasing radiation dose with RRs of 3.2, 6.3, and 8.0 for dose categories of >0-10, 10-100, and >100 mGy, respectively; however, dose-response relationship was not significant. This study confirms that radiation treatment performed in the past for hemangioma during childhood increases the risk of BC.
    Cancer Causes and Control 11/2010; 21(11):1807-16. · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nuclear workers from French contracting companies have received higher doses than workers from Electricité de France (EDF) or Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA). A cohort study of 9,815 workers in 11 contracting companies, monitored for exposure to ionizing radiation between 1967 and 2000 were followed up for a median duration of 12.5 years. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed. Between 1968 and 2002, 250 deaths occurred. Our study demonstrated a clear healthy worker effect (HWE) with mortality attaining half that expected from national mortality statistics (SMR = 0.54, 95% CI = [0.47-0.61]). The HWE was lower for all cancers (SMR = 0.65) than for non-cancer deaths (SMR = 0.46). The analysis by cancer site showed no excess compared with the general population. Significant trends were observed according to the level of exposure to ionizing radiation for deaths from cancer, deaths from digestive cancer and deaths from respiratory cancer. The mortality of nuclear workers from contracting companies is very low compared to French national mortality.
    American Journal of Industrial Medicine 11/2009; 52(12):916-25. · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A cohort study was performed to investigate the carcinogenic effect of treating skin hemangioma with ionizing radiation during early childhood. This paper presents the incidence of differentiated thyroid adenomas and carcinomas after radiotherapy in this cohort. Of a total of 8307 patients treated for a skin hemangioma between 1940 and 1973 at the Institut Gustave-Roussy, 4767 were included in an incidence study, among whom 3795 had received radiotherapy. Seventy-three percent were less than 1-year-old at the time of treatment. External radiotherapy, Radium 226, Strontium 90, Yttrium 90, and Phosphorus 32 were used. The radiation dose received by the thyroid during radiotherapy, estimated in 3497 of the 3795 patients using specific software, was 41 mGy on average. Thyroid tumor cases were obtained by sending out a questionnaire, and were verified in pathological reports. Estimates of thyroid cancer specific incidence rates in the French population were obtained from the French cancer registry network. External and internal analyses were performed. During an average follow-up of 35 years, 11 patients developed a differentiated thyroid carcinoma and 44 a thyroid adenoma. The incidence of thyroid adenoma was found to be higher among taller and heavier individuals. The incidence of both thyroid carcinoma and adenoma was higher among non-smoker patients. A significant dose-response relationship was found between the radiation dose received by thyroid and the risk of thyroid cancer (Excess Relative Risk per GY, ERR/Gy: 14.7, 95%CI: 1.6-62.9) and of adenoma (ERR/Gy: 5.7, 95%CI: 0.7-19.4). This study confirms that radiation treatment performed in the past for hemangioma during infancy increased the risk of thyroid carcinoma and adenoma. Patients treated with external radiotherapy or with Radium 226 applicators for hemangiomas have to be more specifically followed up because this is the subgroup in whom the highest doses were received by the thyroid gland (more than 90% of the radiation doses were higher than 100 mGy). They are therefore more at risk of developing thyroid cancer.
    Radiotherapy and Oncology 07/2009; 93(2):377-82. · 4.52 Impact Factor
  • Radioprotection 01/2008; 43(5). · 0.44 Impact Factor
  • Epidemiology. 01/2006; 17.
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    ABSTRACT: Melanoma is a severe skin cancer related to sun exposure. Whether this malignancy is linked to exposure to ionising radiation during adulthood is still controversial. This case-control study examined the risk of melanoma following treatment for an adulthood first malignant neoplasm (FMN). Cases were patients who presented with cutaneous melanoma after a first cancer in adulthood. Controls (3 per case) were patients free of melanoma, matched for age, duration of follow-up since the FMN, type of FMN, and followed in the same institution. A total of 57 cases and 171 controls were included. In the final multivariate analysis, no risk of melanoma was associated with radiotherapy (odds ratio (OR) for 1 Gy = 1.01, 95% confidence interval (95%CI) 0.96-1.07) nor hormonotherapy, whereas chemotherapy use (OR = 2.3, 95%CI 0.93-5.6) and having a history of familial cancer (OR = 2.8, 95%CI 1.3-5.9) exhibited a nearly significant risk. In conclusion, unlike the evidence for risk of exposure to ionising radiation during childhood, we did not substantiate a risk for association of melanoma with exposure to ionising radiation during adulthood. The risk associated with chemotherapy should justify the implementation of skin surveillance for early detection of melanoma in these patients.
    European Journal of Cancer 01/2006; 41(18):2904-10. · 5.06 Impact Factor
  • Revue D Epidemiologie Et De Sante Publique - REV EPIDEMIOL SANTE PUBL. 01/2006; 54:60-60.
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    ABSTRACT: A cohort study was performed as part of a European Radiation Protection Program to investigate the carcinogenic effect of treatment with ionizing radiation in early childhood. This paper presents mortality after radiotherapy in this cohort. The cohort comprised 7037 patients under 15 years of age treated for a skin hemangioma between 1940 and 1973 at the Institut Gustave-Roussy, among whom 4940 received radiotherapy. The vital status and causes of death were obtained as well as the mortality rates in the general French population. External and internal analyses were performed. Standardized mortality ratio (SMR) and relative risk (RR) variations according to exposure to radiotherapy or not and the type of treatment were studied. During the 1969-1997 follow-up period, 16 cohort patients died of cancer, 14 after radiotherapy. A non-significant excess of cancer-related mortality was observed for irradiated patients as compared to the general population (SMR=1.53; 95% CI=0.86-2.48). Treatment with (226)Ra seemed to play a significant role (RR=2.53; 95% CI=0.84-7.07) compared to no radiotherapy. This study suggests an excess risk of cancer-related mortality in patients treated during early childhood with radiotherapy for skin hemangioma, and especially with (226)Ra. These patients need to be followed up in the future.
    Radiotherapy and Oncology 08/2004; 72(1):87-93. · 4.52 Impact Factor