Daniele Ferreira

Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Estado de Sao Paulo, Brazil

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Publications (7)25.34 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Outbreaks of severe acute Chagas' disease acquired by oral infection, leading to death in some cases, have occurred in recent years. Using the mouse model, we investigated the basis of such virulence by analyzing a Trypanosoma cruzi isolate, SC, from a patient with severe acute clinical symptoms, who was infected by oral route. It has previously been shown that, upon oral inoculation into mice, T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes invade the gastric mucosal epithelium by engaging the stage-specific surface glycoprotein gp82, whereas the surface molecule gp90 functions as a down-modulator of cell invasion. We found that, when orally inoculated into mice, metacyclic forms of the SC isolate, which express high levels of gp90, produced high parasitemias and high mortality, in sharp contrast with the reduced infectivity in vitro. Upon recovery from the mouse stomach 1h after oral inoculation, the gp90 molecule of the parasites was completely degraded, and their entry into HeLa cells, as well as into Caco-2 cells, was increased. The gp82 molecule was more resistant to digestive action of the gastric juice. Host cell invasion of SC isolate metacyclic trypomastigotes was augmented in the presence of gastric mucin. No alteration in infectivity was observed in T. cruzi strains CL and G which were used as references and which express gp90 molecules resistant to degradation by gastric juice. Taken together, our findings suggest that the exacerbation of T. cruzi infectivity, such as observed upon interaction of the SC isolate with the mouse stomach components, may be responsible for the severity of acute Chagas' disease that has been reported in outbreaks of oral T. cruzi infection.
    International Journal for Parasitology 01/2008; 37(14):1609-16. · 3.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The disassembly of host cell actin cytoskeleton as a facilitator of Trypanosoma cruzi invasion has been reported by some authors, while other workers claim that it instead inhibits internalization of the parasite. In this study we aimed at elucidating the basis of this discrepancy. We performed experiments with metacyclic trypomastigotes of T. cruzi strains G and CL, which differ markedly in infectivity and enter target cells by engaging the surface molecules gp35/50 and gp82, respectively, which have signaling activity. Treatment of HeLa cells with the F-actin-disrupting drug cytochalasin D or latrunculin B inhibited the invasion by strain G but not the invasion by strain CL. In contrast to cells penetrated by strain CL, which were previously shown to have a disrupted actin cytoskeleton architecture, no such alteration was observed in HeLa cells invaded by strain G, and parasites were found to be closely associated with target cell actin. Coinfection with enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC), which recruits host cell actin for internalization, drastically reduced entry of strain CL into HeLa cells but not entry of strain G. In contrast to gp82 in its recombinant form, which induces disruption of F-actin and inhibits EIEC invasion, purified mucin-like gp35/50 molecules promoted an increase in EIEC uptake by HeLa cells. These data, plus the finding that drugs that interfere with mammalian cell signaling differentially affect the internalization of metacyclic forms of strains G and CL, indicate that the host cell invasion mediated by gp35/50 is associated with signaling events that favor actin recruitment, in contrast to gp82-dependent invasion, which triggers the signaling pathways leading to disassembly of F-actin.
    Infection and Immunity 11/2006; 74(10):5522-8. · 4.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Experiments were performed to elucidate why Trypanosoma cruzi isolates 573 and 587 differ widely in their efficiency to infect gastric mucosal epithelium when administered orally to mice. These isolates have the same surface profile and a similar capacity to enter host cells in vitro. Metacyclic forms of isolates 573 and 587 and the control CL isolate expressed similar levels of gp82, which is a cell invasion-promoting molecule. Expression of gp90, a molecule that downregulates cell invasion, was lower in the CL isolate. Consistent with this profile, approximately threefold fewer parasites of isolates 573 and 587 entered epithelial HeLa cells, as compared to the CL isolate. No difference in the rate of intracellular parasite replication was observed between isolates. When given orally to mice, metacyclic forms of isolate 573, like the CL isolate, produced high parasitemia (>10(6) parasites per ml at the peak), killing approximately 40% of animals, whereas infection with isolate 587 resulted in low parasitemia (<10(5) parasites per ml), with zero mortality. On the fourth day post-inoculation, tissue sections of the mouse stomach stained with hematoxylin and eosin showed a four to sixfold higher number of epithelial cells infected with isolate 573 or CL than with isolate 587. The rate of intracellular parasite development was similar in all isolates. Mimicking in vivo infection, parasites were treated with pepsin at acidic pH and then assayed for their ability to enter HeLa cells or explanted gastric epithelial cells. Pepsin extensively digested gp90 from isolate 573 and significantly increased invasion of both cells, but had minor effect on gp90 or infectivity of isolates 587 and CL. The profile of g82 digestion was similar in isolates 573 and 587, with partial degradation to a approximately 70 kDa fragment, which preserved the target cell binding domain as well as the region involved in gastric mucin adhesion. Gp82 from CL isolate was resistant to pepsin. Assays with parasites recovered from the mouse stomach 2 h after oral infection showed an extensive digestion of gp90 and increased infectivity of isolate 573, but not of isolate 587 or CL. Our data indicate that T. cruzi infection in vitro does not always correlate with in vivo infection because host factors may act on parasites, modulating their infectivity, as is the case of pepsin digestion of isolate 573 gp90.
    Microbes and Infection 02/2006; 8(1):36-44. · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Experiments were performed to elucidate why Trypanosoma cruzi isolates 573 and 587 differ widely in their efficiency to infect gastric mucosal epithelium when administered orally to mice. These isolates have the same surface profile and a similar capacity to enter host cells in vitro. Metacyclic forms of isolates 573 and 587 and the control CL isolate expressed similar levels of gp82, which is a cell invasion-promoting molecule. Expression of gp90, a molecule that downregulates cell invasion, was lower in the CL isolate. Consistent with this profile, approximately threefold fewer parasites of isolates 573 and 587 entered epithelial HeLa cells, as compared to the CL isolate. No difference in the rate of intracellular parasite replication was observed between isolates. When given orally to mice, metacyclic forms of isolate 573, like the CL isolate, produced high parasitemia (>10(6) parasites per ml at the peak), killing approximately 40% of animals, whereas infection with isolate 587 resulted in low parasitemia (<10(5) parasites per ml), with zero mortality. On the fourth day post-inoculation, tissue sections of the mouse stomach stained with hematoxylin and eosin showed a four to sixfold higher number of epithelial cells infected with isolate 573 or CL than with isolate 587. The rate of intracellular parasite development was similar in all isolates. Mimicking in vivo infection, parasites were treated with pepsin at acidic pH and then assayed for their ability to enter HeLa cells or explanted gastric epithelial cells. Pepsin extensively digested gp90 from isolate 573 and significantly increased invasion of both cells, but had minor effect on gp90 or infectivity of isolates 587 and CL. The profile of g82 digestion was similar in isolates 573 and 587, with partial degradation to a approximately 70 kDa fragment, which preserved the target cell binding domain as well as the region involved in gastric mucin adhesion. Gp82 from CL isolate was resistant to pepsin. Assays with parasites recovered from the mouse stomach 2 h after oral infection showed an extensive digestion of gp90 and increased infectivity of isolate 573, but not of isolate 587 or CL. Our data indicate that T. cruzi infection in vitro does not always correlate with in vivo infection because host factors may act on parasites, modulating their infectivity, as is the case of pepsin digestion of isolate 573 gp90.
    Microbes and Infection 01/2006; · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated the properties of metacyclic trypomastigotes of non-virulent Trypanosoma cruzi clone CL-14, as compared to the parental isolate CL. In contrast to the CL isolate, which produces high parasitemias in mice, metacyclic forms of clone CL-14 failed to produce patent infection. In vitro, the number of clone CL-14 parasites that entered epithelial HeLa cells, after 1 h incubation, was approximately four-fold lower than that of the CL isolate and at 72 h post-infection intracellular replication was not apparent whereas cells infected with the CL isolate contained large number of parasites replicating as amastigotes. CL isolate metacyclic forms were long and slender, with the kinetoplast localised closer to the nucleus than to the posterior end, whereas clone CL-14 parasites were shorter, with the kinetoplast very close to the posterior end. Cysteine proteinase cruzipain and trans-sialidase activities were lower in CL isolate than in clone CL-14. The surface profile was similar, except that the expression of gp82, the stage-specific glycoprotein that promotes CL isolate mucosal infection in vivo and host cell invasion in vitro, was greatly reduced on the surface of clone CL-14 metacyclic forms. Genistein, a specific inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinase, which is activated in CL isolate by binding of gp82 to its host cell receptor, did not affect host cell entry of clone CL-14. In contrast with CL isolate, the infectivity of clone CL-14 was not affected by phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 but was diminished by a combination of ionomycin plus NH(4)Cl, which releases Ca(2+) from acidic vacuoles. Internalisation of clone CL-14, but not of CL isolate, was significantly increased by treating parasites with neuraminidase, which removes sialic acid from the mucin-like surface molecule gp35/50. Taken together, our data suggest an association between the non-virulence of clone CL-14 metacyclic forms and the reduced expression of gp82, which precludes the activation of signal transduction pathways leading to effective host cell invasion.
    International Journal for Parasitology 07/2004; 34(7):851-60. · 3.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes invade and replicate in the gastric mucosal epithelium after oral infection. In this study we analyzed the process of infection by T. cruzi isolates deficient in the expression of gp82, the metacyclic stage-specific surface glycoprotein implicated in target cell entry in vitro and in promoting mucosal infection in mice after oral challenge. Mice infected by the oral route with metacyclic forms of gp82-deficient isolate 569 or 588 developed patent parasitemia but at greatly reduced levels compared to those infected with the gp82-expressing isolate CL. Metacyclic forms of both isolates expressed gp30, a surface glycoprotein detectable by monoclonal antibody (MAb) 3F6 directed to gp82. Otherwise, the gp82-deficient isolates displayed a surface profile similar to that of the CL isolate and also entered epithelial HeLa cells in a manner inhibitable by MAb 3F6 and dependent on the parasite signal transduction that involved the activation of protein tyrosine kinase and Ca(2+) mobilization from thapsigargin-sensitive stores. Like gp82, gp30 triggered the host cell Ca(2+) response required for parasite internalization. Purified gp30 and the recombinant gp82 inhibited HeLa cell invasion of metacyclic forms of isolates 569 and 588 by approximately 90 and approximately 70%, respectively. A cell invasion assay performed in the presence of gastric mucin, mimicking the in vivo infection, showed an inhibition of 70 to 75% in the internalization of gp82-deficient isolates but not of the CL isolate. The recombinant gp82 exhibited an adhesive capacity toward gastric mucin much higher than that of gp30. Taken together, our findings indicate that target cell entry of metacyclic trypomastigotes can be mediated either by gp82 or gp30 but that efficient mucosal infection depends on the expression of gp82.
    Infection and Immunity 12/2003; 71(11):6184-91. · 4.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes invade and replicate in the gastric mucosal epithelium after oral infection. In this study we analyzed the process of infection by T. cruzi isolates deficient in the expression of gp82, the metacyclic stage-specific surface glycoprotein implicated in target cell entry in vitro and in promoting mucosal infection in mice after oral challenge. Mice infected by the oral route with metacyclic forms of gp82-deficient isolate 569 or 588 developed patent parasitemia but at greatly reduced levels compared to those infected with the gp82-expressing isolate CL. Metacyclic forms of both isolates expressed gp30, a surface glycoprotein detectable by monoclonal antibody (MAb) 3F6 directed to gp82. Otherwise, the gp82-deficient isolates displayed a surface profile similar to that of the CL isolate and also entered epithelial HeLa cells in a manner inhibitable by MAb 3F6 and dependent on the parasite signal transduction that involved the activation of protein tyrosine kinase and Ca(2+) mobilization from thapsigargin-sensitive stores. Like gp82, gp30 triggered the host cell Ca(2+) response required for parasite internalization. Purified gp30 and the recombinant gp82 inhibited HeLa cell invasion of metacyclic forms of isolates 569 and 588 by approximately 90 and approximately 70%, respectively. A cell invasion assay performed in the presence of gastric mucin, mimicking the in vivo infection, showed an inhibition of 70 to 75% in the internalization of gp82-deficient isolates but not of the CL isolate. The recombinant gp82 exhibited an adhesive capacity toward gastric mucin much higher than that of gp30. Taken together, our findings indicate that target cell entry of metacyclic trypomastigotes can be mediated either by gp82 or gp30 but that efficient mucosal infection depends on the expression of gp82.
    Infection and Immunity 11/2003; · 4.07 Impact Factor