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Publications (4)16.27 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Visfatin is a recently described adipose tissue derived hormone whose role in humans remains largely unknown. To determine visfatin's relationship to lipoproteins and body composition parameters in Asian Indians and Caucasians. A cross-sectional study. Men and women living in Montreal, Canada between the ages of 20 and 60 years were recruited for participation in this study. Subjects were excluded if they had a history of CVD or were taking lipid lowering medication. Individuals identified themselves as Asian Indian or Caucasian. Anthropometric measurements were collected including weight, height, waist circumference, hip circumference and body fat percentage (BF%). Serum samples were analysed for total cholesterol, HDL-C, apoA1, apoB and visfatin. There was no difference in visfatin levels between Indian and Caucasian men (64.50 +/- 3.98 ng/ml vs 73.01 +/- 6.45 ng/ml, ns, respectively) and Indian and Caucasian women (59.03 +/- 5.71 ng/ml vs 77.70 +/- 7.63 ng/ml, ns, respectively), despite large differences in BF%, apoB and the apoB/apoA1 ratio. Visfatin correlated positively to HDL-C and apoA1 in the Indian men (R = 0.42, P = 0.004 and R = 0.48, P = 0.003) and Indian women (R = 0.46, P = 0.05 and R = 0.59, P = 0.01). Visfatin concentrations may be related to HDL metabolism in Asian Indian immigrants.
    Clinical Endocrinology 12/2006; 65(5):667-72. · 3.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Migrant and native South Asians appear to be at increased risk of Type II diabetes mellitus and coronary disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between the most accurate summary index of the lipoprotein-related risk of vascular disease, the apoB (apolipoprotein B-100)/apoA-I (apolipoprotein A-I) ratio, and body composition in established migrant South Asians and white Caucasians living in Canada. Men and women living in Montreal, Canada between the ages of 20-60 years were recruited for participation in the study. Subjects were excluded if they had a history of cardiovascular disease or were taking lipid-lowering medication. Individuals identified themselves as Asian Indian or Caucasian. Anthropometric measurements were collected, including weight, height, waist circumference, hip circumference and body fat percentage. Plasma samples were analysed for total cholesterol, HDL-C (high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol), apoA-I and apoB. Indian subjects had a substantially higher WHR (waist-to-hip ratio) than Caucasian subjects [men, 0.93+/-0.01 compared with 0.86+/-0.01 respectively (P<0.001); women, 0.88+/-0.01 compared with 0.77+/-0.01 respectively (P<0.0001)]. WHR correlated strongly with body fat percentage in Caucasians (men, r=0.63, P=0.0002; women, r=0.74, P<0.0001). By contrast, there was no correlation in Indians (men, r=0.22, P value not significant; women, r=0.23, P value not significant). In addition, Indian men and women had a higher apoB/A-I ratio than Caucasians [men, 0.85+/-0.04 compared with 0.66+/-0.04 respectively (P=0.001); women, 0.73+/-0.04 compared with 0.56+/-0.03 respectively (P=0.0003)]. Of interest, there were also significant correlations between the apoB/apoA-I ratio and WHR in all of the groups, except the Indian women, which were stronger than the correlation of the apoB/apoA-I ratio with BMI. On the other hand, there was no significant relationship between the apoB/apoA-I ratio and the body fat percentage in any of the groups. In conclusion, the present study confirms that, as body fat percentage increases, the distribution of body fat differs between migrant Indians and Caucasians living in Canada. It also relates differences in body fat distribution to differences in the apoB/apoA-I ratio, providing at least part of the answer as to why South Asians may be at increased risk of vascular disease.
    Clinical Science 09/2006; 111(3):201-7. · 4.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The adipocyte life cycle hypothesis states that the metabolic properties of an adipocyte vary predictably during its life cycle: that as an adipocyte matures, it accumulates triacylglycerol (triglyceride) and becomes larger; that the rates of triacylglycerol synthesis and lipolysis are matched within adipocytes and that larger adipocytes, in general, have greater rates of triacylglycerol synthesis and, concurrently, greater rates of lipolysis and, therefore, larger adipocytes have greater rates of transmembrane fatty acid flux; and that the secretion of cytokines can also be related to adipocyte size with larger adipocytes having a more unfavourable profile of cytokine secretion than smaller adipocytes. Adipocyte location is an important modifier of this relationship and the favoured sites of adipocyte proliferation are a function of gender and the position within the life cycle of the organism at which proliferation occurs. The adipocyte life cycle hypothesis posits that the metabolic consequences of obesity depend on whether expansion of adipose tissue is achieved primarily by an increase in adipocyte number or adipocyte size. This hypothesis may explain a variety of previously unanswered clinical puzzles such as the vulnerability of many peoples from South East Asia to the adverse metabolic consequences of obesity.
    Clinical Science 02/2006; 110(1):1-9. · 4.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Asian Indian immigrants have an increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, there is very little data examining how the adipokines leptin and adiponectin relate to CVD risk factors such as body fat percentage (BF%), waist to hip ratio (WHR) and the apoB/apoA1 ratio in Asian Indian men and women living in Canada. A cross-sectional study comparing leptin, adiponectin, lipoproteins and anthropometric parameters in Asian Indian men and women to Caucasian men and women (4 groups). Anthropometric data (BMI, BF%, WHR), circulating lipids (apoA1, apoB, total cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol), leptin and adiponectin were measured. Asian Indian men and women had higher leptin and lower adiponectin concentrations then Caucasian men and women, respectively. Leptin (positively) and adiponectin (negatively) correlated with anthropometric parameters and lipoproteins in all four groups. Using stepwise forward multiple regression, a model including TC/HDL-C ratio, WHR, BF%, hip circumference and waist circumference predicted 74.2% of leptin concentration in men. In women, apoB, BF%, waist circumference and age predicted 77.5% of leptin concentration. Adiponectin concentrations in men were predicted (30.2%) by HDL-C, total cholesterol, hip circumference and BF% while in women 41.2% of adiponectin concentration was predicted by the apoB/apoA1 ratio, WHR and age. As is evident from our data, there is a strong relationship between leptin, adiponectin, and abdominal obesity with increased CVD risk, as assessed by the apoB/apoA1 ratio. Dysregulation of these parameters may account for the increased risk of CVD in Asian Indians.
    Nutrition & Metabolism 02/2006; 3:18. · 3.16 Impact Factor