Ana H C Guimarães

Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam, Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands

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Publications (14)83.22 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Rijken DC, Kock EL, Guimarães AHC, Talens S, Murad S Darwish, Janssen HLA, Leebeek FWG. Evidence for an enhanced fibrinolytic capacity in cirrhosis as measured with two different global fibrinolysis tests. J Thromb Haemost 2012; 10: 2116-22. Summary.  Background and objectives:  It has been known for a long time that cirrhosis is associated with hyperfibrinolysis, which might contribute to an increased risk and severity of bleeding. However, recent papers have questioned the presence of a hyperfibrinolytic state in cirrhotic patients and postulated a rebalanced system owing to concomitant changes in both pro- and anti-fibrinolytic factors. Therefore we re-investigated the fibrinolytic state of cirrhotic patients using two different overall tests including a recently developed test for global fibrinolytic capacity (GFC) using whole blood. Patients and methods:  Blood was collected from 30 healthy controls and 75 patients with cirrhosis of varying severity (34 Child-Pugh A, 28 Child-Pugh B and 13 Child-Pugh C). The plasma clot lysis time (CLT), which is inversely correlated with fibrinolysis, was determined as well as the GFC. Results:  The mean CLT was 74.5 min in the controls and decreased significantly to 66.9 min in Child-Pugh class A patients, 59.3 min in class B patients and 61.0 min in class C patients, and hyperfibrinolysis existed in 40% of the patients. The median GFC was 1.7 μg mL(-1) in the controls and increased significantly to 4.0 μg mL(-1) in Child-Pugh class A patients, 11.1 μg mL(-1) in class B patients and 22.5 μg mL(-1) in class C patients, and hyperfibrinolysis existed in 43% of the patients. Taken together, 60% of the patients showed hyperfibrinolysis in at least one of the two global assays. Conclusion:  A rebalanced fibrinolytic system may occur, but hyperfibrinolysis is found in the majority of patients with cirrhosis.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 08/2012; 10(10):2116-22. · 6.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies suggested that hypofibrinolysis is associated with increased risk of peripheral arterial disease. Thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) has been identified as an important inhibitor of fibrinolysis. The aim of our study was to assess the role of TAFI in young patients with peripheral arterial disease. In a single-center case-control study we measured plasma TAFI antigen levels and functional TAFI in consecutive young patients (men 18-45 years and women 18-55 years) with a first manifestation of peripheral arterial disease and compared these with a population-based control group. A total of 47 peripheral arterial disease patients and 141 controls (mean age 43) were included. Intact TAFI antigen levels were significantly higher in patients with peripheral arterial disease (112.4±21.1%) than in controls (104.9±19.9%, p=0.03). The risk of peripheral arterial disease increased with 18% (OR 1.18; CI 1.01-1.34) per 10% increase of TAFI antigen. Functional TAFI levels were slightly higher in patients compared to controls, however this difference was not significant. For individuals with the highest functional TAFI levels, above the 90th percentile, the increased risk for peripheral arterial disease was most pronounced (OR 3.1; CI 1.02-9.41). High TAFI levels are associated with increased risk of premature peripheral arterial disease.
    Thrombosis Research 03/2011; 127(3):254-8. · 3.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS), thrombosis develops in the hepatic veins or inferior vena cava. To study the relationship between hypofibrinolysis and BCS, we measured plasma levels of fibrinolysis proteins in 101 BCS patients and 101 healthy controls and performed a plasma-based clot lysis assay. In BCS patients, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) levels were significantly higher than in controls (median, 6.3 vs 1.4 IU/mL, P < .001). Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor and plasmin inhibitor levels were lower than in controls (13.8 vs 16.9 microg/mL and 0.91 vs 1.02 U/L, both P < .001). Median plasma clot lysis time (CLT) was 73.9 minutes in cases and 73.0 minutes in controls (P = .329). A subgroup of cases displayed clearly elevated CLTs. A CLT above the 90th or 95th percentile of controls was associated with an increased risk of BCS, with odds ratios of 2.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-5.5) and 3.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-9.7), respectively. In controls, only PAI-1 activity was significantly associated with CLT. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms of fibrinolysis proteins revealed no significant differences between cases and controls. This case-control study provides the first evidence that an impaired fibrinolytic potential, at least partially caused by elevated PAI-1 levels, is related to the presence of BCS.
    Blood 11/2009; 115(2):388-95. · 9.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT:  Background and objectives: Thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) attenuates fibrinolysis and may therefore contribute to the pathophysiology of arterial thrombosis. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the pathogenetic role of TAFI levels and genotypes in young patients with arterial thrombosis. Patients and methods: In a case–control study, 327 young patients with a recent first-ever event of coronary heart disease (CHD subgroup) or cerebrovascular disease (ischemic stroke subgroup) and 332 healthy young controls were included. TAFI levels [intact TAFI, activation peptide (TAFI-AP) and (in)activated TAFI (TAFIa(i)] and TAFI activity were measured and genetic variations in the TAFI gene (−438G/A, 505G/A and 1040C/T) were determined. Results: In the total group of patients, TAFIa(i) levels were higher (145.1 ± 37.5%) than in controls (137.5 ± 31.3%, P = 0.02). Plasma levels of intact TAFI, TAFI-AP and TAFI activity were similar in patients and controls. In the CHD subgroup (n = 218), intact TAFI levels were higher (109.4 ± 23.0%) than in controls (102.8 ± 20.7%, P = 0.02). In 325Ile/Ile homozygotes, lower TAFI levels and a decreased risk of arterial thrombosis were observed (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.34–0.99) compared with patients with the common 325Thr/Thr genotype. This association was most evident in CHD patients (OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.26–0.90). Haplotype analyses supported a role for the Thr325Ile polymorphism. Conclusions: TAFIa(i) levels were higher in patients with cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, the TAFI 325Thr/Ile polymorphism was associated with lower TAFI levels and with the risk of cardiovascular disease in young patients, especially in CHD.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 05/2009; 7(6):919 - 927. · 6.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The relationship between defective fibrinolysis and arterial thrombosis is uncertain. The evaluation of the plasma fibrinolytic potential might provide stronger evidence linking fibrinolysis to arterial thrombosis than the evaluation of the individual fibrinolytic factors. We determined the plasma fibrinolytic potential of 335 young survivors of a first arterial thrombosis, including coronary artery disease (n = 198), ischaemic stroke (n = 103) and peripheral artery disease (n = 34), enrolled in a population-based case-control study and of 330 healthy individuals. Patients had significantly higher clot lysis times (CLTs) than the controls. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated as a measure of relative risk. The OR for arterial thrombosis was determined in these subjects who had a CLT above the 60th, 70th, 80th, 90th and 95th percentiles of the values found in the control subjects. We found a progressive increase in risk of arterial thrombosis in subjects with hypofibrinolysis (OR: 1.7, 2.0, 2.3, 2.3 and 2.9, respectively). Relative risk estimates obtained in the whole group were comparable those obtained in the event-subgroups. In conclusion, a low plasma fibrinolytic potential, found in 10% of the population, increases the relative risk of arterial thrombosis twofold. This points to an important contribution of hypofibrinolysis to the burden of arterial thrombosis.
    British Journal of Haematology 02/2009; 145(1):115-20. · 4.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In pediatric meningococcal sepsis, an imbalance between coagulation and fibrinolysis and proinflammatory action play major roles. We hypothesized that thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) and/or TAFI activation markers are involved in the pathogenesis of meningococcal sepsis. Children with severe meningococcal sepsis (n = 112) previously included in Rotterdam-based trials participated in this study. Clinical and laboratory parameters and severity scores were assessed. TAFI and TAFI activation markers were determined: TAFI activation peptide (TAFI-AP) and (in)activated TAFI [TAFIa(i)]. The -438G/A, Ala147Thr, and Thr325Ile polymorphisms were genotyped. TAFI levels were significantly decreased in patients with meningococcal disease at admission compared to the convalescence state. TAFI was decreased in patients with septic shock vs. those with no shock. TAFI-AP levels were increased in patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) vs. patients without DIC. TAFI-AP and TAFIa(i) were significantly increased in non-survivors vs. survivors. TAFI-AP levels and the TAFI-AP/TAFI ratio were also strongly correlated to severity scores and laboratory parameters. The TAFI 325Ile/Ile genotype was overrepresented in patients with DIC. Activation markers of TAFI were associated with the occurrence of DIC and mortality in meningococcal sepsis patients. A determination of TAFI, TAFI-AP, and TAFIa(i) is required to enable coherent interpretation of the role of TAFI in disease.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 03/2008; 6(2):268-76. · 6.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Besides having a key role in fibrinolysis, the plasminogen system has been implicated in cell migration and angiogenesis. A common mechanism is the binding of plasminogen to carboxy-terminal lysine residues in partially degraded fibrin or on cellular surfaces. Here we examined the involvement of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) and pancreatic carboxypeptidase B (CPB) in an in vitro capillary tube formation system, which is largely plasminogen-dependent. Human microvascular endothelial cells (hMVECs) were seeded on a 3D plasma clot matrix and subsequently stimulated with bFGF/tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. Tube formation was analyzed and fibrin degradation products (FbDP) were determined in the medium. Supplementation of the matrix with additional TAFI or CPB produced a reduction in tube formation. Pretreatment of hMVECs with CPB before seeding resulted in a similar effect. FbDP-levels indicated a concomitant reduction in matrix proteolysis. A TAFIa inhibitor increased tube formation and FbDP release into the medium. In separate assays, CPB impaired the migration of hMVECs in a dose-dependent manner, whereas proliferation and adhesion remained unaffected. Overall, these results demonstrate that TAFI and CPB in these systems modulate the plasminogen system both in the matrix and on the cell surface, thus leading to the inhibition of endothelial cell movement and tube formation.
    Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 11/2007; 27(10):2157-62. · 6.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, the in-vitro fibrinolytic efficacy of Tenecteplase, Amediplase and scu-PA was investigated in different external lysis models by measuring the lysis of human plasma clots after the addition of the plasminogen activators (PAs) to the surrounding plasma. The effect of TAFI was examined for each PA by neutralising TAFIa with potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (PCI). The lytic efficacy of Amediplase was lower than that of Tenecteplase at low PA concentrations but slightly higher at therapeutic concentrations. The activity of scu-PA was clearly lower than that of either Tenecteplase or Amediplase. The TAFI system inhibited external clot lysis mediated by all the PAs when thrombomodulin was present in the model. In the therapeutic range (5-10 mug/ml) however, the TAFIa effect was negligible for both Amediplase and Tenecteplase. At lower PA concentrations the effect of TAFI on Amediplase was slightly stronger than that on Tenecteplase. Under static conditions the lysis rates were lower than with stirring. The role of TAFI was similar under both conditions. In conclusion, at therapeutic concentrations Amediplase was slightly more active than Tenecteplase and scu-PA under all conditions used. Therefore, Amediplase might possibly be a more potent thrombolytic agent at these concentrations and increase the efficacy of thrombolysis. The potential of TAFI for inhibiting thrombolytic therapy is probably low. However in conditions where the local PA concentrations are sub-optimal TAFI might affect the lysis rate.
    Thrombosis and Haemostasis 10/2006; 96(3):325-30. · 5.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It is long known that cirrhosis is associated with hyperfibrinolysis, which might contribute to bleeding problems of patients with this disease. However, hyperfibrinolysis has been assessed by using tests (such as euglobulin, plasma or diluted whole blood clot lysis assays), which do not reflect all changes that might occur in the fibrinolytic parameters in blood. A recent study even questioned the presence of a hyperfibrinolytic state in nonbleeding cirrhotic patients, since no evidence of increased fibrinolysis was observed with a new plasma-based clot lysis assay (Gastroenterology 2001;121:131). Therefore we decided to re-investigate the fibrinolytic state of cirrhotic patients with a recently developed test for global fibrinolytic capacity (GFC) using undiluted whole blood. Non-anticoagulated blood was collected from 30 healthy controls and 75 patients with cirrhosis of varying severity (34 Child-Pugh A, 28 Child-Pugh B and 13 Child-Pugh C). The GFC was determined immediately after collection by clotting the blood, incubating the clots during 3 hours at 37 degrees and then measuring the generated fibrin degradation products. Various haemostatic parameters were determined in plasma samples by using functional activity assays. The median GFC (25th-75th percentile) increased from 1.7 (0.8-3.5) mg/l in the controls to 4.0 (1.6-13.0) mg/l in Child-Pugh A (n.s.), to 11.1 (2.3-31.9) mg/l in Child-Pugh B (P Keywords: fibrinolysis; global test; liver cirrhosis Document Type: Research Article DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1538-7836.2006.00256.x Affiliations: 1: Department of Hematology, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands 2: Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands Publication date: October 1, 2006 $(document).ready(function() { var shortdescription = $(".originaldescription").text().replace(/\\&/g, '&').replace(/\\, '<').replace(/\\>/g, '>').replace(/\\t/g, ' ').replace(/\\n/g, ''); if (shortdescription.length > 350){ shortdescription = "" + shortdescription.substring(0,250) + "... more"; } $(".descriptionitem").prepend(shortdescription); $(".shortdescription a").click(function() { $(".shortdescription").hide(); $(".originaldescription").slideDown(); return false; }); }); Related content In this: publication By this: publisher In this Subject: Allergy & Immunology By this author: Rijken, D. ; Kock, E. ; Guimarães, A. ; Darwish Murad, S. ; Janssen, H. ; Leebeek, F. GA_googleFillSlot("Horizontal_banner_bottom");
    Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 01/2006; 4:222-222. · 6.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several studies have suggested that thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) levels are associated with the risk of arterial thrombosis, but results have been contradictory. We studied functional TAFI levels and TAFI gene polymorphisms in 124 patients with a recent ischemic stroke and 125 age- and sex-matched controls to establish the role of TAFI in ischemic stroke. Functional TAFI levels, defined as TAFI-related retardation (RT), the difference in clot lysis time (LT) in the absence or presence of a specific activated TAFI inhibitor (potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor [PCI]), were higher in patients than controls (19.5 +/- 4.2 vs. 17.7 +/- 3.7 min, P < 0.005). Clot LTs in the presence of PCI, which were independent of TAFI, were also increased in ischemic stroke patients. This indicates that in these patients fibrinolysis is impaired not only by high TAFI levels, but also by other mechanisms. Individuals with functional TAFI levels in the highest quartile had an increased risk of ischemic stroke compared with the lowest quartile [odds ratio (OR) 4.0, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6-9.8]. In an unselected group of 36 of the 125 stroke patients functional TAFI levels were also measured at 3 months, and were persistently high. This indicates that increased functional TAFI levels after stroke are not caused by an acute phase reaction. No difference was found between patients and controls with respect to TAFI genotype distribution. Increased functional TAFI levels, resulting in decreased fibrinolysis, are associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 10/2005; 3(10):2211-8. · 6.08 Impact Factor
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    A H C Guimarães, R M Bertina, D C Rijken
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    ABSTRACT: New thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) assays are necessary for studying the role of this fibrinolysis inhibitor in cardiovascular disease. The identification of a functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (1040C/T) leading to a TAFI-variant with increased stability but lower antigen levels has made the determination of functional activity even more essential. Therefore, we developed a new assay for the functional activity of TAFI in citrated plasma samples. This assay is based on the retardation of plasma clot lysis by TAFIa. TAFI activation was induced simultaneously with fibrin formation and lysis was mediated by rt-PA. The variability of other plasma components was minimized by a 20-fold dilution of the samples in TAFI-depleted plasma. Lysis times (-/+ potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor) and the TAFI-related retardation of clot lysis, the functional parameter of the assay, were determined in a group of 92 healthy volunteers, as well as TAFI antigen levels (electroimmunoassay) and two TAFI SNPs (-438A/G and 1040C/T). TAFI-related retardation was 19.8 +/- 5.6 min (mean +/- SD) and was correlated with the antigen level. The specific antifibrinolytic activity of TAFI was associated with the -438A/G and 1040C/T genotypes. Individuals with the 325Ile-variant had on average a 34% higher TAFI-specific antifibrinolytic activity than individuals with the 325Thr-isoform. The TAFI-related retardation in the two groups of individuals did not differ, as a lower level compensated for the higher specific antifibrinolytic activity of the 325Ile-isoform. This assay provides valuable information about the performance of different TAFI isoforms and constitutes a new method for studying the role of TAFI in cardiovascular disease.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 07/2005; 3(6):1284-92. · 6.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) is a plasma zymogen, which upon activation is capable of delaying fibrinolysis. We investigated the migration and detection of the activation peptide of TAFI during SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Purified TAFI before and after activation by thrombin/thrombomodulin was electrophoresed on 4-20% polyacrylamide gels and stained with Coomassie blue as well as Western blotting. Before activation, Coomassie blue staining resulted in one main band of TAFI. After activation, a sharp band corresponding to TAFIa was observed. No distinct activation peptide was detected, in agreement with the literature. Western blotting using a polyclonal anti-TAFI antibody, on the other hand, showed one additional broad band with an Mr of about 33 000 after TAFI activation. N-terminal sequence analysis confirmed that this band represented the activation peptide of TAFI. In addition, we tested the reactivity of two anti-TAFI monoclonal antibodies (MA-T3D8 and MA-T18A8) towards TAFI before and after activation by Western blotting. Both monoclonal antibodies recognized TAFI. After activation of TAFI, MA-T3D8 reacted with TAFIa, while MA-T18A8 reacted with the activation peptide. We identify the 33 000 band as the activation peptide of TAFI and exemplify the use of this information for the characterization of monoclonal antibodies against TAFI.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 06/2004; 2(5):780-4. · 6.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) antigen levels exhibit a large interindividual variability in which genetic control seems to play a major role. However, recent reports have questioned the association between TAFI concentration and genotype, suggesting that variable antibody reactivity towards TAFI isoforms, particularly the Thr325Ile polymorphism (1040C/T), may lead to artefacts in TAFI antigen levels. In order to compare assay outcome we determined plasma TAFI levels in 92 healthy individuals, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (commercial antibodies), an electroimmunoassay (in-house antibodies) and a commercial chromogenic assay (Actichrome TAFI). Each individual was genotyped for the -438A/G and 1040C/T polymorphisms in the TAFI gene. TAFI levels were significantly associated with genotype in both antigen and chromogenic assays. All assays displayed significant correlations with each other. Linear regression and Bland-Altman agreement analysis in the genotype subgroups showed that neither the genotype nor the concentration affected the relationship between the Actichrome TAFI and the electroimmunoassay. In contrast, the ELISA/Actichrome TAFI and the ELISA/electroimmunoassay relationships were concentration- and genotype-dependent. Our results demonstrate that artefacts may arise when measuring TAFI antigen levels by ELISA. Nevertheless, the electroimmunoassay and the Actichrome TAFI assay support a genotype-related variation of TAFI concentration.
    British Journal of Haematology 04/2004; 124(5):659-65. · 4.94 Impact Factor
  • Ana H C Guimarães, Dingeman C Rijken
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    ABSTRACT: TAFIa was shown to attenuate fibrinolysis. In our in vitro study, we investigated how the inhibitory effect of TAFIa depended on the type and concentration of the plasminogen activator (PA). We measured PA-mediated lysis times of plasma clots under conditions of maximal TAFI activation by thrombin-thrombo-modulin in the absence and presence of potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor. Seven different PAs were compared comprising both tPA-related (tPA, TNK-tPA, DSPA), bacterial PA-related (staphylokinase and APSAC) and urokinase-related (tcu-PA and k2tu-PA) PAs. The lysis times and the retardation factor were plotted against the PA concentration. The retardation factor plots were bell-shaped. At low PA concentrations, the retardation factor was low, probably due to the limited stability of TAFIa. At intermediate PA concentrations the retardation factor was maximal (3-6 depending on the PA), with TNK-tPA, APSAC and DSPA exhibiting the strongest effect. At high PA concentrations, the retardation factor was again low, possibly due to inactivation of TAFIa by plasmin or to a complete conversion of glu-plasminogen into lys-plasminogen. Using individual plasmas with a reduced plasmin inhibitor activity (plasmin inhibitor Enschede) the bell-shaped curve of the retardation factor shifted towards lower tPA and DSPA concentrations, but the height did not decrease. In conclusion, TAFIa delays the lysis of plasma clots mediated by all the plasminogen activators tested. This delay is dependent on the type and concentration of the plasminogen activator, but not on the fibrin specificity of the plasminogen activator. Furthermore, plasmin inhibitor does not play a significant role in the inhibition of plasma clot lysis by TAFI.
    Thrombosis and Haemostasis 04/2004; 91(3):473-9. · 5.76 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

209 Citations
83.22 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005–2009
    • Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam
      • Department of Hematology
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2007
    • VU University Medical Center
      • Institute for Cardiovascular Research (ICaR-VU)
      Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands